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Have you guys heard of Eddie Garza? This past December he published his first book Salud! Vegan Mexican Cookbook and I was thrilled to receive a copy, and to share with you this recipe for Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas.

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Eddie is the Senior Manager of food & nutrition at the Humane Society of the United States. He is very passionate about teaching the Hispanic and Latino community about healthy plant-based eating. He often appears on TV giving demonstrations, and he travels around the US and Mexico giving cooking classes. I had the opportunity to speak to him over the phone and I was touched by his energy and dedication.

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¡Salud! Vegan Mexican takes traditional Mexican dishes and recreates them to be healthy and plant-based. You can find everything from tacos, burritos, enchiladas, tamales, and salsas. The recipes are very easy to follow and will appeal to the whole family.

My favorite part of the book is that it has both very traditional recipes and some not so traditional ones taken straight out of Eddie’s childhood. (Eddie’s family is from Mexico, but he was born and raised in Brownsville, TX.) My only complaint is that I wish the book had more pictures.

If you are new to veganism or Mexican food you won’t have to worry. Eddie goes over the basics, and does a very good job describing ingredients and cooking techniques. My favorite recipes so far are the Mashed Potatoes and Poblano Flautas, Amaranth Granola with Oats and Mexican Chocolate, Seven Seas Soup, and the Spicy Eggplant Barbacoa Tacos. The book is available for purchase on Amazon, itunes, and Barnes & Noble.

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The Recipe: Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas

These crispy golden flautas are filled with mashed potatoes spiced with poblano peppers, garlic, onion, and cumin. They can be baked or pan fried to a crisp. Your kids will love them! Serve with your salsa of choice, or you can serve them with this Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos.

These Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas from Salud Vegan Mexican Cookbook are golden, crispy, and filled with creamy mashed potatoes and poblano.
4.6 from 5 votes
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Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 12 flautas
Author Eddie Garza

Ingredients

  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 tsp. Vegetable oil
  • 1/2 Onion, white, diced small
  • 1 Poblano chile, diced small
  • 1 tsp. Whole cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 Russet potatoes, baked or microwaved, skins discarded
  • 1 tbsp. Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 12 Corn tortillas

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Lightly spray a nonstick baking sheet with a nonstick cooking spray.

  2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and poblano chile for 4 to 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add the cumin seeds, salt, pepper, and garlic. Sauté 4 more minutes. Remove from the heat.

  3. In a large bowl, mix together the onion mixture, cooked potato, and almond milk. Mash well. Some visible chunks are fine.

  4. Warm the tortillas until they are pliable.

  5. To assemble the flautas, place 2 tbsp. of potato filling in each tortilla and roll it up tightly. Place on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat until all the tortillas are rolled up.

  6. Lightly spray the flautas with nonstick cooking spray and place in the oven. Bake 10 to 12 minutes , or until the edges of the tortillas are brown and crispy. Turn the pan halfway through the cooking time for even cooking.

I received a free copy of this book, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

This post contains affiliate links.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce is a great for dipping flautas or for topping your everyday tacos. It is traditionally served with flautas or taquitos, but it would also make a great addition to some vegan enchiladas. You can also use it as a salad dressing, or as a perfect pairing to your chips and salsa. The best part is that is has absolutely no dairy and it’s delicious.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

I’m taking over this recipe post to make an announcement. I’m pregnant!!! I’m 16 weeks along with baby #3. This pregnancy took us completely by surprise, but we are more than happy to receive another wonderful little one into our lives. This time around the nausea knocked me completely off my feet. It was bad, really bad, but I’m so glad that part is over. Otherwise the pregnancy is progressing normally.

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We are a bit concerned about having another premature baby. My son was born at 34 weeks and my daughter at 33 weeks. They were both in the NICU for a little over two weeks without any serious complications. We are hoping this baby will make it past 34 weeks, so please keep us in your prayers.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

As far as being vegan and pregnant I had a really hard time with the nausea. All vegetables and legumes completely grossed me out, so I ate mostly almonds, fruit, and some tofu. Once it subsided I started adding back in vegetables, starting with the greens and squashes, and then with the cruciferous vegetables. I wasn’t able to start eating legumes until week 14. Oh how I missed my beans! I’m hoping to keep the rest of my pregnancy as vegan as possible. I will keep you posted.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

The Recipe: Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos

This sauce is seriously easy to make and won’t take more than 5 minutes. When I make this for the kids I omit the pickled jalapeño, but if you like spicy you can add as much jalapeño as you like. For another variation, you can add 1 cooked tomatillo for a more salsa verde feel. Enjoy!

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.
4.75 from 4 votes
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Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos

Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 1 cup
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Avocados, large, seed removed, flesh scooped out
  • 1/2 cup Liquid from Mexican Pickled Jalapeños (see note)
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped cilantro
  • 1 Pickled jalapeño pepper (optional)

Preparation

  1. Blend all the ingredients until smooth. 

  2. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 

Chef's Notes

You can buy Mexican pickled jalapeños at almost any grocery store now. My favorite are La Costeña  or you can make your own.

 

I have always had a love for guavas or guayabas, but this year I can’t seem to get enough of them. We are still spending time at my parents’ house in Mexico and guavas are in season right now. My kids are eating crazy amounts of them and I have started looking for other ways to use them. This week we came up with this Spinach Avocado Jicama salad with guava dressing. Baby spinach, creamy avocado, crisp jicama, juicy orange segments, and toasted pistachios are tossed with a sweet and tart guava dressing.

This Spinach Avocado Jicama Salad combines baby spinach, creamy avocado, jicama, orange, and pistachios tossed with a guava dressing.

I’m happy to report that homeschooling is going great! Now that we are surrounded by family, I feel more supported, and my rowdy 7 yr. old has finally gotten around to accepting that mom is the teacher for now. Of course, we still have difficult days with a lot of whining, mostly from him, but sometimes from me. The great thing about it is that if we’re both having a bad day we can stop and move on to other activities as we please. It’s already January, which means that we have been doing this for 6 months! Honestly I didn’t think I was going to last this long.

This Spinach Avocado Jicama Salad combines baby spinach, creamy avocado, jicama, orange, and pistachios tossed with a guava dressing.

 

We are hoping to relocate to San Antonio or Austin to be close to family. I’m excited about having access to more Mexican ingredients, and to create tons of new recipes inspired by our new home. The sale of our book Vegan Tamales Unwrapped is going great, and this makes me wonder if I should write another book.  A reader suggested I should write a book on Vegan Pan Dulce, and I have to say that seems like a pretty good idea to me!

The Recipe: Spinach Avocado Jicama Salad

You can use mixed greens or kale instead of spinach for the salad. Pecans and cashews would also be a good substitutes for pistachios.

This Spinach Avocado Jicama Salad combines baby spinach, creamy avocado, jicama, orange, and pistachios tossed with a guava dressing.
5 from 4 votes
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Spinach Avocado Jicama Salad with Guava Dressing

Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

Guava Dressing

  • 4 Guavas, seeds taken out, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Orange juice
  • 1 tbsp. Apple cider vinegar
  • 1 clove Garlic, small
  • 1/2 cup Water

Salad

  • 1 package (6 oz.) Baby spinach, washed
  • 2 Oranges, peeled, cut into segments
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • 1 cup Jicama, cut into matchsticks
  • 1/4 cup Chopped pistachios, roasted

Preparation

Guava Dressing

  1. Place the guava, orange juice, apple cider vinegar, garlic, and water in the blender and process until smooth. If the dressing is too thick add a little more water or orange juice. Season with salt and pepper.

Salad

  1. Combine all the ingredients for the salad and toss with guava dressing. Sprinkle with the toasted pistachios. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 

Chef's Notes

You can use mixed greens or kale instead of spinach for the salad. Pecans and cashews would also be a good substitutes for pistachios.

 

 

It has taken me some time to finally come up with an acceptable vegan version of Mexican hot chocolate. First we tested different types of Mexican chocolates until we found the best one.  Then we tested different types of plant milks, until finally we did it! This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

We tried 4 different types of plant milks for this recipe: coconut, almond, macadamia, and soy. I chose not to test rice and oat milk, because I thought they would be to thin and watery. The almond milk was our least favorite, which was a surprise, because I thought it was going to be the best one. The flavor was a little bit bitter, the texture thin, but it did foam up really well. Our next least favorite was the coconut milk. The coconut flavor completely overpowered everything, and the texture was almost too fatty. You could feel the fat coating your mouth, and not in a good way. The foam was average. One of our favorites was the macadamia nut milk. The flavor of the macadamia milk was very subtle, and the texture was creamy without being overpowering. The foam was average. Our favorite out of all of them was the soy milk. This was a complete surprise to me. The soy milk really let the chocolate shine through, the texture was just the right amount of creamy, and the foam was thick and bubbly.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

(Just on a side note: The beautiful napkin you see in the picture is from Kari of the site Beautiful Ingredient., a vegan blog focused on bringing in more plant- based meals into your daily life. The napkins are handmade and vegan. You can also find coasters, pot holders, and dishcloths. You can find them on her site or on her shop on Food52.)

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

The family and I are still enjoying time at my parents’ house and we are having a blast. Christmas and New Years was great, I didn’t realize how much I really missed them, and how far away Hawaii really is. It’s time to get back to work though, and I’ve been busy trying to find the best spot to take pictures and start developing new recipes. I didn’t make any New Years resolutions this time, instead I chose a word to keep me motivated the whole year. My word is perseverance: steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success. No matter what this year brings, good or bad, we will persevere. With God’s help of course. How was your holiday?

The Recipe: The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

To make this amazing vegan Mexican hot chocolate we used the TAZA chocolate Mexicano cinnamon tablets, soy milk, and a hand blender to get the foam just right. If you are a traditionalist you can use a molinillo or if you prefer convenience you can use a blender. Serve with these marranitos de piloncillo or these vegan conchas. 

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.
0 from 0 votes
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The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 pckg. (2.7 oz) Taza Chocolate Mexicano, cinnamon
  • 2 cups Soy milk

Preparation

  1. In a medium sauce pot, heat the milk over medium heat until just about to simmer.

  2. Chop chocolate, and add to pot. 

  3. Whisk until the chocolate dissolves. Be careful not to overheat the milk.

  4. Remove the pot from the heat and froth with a molinillo, hand blender, or blender. 

  5. Serve while hot and frothy. 

Chef's Notes

You can find several flavors of Taza Chocolate Mexicano, use your favorite. 

Jeni from Thyme and Love has just released her book The Vegan Mexican Cookbook: Plant-Based Recipes Inspired by Mexico and I couldn’t be more excited! Jeni lived in Mexico city for a time with her husband, and she fell in love with the cuisine and it definitely shows in this book. I found Jeni online about two years ago, she was still living in Mexico at the time, and I quickly became a fan. It is exciting to find other bloggers that share your love of Mexican cuisine, especially vegan Mexican cuisine.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

The book has 25 recipes, they are all quite easy to make, and all plant-based (vegan). The book also has great photography, all done by Jeni herself. My only complaint is that there aren’t more recipes! I’m looking forward to trying the kale and potato taquitos, the hibiscus tacos with guacamole, and the rice pudding popsicles. The best part is that it is only $6.99. The book is only available in electronic form. I encourage you to stop by Thyme & Love and enjoy some of her recipes, and of course to show Jeni some support by buying her book. To get 30% off of your book purchase use the code dorastable30. Thank you Jeni!

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

Today I am going to share with you a recipe from Jeni’s book: Roasted Poblano Hummus. The smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, and the acidity of the lemon and lime really complements the chickpeas and tahini. It is super easy to make and a great appetizer for sharing.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

 

The Recipe: Roasted Poblano Hummus

If you have never roasted your own poblano peppers before you can use canned ones, but roasted them is not complicated at all. The recipe calls for canned chickpeas, but you can cook your own if you like. If you prefer your hummus on the less lemony side I would reduce the amount of lemon and lime. Enjoy!

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.
4.75 from 4 votes
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Roasted Poblano Hummus

Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2 cups
Author Jeni Hernandez

Ingredients

  • 2 Poblano Peppers
  • 1 (15 oz.) can Chickpeas, drained, rinsed
  • 2 1/2 - 3 tbsp. Tahini
  • 3 tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 1 Garlic, clove, peeled
  • 2 tbsp. Lemon, juice
  • 2 tbsp. Lime. juice
  • 3-4 tbsp. Water
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea Salt, or taste
  • 1/4 cup Toasted pine nuts for garnish, optional
  • 1 Pinch Cilantro for garnish, optional

Preparation

  1. Roast the poblano peppers on a comal or heavy skillet over medium heat. Cook until blackened, turning the chiles often. Depending on the thickness of the comal or skillet, it can take 15-20 minutes until all sides of the chiles are blackened.

  2. Once the chiles have blackened, transfer them to a plastic ziploc bag and let them steam for 15-20 minutes. Once the chiles have steamed, peel off the skin. Them cut a slit along the side of the chile and remove the seeds and veins. Roughly chop the chiles and add to a high speed blender or food processor.

  3. Add the chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, lime juice, water and salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until completely smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. Add a tablespoon of water if needed.

    Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.
  4. Taste for seasonings.

  5. Refrigerate until ready to serve. If using toasted pine nuts to garnish, add them to the hummus just before serving. Serve with chips or assorted veggies. 

Chef's Notes

To toast the pine nuts, preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and add the pine nuts. Toast for 8-10 minutes. remove from the baking sheet and transfer to a bowl until ready to serve. 

 

 

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce. The combination of chile ancho, chile guajillo, oregano, a pinch of cumin, and garlic add a smoky and savory flavor to the stew. This dish is inspired by a very northern dish called guisado de puerco in chile colorado. I have of course left out the pork and used a combination of potatoes and chickpeas. It is best served with rice, beans, and warm tortillas.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

I know working with dried chiles can be intimidating at first, but it is quite easy. All you have to do is remove the stems and take out the seeds. They can be slightly toasted to bring out the smoky flavor of the chiles, but it is not necessary to do so. To use them you have to first reconstitute them in hot water. Simple drop the deseeded chiles in nearly boiling water and let them sit for about 10 minutes or until they are soft and pliable. They can be found in your local hispanic market or now most grocery stores carry them in their hispanic sections.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

We have been in Hawaii 7 months now!! Can you believe it? I can’t. I think it has taken me this long to really appreciate the beauty of Hawaii, its people, and culture. We recently travelled to the Big Island for a small 3 day vacation.The Big Island is so different from Oahu, less crowded, but there are not as many restaurants and shops as Oahu.  We had the opportunity to stay at the Four Seasons Hualalai and it was amazing! We had been so stressed out with homeschooling, the blog, my husband working a ridiculous amount of hours, that this is just what we needed. The ambience at the hotel was completely peaceful and relaxing, the hotel itself is beautiful, and the restaurants quite good. The only thing that was disappointing is that they did not have many vegan options. Sometimes it can be such a drag to have to request special meals all the time, it would be nice if there was at least a couple of vegan options on the menu. We also celebrated our 8 year anniversary there, and got a babysitter so we could go out to dinner. It’s amazing how a couple of hours away from the kids, and the stress can put things into perspective. Hopefully one day we can visit another one the Hawaiian islands.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

The Recipe: Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower would also be a great addition to this dish.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.
5 from 2 votes
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Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Ancho chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 4 Guajillo chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 1 Tomato, medium
  • 5 cloves Garlic
  • 1 tsp. Oregano, dried
  • 1 Bay leaf, dried
  • 1/2 tsp. Cumin, ground
  • 1 cup Onion, white, minced
  • 1 ½ cups (1 large) Diced Sweet Potato
  • 1 cup (1 medium) Diced Yukon gold potato
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Chickpeas, drained
  • 2 Thyme sprigs
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Preparation

  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add chiles, tomato and bay leaf and turn heat down to a slow simmer. Let simmer for 10 minutes.
  2. While the chiles are simmering, heat a large pot to medium heat and add ¼ cup of water. Add onion and sweat until tender and translucent, about 4 minutes.
  3. Add potatoes and 1 cup of vegetable stock. Cover and let simmer for about 6 min or until potatoes are tender.
  4. Strain the chiles, but reserve one cup of the chile soaking liquid. Place the drained chiles, garlic, tomato, oregano, cumin, and 1 cup of the chile soaking liquid in the blender and blend until smooth. Strain the sauce.
  5. Add sauce, chickpeas, and sprigs of thyme to the pot with the potatoes. Let simmer slowly for 8-10 minutes. If the sauce is too thick, add more vegetable stock accordingly.
  6. Season with salt and pepper. Remove thyme sprigs before serving.
  7. Serve with rice, beans, and warm corn tortillas.

Chef's Notes

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower would also be a great addition to this dish.

 

 

Beans, beans, beans it seems people either love them or hate them. Guess which one of those is me? I love them of course. Growing up in a Mexican household, beans were just a part of everyday life, and I mean everyday. I have created one of my favorite recipes for you, vegan frijoles charros. This recipe is an adaptation of the recipe my dad uses at his restaurant.  Frijoles charros, depending on what part of Mexico you are in, include chorizo, sausage or bacon. Sometimes the recipe includes a combination of all three of them. I made a big batch of my homemade vegan chorizo the other day and decided to use that instead. The result was a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.

This Vegan Frijoles Charros recipe results in a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.

This Vegan Frijoles Charros recipe results in a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.

The holidays are creeping up on me so fast. I’m not ready. Pumpkin season is here, even in Hawaii. We went and picked out a pumpkin at Aloun Farms last week and it was so hot that day! It made us long for when we lived on the east coast and we would go pumpkin picking and playing in a corn maze in cool fall weather. However, I’m looking forward to making pumpkin marmalade and candied pumpkin with coconut whipped cream. Speaking of holiday food, my book Vegan Tamales Unwrapped is now available on Amazon in kindle format and I am really excited about it. I’m hoping this will help reach more people and spread the tamal love.

This Vegan Frijoles Charros recipe results in a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.

Making vegan tamales doesn't have to be complicated. With over 50 detailed pictures, this ebook will guide you step-by-step in the tamal making process.

 

The kids have developed an obsession with Bob Ross and it’s the cutest thing. The Joy of Painting is now on Netflix and it’s the perfect before bed TV. The kids find it to be super calming and interesting. So much so, that they now ask to watch it every night and there has even been some tears when there’s no time to watch it. There’s just something about his voice that is so soothing. I am certainly glad to get a break from Mickey Mouse and Pokemon!

This Vegan Frijoles Charros recipe results in a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.

The Recipe: Vegan Frijoles Charros Recipe

My dad’s original recipe uses bacon, but can use vegan sausage or vegan chorizo instead. When I make these beans I almost aways use them to make “refried” beans. I just strain some of the liquid out of the beans and puree them in the blender until they have the consistency of refried beans, no oil needed. Enjoy!

This Vegan Frijoles Charros recipe results in a satisfying and warm bowl of tender smoky beans. Perfect for a cold fall day.
4.12 from 9 votes
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Vegan Frijoles Charros Recipe (Mexican Cowboy Beans)

Total Time 2 hours
Servings 6 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • ½ lb. Pinto beans, dried
  • 1 Onion, white, large
  • 3 cloves Garlic, crushed
  • 2 sprigs Cilantro
  • ¼ cup Vegetable stock or water
  • 6 oz. (3/4 cup) Vegan chorizo (see note)
  • 2 Serrano chiles, minced
  • 1 Tomato, large, diced

Preparation

  1. Soak beans in water overnight.
  2. The next day, strain them and place in a large pot. Pour enough water into the pot to fill ¾ of the way.
  3. Cut your onion in half. Place ½ the onion, cilantro sprigs, and 3 garlic cloves into the pot with the beans. Reserve the other half of the onion.
  4. Bring water to a simmer and let beans cook until almost tender, approximately 1 ½ hours.
  5. While the beans are cooking heat a large sauté pan to medium-high heat. Add chorizo and sauté until slightly browned, about 4 minutes. While the chorizo is cooking, dice the other half of the onion.
  6. Remove chorizo from pan and set aside. Add ¼ cup of water, diced onion, and serrano peppers to the sauté pan. Sweat onion and chiles until tender and translucent about 4 – 5 minutes. Add tomato and let cook for 7-8 minutes more, or until the tomato has broken down and released all of its juices.
  7. Add this mixture, and the chorizo to the pot of beans and let simmer for 20 more minutes or until beans are completely tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 

  8. Before serving, remove the half onion, cilantro sprig, and garlic cloves from the beans. Season with salt and pepper

Chef's Notes

You can add vegan bacon or sausage to this as well. You can buy the vegan chorizo or you can make this homemade version.

 

 

 

Pozole is a hearty, spicy, satisfying Mexican soup. It is said to be a hangover cure, which I cannot confirm, but it is certainly a special occasion dish and is often served on Christmas and New Year’s. There are three varieties most commonly served: rojo, verde y blanco. Traditionally pozole is made with pork shank, trotters and shoulder, but of course, this will no longer work for us, so I have created this jackfruit vegan pozole rojo recipe just for you.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This is an adaptation of my grandmother’s famous recipe. Every Christmas for as long as I can remember my grandmother would make two of the biggest pots of pozole and menudo I have ever seen. The adults would salivate over it, talk about how good it was going to be, and would go over to the kitchen and stir the pots to see how much longer it would be until they finally had their pozole. One year I decided I was going to see what the big deal was, and I waited until the kitchen was empty. Then I went over to the pot and grabbed the ginormous ladle. I gave the whole thing a stir and almost fainted and threw up all over myself at the same time! (I must have been about 8 yrs. old.) When I stirred the pot a couple of pork trotters rose up to surface and I swear I saw a pig snout, but I might of imagined that. After that, it took me years to give pozole a try, but I eventually became one of those salivating adults waiting for the pozole to be done each Christmas.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

Now that I no longer eat meat it was only natural that I made a vegan version of this dish. Originally, I was going to make this with mushrooms instead of jackfruit, since I know jackfruit is not easily accesible to many. However, when I went to the grocery store I discovered that here in Hawaii button mushrooms are $8.00 a pound! I quickly decided instead to pay about $5 for two cans of green jackfruit. I am so happy with the result and I know you will be too. It is just as I remember it, so deeply satisfying.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

The Recipe: Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

I have used canned hominy to speed things up, but if you have access to dried hominy you can use that instead. (Dried hominy takes about 2 hours to cook.) Pozole is all about the toppings. Serve with dried oregano, diced white onion, lime wedges, sliced radishes, and shredded cabbage. My grandma used to serve a salsa macha on the side as well for the ones who wanted more heat. Here is a recipe from Mexico in my Kitchen that is very similar to my grandma’s, only she used chile piquín instead of árbol. Enjoy!

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays
4.56 from 29 votes
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Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

Vegan Jackfruit Pozole Rojo, a spicy soup made with dried chiles, hominy, jackfruit, and veggies. 

Course Soup
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword jackfruit, vegan pozole
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 can (29 oz.) White hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 3 quarts Vegetable Stock
  • 5 Chile guajillo, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 2 Chile ancho, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 5 Chile de árbol, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • ½ Onion, white
  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 2 cans (20oz./ea) Young green jackfruit brine, drained
  • 1 Zucchini, medium, cut into dice

Toppings

  • 1 White onion, small, minced
  • 6 Red radishes, sliced into batons
  • 2 tbsp. Oregano, dried
  • ½ Green cabbage, cored, thinly sliced
  • 4 Limes cut into quarters
  • 1 bag Corn chips or tostadas

Preparation

  1. In a large pot, combine the vegetable stock and hominy and bring to a LOW simmer.

  2. While the hominy is simmering, remove stems and seeds from the chile ancho, arbol, and guajillo. Rinse and place in a medium pot with water.
  3. Bring pot to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 min.
  4. Drain chiles, but reserve 1 ½ cups of the chile water. Place chiles, garlic and onion in the blender, add the chile water and blend until smooth. Strain.
  5. To prepare the jackfruit, drain the jackfruit, rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes on each side or until it begins to brown. Pour the chile sauce over the jackfruit and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 10 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper.
  6. Your hominy should still be simmering very slowly. Scoop out one cup of the hominy-vegetable stock mixture and blend until smooth. Pour this back into the pot with the hominy

  7. Raise heat to medium-low, and add the zucchini and shredded jackfruit with sauce. Let simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until the zucchini is tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 

  8. Serve your pozole with all of the toppings on the side.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you don’t have access to jackfruit you can use 2lbs. of mixed mushrooms or soy curls instead. You can substitute the zucchini with chayote with excellent results. If you like your pozole really spicy serve it with this salsa macha from Mexico in my Kitchen

 

Rice has been my nemesis for years. I don’t know why something so simple can be so complicated. Probably because I keep checking under the lid to see if it’s done! This was back when I cooked only with white rice, once I added brown rice to the mix, my complications doubled. That’s why it has taken me so long to finally come up with a good recipe for vegan Mexican brown rice. Some people also refer to it as Spanish rice, but it is all the same. I’m happy to say the kids enjoy brown rice as much as white. I think they don’t really care as long as it’s rice. They eat so much of it, that and noodles.

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

We went on another hike a couple of weeks ago, it’s called Manoa Falls. It’s a pretty popular hike, but not as well known as Diamond Head. This time my hubby went with us and we had a really good time. It takes about 30 minutes to get to the waterfall, and it’s a beautiful sight. It wasn’t too crowded and I would say it is of moderate difficulty. (Just on a side note, if you are ever in Hawaii, the state recommends not to go into the waterfall because there can be bacteria in the water called leptospirosis.) There are still many more hikes to explore, but I have been focusing on getting the hang of homeschooling and trying to post recipes at the same time! It has been a true exercise in patience.

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

We have been here 5 months and I think I’m beginning to get island fever. I keep dreaming about going on a road trip and I don’t even like driving! Then I wake up and realize I can’t go anywhere. What we should really do is visit Maui, I hear it is very vegan friendly, or someone needs to come visit me.

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

The Recipe: Vegan Mexican Brown Rice

The problem I have had with brown rice before is that I could never get it tender enough, so I decided to soak it overnight this time and I really like the results. I dare say it’s almost fluffy. The other really important part of this recipe is toasting the rice. I did it without oil and it worked just fine. Simply add the rice to a medium pot set to medium heat and stir until the rice begins to brown. Careful though, it’s very easy to burn. The toasting ads an aromatic touch to the rice. Enjoy!

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.
4.25 from 4 votes
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The Perfect Vegan Mexican Brown Rice

Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 3 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Brown rice, long grain
  • ¼ Onion, white
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 ½ cups Tomato, diced
  • 1 tbsp. Tomato paste
  • 1 ½ cups Vegetable, stock or broth
  • ½ tsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 cup Peas, frozen

Preparation

  1. Soak the brown rice in cold water overnight.
  2. Drain the rice. Set a medium pot to medium heat and add the rice. Stir often and let rice toast until golden brown, about 8-10 min.
  3. Meanwhile blend the tomato, onion, garlic, and tomato paste until smooth. Strain. You should end up with 1 cup of puree. If you don’t, add enough veg stock to make it one cup.
  4. Pour the tomato puree into the pot with the rice and let simmer for 2 minutes. Add the 1 ½ cups of vegetable stock. Add ½ tsp of salt and stir. Cover and turn heat down to a low simmer. Let cook for 35 – 40 minutes.
  5. Remove pan from heat and let rest covered for 7 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile drop peas in boiling water until tender, about 1 minute, drain.
  7. Add peas to rice and fluff with fork.

Chef's Notes

If you forgot to soak the rice, don’t worry. It will take just a bit longer to cook.

 

Whenever I’m coming down with a cold, all I want is a caldo Tlalpeño. In this vegan caldo Tlalpeño recipe zucchini, potatoes carrots, and rice simmer in a chipotle vegetable broth. It is a comforting traditional home cooked meal.

Caldo Tlalpeño is one of my favorite comfort dishes. My mom, to this day, still makes a version of it whenever anyone one of us is sick. After moving to the U.S. I searched high and low for a restaurant that would serve a good caldo Tlalpeño, but none of them measured up. Until finally, duh, I realized that I should just make it at home. It is super easy to make and it’s another one of those dishes that kids love.

This vegan caldo tlalpeño recipe will keep you coming back for more. Zucchini, potatoes carrots and rice simmer in a chipotle vegetable broth

There’s a legend behind this special dish. It is said that Mexican president Santa Ana (you know, the one that signed away 1/4 of Mexico to the U.S.,) was very hung over after 3 nights of partying and was looking for a quick remedy. He happened to be in Tlalpan, the largest borough of Mexico City. The cook gave him a chicken soup and when the president asked what the name of the soup was, she said caldo Tlalpeño.

This vegan caldo tlalpeño recipe will keep you coming back for more. Zucchini, potatoes carrots and rice simmer in a chipotle vegetable broth

Homeschooling is going well so far. There has been a bit of whining and tears, but I already expected that. It’s actually kind of nice to not have to wake up at 6am and rush out the door to drop kids off at school. On the other hand, by 3 pm mommy is desperate for some alone time. Thank goodness for naps and TV!

I want to say a special thank you to all of you that took the time to respond to my email about the recipes you would like to see on the site. Apparently all of you really like chile rellenos and miss them terribly, so I will be working on that. If there’s any other dish you guys would like to see send me an email or respond to this post. I read every single one!

The Recipe: Vegan Caldo Tlalpeño

  • You can add whatever veggies you like. Chayote would also go really well with this.
  • When I make this for the kids I leave out the chipotle and add it as a condiment at the end for the adults.
  • Baked tofu would be a good addition to this soup as a garnish.
4.5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Caldo Tlalpeño Recipe

This vegan caldo tlalpeño recipe will keep you coming back for more. Zucchini, potatoes carrots and rice simmer in a chipotle vegetable broth
Course Soup
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword caldotlalpeno, vegancaldo
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Diced, white onion
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 10 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 2 sprigs Cilantro, fresh
  • 1/4 cup Rice, long grain
  • 1 cup Potatoes, diced
  • 3/4 cup Carrots, diced
  • 1 1/2 cups Zucchini, diced
  • 1 cup Chickpeas, canned, drained
  • 1 ea. Chipotle chile, adobo, chopped
  • 1/2 Avocado, cut into cubes
  • 1 Lime, cut onto quarters

Preparation

  1. Heat a large pot to medium-low heat. Add 1/4 of water (or 1 tbsp. oil), add onions and sweat for 3-4 minutes until tender and translucent. Add garlic and let cook for 1 more minute

  2. Pour in vegetable stock and cilantro sprigs in a large pot, and bring to a simmer.

  3. Add rice and simmer for 4 minutes.
  4. Add potatoes and simmer for 4 minutes.
  5. Add carrots and simmer for 4 minutes.
  6. Add chipotle in adobo and zucchini and simmer for 5 minutes.
  7. Add chickpeas and simmer for 6-7 minutes or until all the vegetables and rice are tender. 

  8. Season with salt and pepper.
  9. Serve with avocado cubes and lime wedges.

Chef's Notes

To serve, garnish with avocado slices and a splash of lime juice. You can add baked tofu cubes to it for a more protein packed meal.