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This Chiapas tofu avocado scramble is a traditional dish gone vegan, from one of Mexico’s southern states. The tofu is scrambled with a mixture of spices, beans, and lightly fried tortillas strips. It is topped with sliced avocado, crema, and pickled jalapeños.

Tofu crumbled into a large glass bowl for making a tofu avocado scramble

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union. With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet.

Spice mixture poured over crumbled tofu in a large glass bowl.

This recipe was created by the talented Alejandra Zavala. Here she is telling you a little bit of her story:

Alejandra’s Story:

I’m Mexican, born in Sonora!! A little more than two years ago my life took a huge turn. An antinuclear antibody test came back positive, and another series of lab tests finally determined the reason for my inexplicable fatigue, constant pain in my body and bones, hair loss, and gradual loss of hearing in my left ear. My immune system was weak, damaged, and my defenses, just like me, were tired. I returned home with many medications, that I was told I would need to take for life and an enormous sadness.

Tofu cooking in a black non-stick saute pan

It was then that my supervisor told me about the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle, and I decided to investigate. It has been only a year since I started nourishing my body on a plant-based diet and I have been reborn! I no longer feel pain or fatigue, my hair is beautiful, and I take zero medication!! Today, a few months from graduating as a holistic nutrition life coach I feel that my life has taken another turn, but this time one of light and health.

Fried tortilla strips added to tofu in black pan

When Dora launched her project to invite our people to try just how delicious eating a plant-based diet can be, my heart jumped for joy! I wanted to make a special dish, and for me, breakfast is something very close to my heart, because it takes me to when I was a little girl and my family sat down on weekends to have breakfast together.

Pinto beans added to tofu in black pan

This Chiapas avocado tofu scramble is very easy to make, full of nutrients and a lot of protein, but above all, it is full of tradition from the state of Chiapas. Mexican cuisine is so versatile that on a plant-based diet you will enjoy it even more!! I hope you like it. With love,  @saucyrabanillo

You can follow Ale on her Instagram @saucyrabanillo 

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

The Recipe: Chiapas Tofu Avocado Scramble

  • This recipe will show you step-by-step how to make a tofu scramble, it is really quite easy, and delicious. The recipe doesn’t call for it, but if you can find Indian black salt ( Kala Namak) you can get the tofu to taste like egg, because of the sulfur in the salt.
  • This recipe will be even more delicious if you use homemade beans, but if you don’t have time you can use canned beans without a problem.
  • If you don’t want to use oil, you can bake your tortilla strips.
  • You can use your favorite vegan cheese as a topping for this.
  • If you can’t find or don’t like cashews you can make this almond crema.
  • Enjoy!

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

Chiapas Avocado Tofu Scramble

This Chiapas tofu avocado scramble, cooked with spices, beans, and tortillas strips. Topped with avocado, crema, and pickled jalapeños.
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: tofu scramble, vegan mexican breakfast
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 388kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. Tofu firm, drained
  • 1 tbsp. Garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp. Onion powder
  • 1 tsp. Nutritional yeast (optional)
  • ¼ tsp. Smoked paprika
  • ¼ tsp. Ground cumin
  • 2 tbsp. Avocado oil, or your oil of preference
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 cup Cooked pinto beans, with some broth
  • 3 Corn tortillas, cut into strips
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • Pickled jalapeños
  • 4 slices Vegan cheese (optional)

Cashew Crema

  • ¼ cup Raw cashews
  • 2 tbsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • 2 tsp. Apple cider vinegar
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

Making the tofu scramble

  • Crumble the tofu with your hands, until it has the consistency of scrambled eggs. In a small bowl, mix the garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, nutritional yeast, cumin, and salt. Add this spice mixture to the crumbled tofu and mix well.
  • Heat a medium sauté pan to medium heat. Add 1 tbsp. of oil and cook the tofu until golden brown, about 6 to 7 minutes.
  • In another sauté pan, set to medium heat, add the remaining tbsp. of oil and add the tortilla strips to the pan. Cook until golden brown and remove from the pan.
  • Add the soupy beans and crispy tortilla strips to the tofu, and mix well. Season to taste.
  • Serve topped with slices of vegan cheese, pickled jalapeño peppers, avocado slices, and cashew crema.

To prepare the Cashew Cream

  • Soak the cashews in ½ cup of water for two hours.
  • Once the cashews have soaked, place them in the blender with the soaking water, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and salt. Process until completely smooth and cream like.

Notes

  • The recipe doesn’t call for it, but if you can find Indian black salt ( Kala Namak) you can get the tofu to taste like egg, because of the sulfur in the salt.
  • This recipe will be even more delicious if you use homemade beans, but if you don’t have time you can use canned beans without a problem.
  • If you don’t want to use oil, you can bake your tortilla strips.
  • You can use your favorite vegan cheese as a topping for this.
  • If you can’t find or don’t like cashews you can make this almond crema.

Nutrition

Calories: 388kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 17g | Fat: 24g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 138mg | Potassium: 556mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 225IU | Vitamin C: 9.1mg | Calcium: 207mg | Iron: 3.7mg

This Mexican Christmas apple salad is the perfect way to end your Christmas feast. After a meal of Christmas roast, tamales and pozole, this refreshing salad will hit the spot. Crisp apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans are mixed with a sweet almond crema.

Bowl of sweet cream on a dark wooden surface

This has to be one of my favorite childhood food memories, except that we added marshmallows to ours and it was almost sickly sweet. This healthier version is refreshing and sweetened with maple syrup. We would have this salad on Christmas of course, but my grandmother would make a different version for New Year’s with carrots and raisins which was also delicious. Depending on where in Mexico you are some people add raisins, carrots, celery, and even maraschino cherries.

Glass bowl filled with apples, pineapple, grapes, and pecans.

Traditionally this recipe uses crema or even mayonnaise, but I have made a crema with soaked almonds, water, almond milk, and maple syrup. You can also make the crema with cashews or use your favorite vegan yogurt. I prefer using almonds because they’re more affordable, but they are a bit more work because you have to peel them.

Sweet cream poured over fruit in a glass bowl.

Year after year, the longer I’m vegan the less I miss meat and the more I can appreciate veganizing traditional Mexican recipes and fulfilling all of my childhood food memories in a cruelty-free and healthy way. If you haven’t been vegan for long I just want to let you know that your palate does change, that you do adapt, and that it becomes easier and easier.

Fruit tossed in sweet cream in a glass bowl.

The Recipe: Mexican Christmas Apple Salad

  • As optional ingredients, you can add carrots, raisins or celery.
  • I recommend that you make and eat on the same day.
  • You can use your favorite vegan yogurt to make this recipe even quicker
  • Enjoy!!

 

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad in a glass cup on top of a peach colored napkin

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad in a glass cup

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad, crisp apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans are mixed with a sweet almond crema.
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: mexican fruit salad, vegan mexican christmas
Total Time: 1 day
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 189kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Diced gala apples (you can peel or not peel according to preference)
  • 3/4 cup Crushed pineapple, canned or fresh (drained)
  • 1 cup Green grapes, cut in half
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans

Sweet Almond Crema:

  • ½ cup Almonds, raw
  • ¼ - cup Water
  • ¼ cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 tsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • 1 tsp. Maple syrup

Instructions

  • Bring 1 pint of water to a boil in a small sauce pot and pour over the almonds. Let soak overnight.
  • The following day peel the almonds by pressing an almond between your thumb and forefinger and pressing lightly. The skin should just pop off.
  • In a blender, place the almonds, almond milk, lemon juice, and maple syrup and blend at high speed until completely smooth and cream like (to get a super smooth sauce you will need a high powered blender).
  • Place sauce in a small container and refrigerate for 30 min.
  • In a large bowl combine the apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans. Pour sauce over it and mix well.
  • Serve.

Notes

You can use cashews instead of almonds if you prefer. Some people add raisins, maraschino cherries, carrots, and even celery. If you want to go a little crazy you could add vegan mini marshmallows. I recommend that once you've tossed the fruit salad you serve it the same day. 

Nutrition

Calories: 189kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 14mg | Potassium: 245mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 12g | Vitamin A: 50IU | Vitamin C: 4.7mg | Calcium: 57mg | Iron: 0.8mg

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Sauce pot filled with water, cinnamon, and piloncillo

Champurrado History

Champurrrado ingredients are quite simple but the combination is irresistible. Before the Spanish arrived in Mexico with their cows and their milk, champurrado was made with water.

Glass bowl with fresh masa

It is said that the great Aztec emperor Moctezuma Xocoyotzin enjoyed this beverage which he drank in ceremonial vessels made of gold, sweetened with agave honey, and spiced with a bit of chile.

Glass bowl filled with masa and water

Fray Bernardino de Sahagún documented the consumption of atoll or atolli which was drunk by the indigenous warm or cold, for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes.

Glass bowl with masa and water and a hand mixing it together.

Atole vs Champurrado

So what is the difference between atole and champurrado?? Atole is also a drink from pre-Columbian times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. Champurrado is simply atole with chocolate added to it, in other words, chocolate atole.

Bronze colored colander filled with the remnants of the strained masa

How to Make Champurrado

Making champurrado is quite easy, the piloncillo and cinnamon are simmered in water until completely dissolved, then a Mexican chocolate tablet is added. Once the chocolate has melted into the piloncillo mixture the fresh masa is added. The masa thickens the chocolate creating a thick, sweet, and chocolatey drink. Then everything is frothed with a molinillo and served hot.

Masa liquid being poured into a saucepot

The Recipe: How to Make Champurrado

This authentic Mexican champurrado is made with water instead of milk, just like in pre-Columbian times.

  • If you want to use milk I recommend you use almond-coconut milk.
  • The recipe calls for fresh masa, but if you can’t find it you can use masa harina.
  • I’ve used Ibarra chocolate, but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate.
  • Enjoy!!

Chapurrado in a sauce pot being frothed with a molinillo

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it

Champurrado

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: champurrado, chocolate, vegan mexican
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4 cups
Calories: 96kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup Chopped piloncillo (2-4 oz.)
  • 1 Mexican Chocolate disk (I used Ibarra, chopped into 4 pieces)
  • ½ cup Fresh masa for tortillas (nixtamal)

Instructions

  • Place 3 cups of water, chopped piloncillo, and cinnamon stick in a medium sauce pot and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 1 to 2 minutes or until the piloncillo has completely dissolved.
  • Add the Mexican chocolate and continue to simmer and stir until chocolate has completely dissolved, about 3 minutes.
  • In the meantime place the fresh masa in a large bowl and pour 1 cup of water over the masa. Use your hand to dissolve the masa into the water.
  • Strain the masa liquid, and pour it into the simmering hot chocolate. Stir and froth with a molinillo or whisk.
  • Simmer for 6 to 8 minutes or until the champurrado has thickened. Serve hot!!

Notes

If you like your champurrado on the thick side use ¾ cup of fresh masa, but remember, the champurrado will continue to thicken as it cools. I used Ibarra chocolate but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate. If you can’t find fresh masa you can use 3/4 cup of masa harina.

Nutrition

Calories: 96kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 14mg | Potassium: 87mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 30IU | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 2mg

Have you ever had roasted acorn squash?? The roasting brings out the sweetness of the squash and it just begs to be filled with all sorts of veggie goodness. This quinoa stuffed acorn squash is studded with sautéed wild mushrooms and topped with a pipian rojo.

acorn squash on a sheet tray after being roasted

Pipian rojo is a hearty, stick to your ribs kind of sauce, made with roasted pumpkin seeds, roasted tomato, and dried pasilla, arbol, and ancho chiles. It pairs perfectly with the umami of the mushrooms and provides a touch of creaminess to the whole dish. The pipian is a recipe from the excellent book Decolonize Your Diet, which I highly recommend.

cooked quinoa in a silver pot

I was supposed to publish this recipe before Thanksgiving since it would make a great vegan Thanksgiving main course, but of course, life got in the way and I couldn’t publish it in time. We hosted Thanksgiving at our house this year, and it was so good to be surrounded by all the craziness and noise that family brings.

cooked quinoa and mushrooms in a saute pan

Our feast was a mix of both vegan and omni dishes. My husband (who is not vegan) was adamant that there needed to be turkey so we compromised and almost all the sides and desserts were vegan.This was my first time trying a vegan celebration roast!! I’m not going to lie, I was a little worried. I ended up buying two, the Gardein Holiday Roast and the Field Roast Hazelnut Cranberry Roast en Croute.

quinoa stuffed acorn squash and spoon pouring sauce on top of it

The Gardein Roast is more turkey-like and filled with sort of stuffing. The Field Roast Cranberry Roast is more sausage-like with ginger, cranberries, and apples. The baby and I enjoyed both of them very much. I was very surprised and thrilled when one of my sisters had celebration roast instead of turkey!! After trying both of them, I can’t decide which one I like best, they’re both really good. I do have to say that If you’re more into turkey-like meats then go with the Gardein Roast, if you’re more of a sausage person then go with the Field Roast. How great is it that vegans and vegetarians have so many delicious options available!I’m definitely getting a celebration roast for Christmas.

a fork in the quinoa stuffed acorn squash

 

The Recipe: Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash with Pipian Rojo

  • You can make the pipian rojo and the quinoa the day before to make this super fast.
  • If quinoa is not your favorite you can use rice instead.
  • Kabocha squash would also work really well with this recipe.
  • Wild mushrooms like maitake or oyster would make this dish even better.
quinoa stuffed acorn squash with pipian rojo on a white plate

Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash with Pipian Rojo

Quinoa stuffed acorn squash with sauteed mushrooms topped with a smoky pipian rojo and cilantro. A great centerpiece for any vegan feast.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: pipian rojo, quinoa, stuffed squash
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Acorn squash. cut in half, seeds removed
  • 1 cup Quinoa, raw, rinsed
  • 2 cups Vegetable stock
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • ¼ cup Water or (1 tbsp. of the oil of your choice)
  • ½ lb. Cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup Minced shallots
  • 1 cup Chopped raw greens, kale, spinach or swiss chard
  • 1 ½ cups Pipian Rojo
  • ¼ cup Chopped cilantro

Instructions

  • Preheat Oven to 400°F.
  • Place the squash, cut side down, on a sheet tray lined with parchment paper.
  • Roast for 30 min. flip the squash over, then continue roasting until tender about 20 more minutes. Remove from oven and set aside.
  • In the meantime, heat a medium pot to medium heat and add quinoa. Pour in vegetable stock and 1 tsp. of salt and stir. Bring mixture to a very low simmer, cover, and cook for 20 minutes or until the liquid has evaporated and the quinoa is tender.
  • Remove from heat and let sit in the pot for 6 minutes. Fluff with a fork and set aside.
  • Heat a large sauté pan to medium-high heat, add ¼ cup of water (or 1 tbsp. of oil) and cook the mushrooms until golden brown, about 6-7 minutes. If the mushrooms begin to stick, add a little bit of vegetable stock.
  • Lower heat to medium-low, and add shallots, cook for 3-4 minutes or until the shallots are tender.
  • Mix in the greens, and let them cook down, about 1-2 minutes.
  • Add the mushroom mixture to the quinoa in the pot, and mix well. Season to taste.
  • 10. Fill your acorn halves with the quinoa mixture and top with the pipian rojo, and chopped cilantro. Place plenty of extra pipian rojo on the table, because you will be coming back for more of this delicious sauce!

Notes

  • Instead of pipian rojo you could also use mole poblano.
  • You can make the pipian rojo and the quinoa the day before to make this super-fast.
  • If quinoa is not your favorite you can use rice instead.
  • Kabocha squash would also work really well with this recipe.
  • Wild mushrooms like maitake or oyster would make this dish even better.

 

 

 

 

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Tamales are probably one of my favorite things in the whole world!! If you want to learn how to make vegan tamales look no further. Unlike what you may think they are not difficult to make at all. They are a bit time consuming, but with some help from friends or family you can make a tamalada and enjoy vegan tamales all year.

I have searched the internet far and wide for the best vegan tamales out there so you don’t have to. Here are over 15 different recipes that you can use and adapt to your liking. Enjoy!!

Savory and Easy Vegan Tamales

Did you know there are both sweet and savory tamales? Here is a list of our favorite savory ones.

1. Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel                           dorastable.com

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed to perfection. What makes these so good is that the masa is spiced with guajillo chiles, coconut oil, and cumin. Find recipe HERE.

2. Jalapeño and Cactus Tamales

Jalapeño and cactus tamales on a white plate                                                                     nibblesandfeasts.com

These jalapeño and cactus tamales are super easy to make. Rather than stuffing each tamal individually, the pickled jalapeños and cooked cactus bits are added to the masa and mixed thoroughly, making the spreading so quick. (This recipe does call for chicken bouillon powder, but you can substitute for Better than Bouillon No Chicken Base.) Find the recipe HERE.

3. Sweet Potato, Spinach, and Black Bean Tamales

Chipotle sweet potato and black bean vegan tamales on a wooden board                                naturallyella.com

Sweet potato, black beans, and spinach simmered in a chipotle sauce. Smoky, sweet, and full of delicious goodness. This dough is seasoned with oregano and coconut oil. You can find the recipe HERE.

4. Vegan Green Corn Tamales

Vegan Green Corn Tamales on a white plate and a green background createdmindfully.com

Vegan Green Corn Tamales. These rich, spicy tamales are made with Hatch green chiles, fresh white corn, and masa harina. Wrapped in fresh corn leaves and steamed. You can find the recipe HERE.

5. Oil-Free Vegan Tamales

Oil-Free Tamales filled with black beans, sweet potatoes, and green chiles cut in half. brandnewvegan.com

Oil-Free Tamales filled with black beans, sweet potatoes, and green chiles in a New Mexican red chile sauce. Instead of oil the masa uses pureed corn, kind of genius! You can find the recipe HERE.

6. Potato and Pinto Bean Vegan Tamales

a vegan tamal topped with crema tomatoes and onion on a plate.               sweetsimplevegan.com  

These Potato and Pinto Bean vegan tamales are also filled Anaheim peppers and tomatoes, spiced with a touch if cumin and chili powder. The masa is made with extra-virgin olive oil. You can find the recipe HERE.

7. Low-Fat Vegan Tamales

A brown plate with a vegan tamal topped with salsa, surrounded by rice and beans.cheftographer.com

These tamales are filled with a black bean-zucchini stew, but the best part is that the masa has a secret ingredient. Instead of oil or shortening, it uses pumpkin puree to substitute the fat. They are healthy and delicious!! Find the recipe HERE.

8. Vegan Potato Adobo Tamales

Two vegan tamales on a wooden board, one cut open                                        dorastable.com

Vegan potato adobo tamales filled with a mixture of potatoes and peas tossed in a spicy adobo sauce. The adobo is smoky, spicy, tangy, and has an earthy quality to it. The masa that surrounds it, is fluffy and light, and it’s all wrapped in a corn husk and steamed until tender. (This recipe uses coconut oil in the masa.) Find the recipe HERE.

9. Jalapeño and Cheese Tamales

Tamales on Mexican clay plates on a dark backgroundmexicanmademeatless.com

Tender tamales stuffed with jalapeños, tomatoes, and cheese. This recipe is vegetarian, but can be easily veganized by using vegan cheese. Find the recipe HERE. 

10. Bean and Jalapeño Tamales

Three tamales topped with salsa verde over Mexican rice.              lapinaenlacocina.com

Bean and Jalapeño Tamales filled with beans stewed in chile ancho and spices, and pickled jalapeño peppers. The recipe does call for chicken stock, but you can easily substitute for vegetable stock. Yum!! Find the recipe HERE.

11. Zucchini and Corn Tamales

A large tamal with zucchini and corn on a blue plate.                                                      muybuenocookbook.com

Zucchini and Corn Tamales, a simple and delicious vegan tamal recipe, no filling required. The masa is studded with sweet corn and zucchini then wrapped in corn husks and steamed. (This recipe calls for chicken bouillon, but you can substitute forBetter than Bouillon No Chicken Base.) You can find the recipe HERE.

12. Easy Sweet Corn Tamales

A sweet corn tamal on a white plate with salsa and crema.                                  mexicoinmykitchen.com

Sweet Corn Tamales, made with fresh corn and a sprinkle of masa harina. These can be served as sweet tamales for dessert or as savory with spicy salsa and vegan crema. (The recipe calls for butter, but can be easily substituted for vegan butter.) You can find the recipe HERE.

Sweet and Easy Vegan Tamales

If you’ve never had sweet vegan tamales you’re in for a treat. It makes so much sense when you think about it, corn itself is so sweet that it only makes sense to enhance that sweetness with flavor like lime, strawberry, chocolate, and pumpkin.

13. Lime Tamales

a lime tamal on a white and green plate     thymeandlove.com

Lime Tamales are a traditional sweet tamal. For vegan sweet tamales, we use vegan butter and almond milk. A few easy swaps and traditional sweet Lime Tamales can be made vegan! You can find the recipe HERE.

14. Sweet Pineapple Tamales

Pineapple tamal on a black and white plate with a silver spoon      chefmarcela.com

Sweet Pineapple Tamales, soft and billowy and perfectly sweet and completely addictive. The masa is made with coconut oil, and vegetable shortening and studded with crushed pineapple. Find the recipe HERE.

15.  Strawberry Tamales

A pink tamal surrounded by strawberries on a blue plate.                                                        dorastable.com

These strawberry tamales are soft, tender packets of ground corn, filled with sweet strawberry jam. The aroma of the tamales steaming is irresistible. They are great with a mug of Mexican hot chocolate or an atole. Find the recipe HERE.

16. Pumpkin Pie Tamales

Pumpkin pie tamal bathed in syrup on a white plate     thymeandlove.com

Pumpkin Pie Tamales are a sweet dessert tamal inspired by the classic American Pumpkin Pie. Perfect for Dia de Los Muertos or Thanksgiving! Find the recipe HERE.

17. Vegan Chocolate Tamales

chocolate tamales on a blue kitchen towel      dorastable.com

These vegan chocolate tamales are filled with bittersweet chocolate chips, and chopped pecans. The best tamal is a warm tamal just out of the steamer with the scent of cinnamon and the melted bittersweet chocolate. Find the recipe HERE.

18. Vegan Tamales Unwrapped

vegan tamales ebook

You didn’t find the recipe you were looking for?? Vegan Tamales Unwrapped Ebook has over 50 detailed pictures, and will guide you step-by-step in the tamal making process. Make delicious savory and sweet tamales inspired by traditional Mexican cuisine, but all vegan and gluten-free. Including an oil-free option for making guilt-free plant-based tamales. You will be able to find recipes like jackfruit in salsa verde tamales. mushroom mole tamales, rajas con crema tamales, and blackberry tamales. Find out more HERE

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These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed to perfection. What makes these so good is that the masa is spiced with guajillo chiles, coconut oil, and cumin. They are so delicious and 100% vegan and gluten-free.

Jackfruit simmering in red chile sauce in a cast iron pan

These are the first tamales I ever learned how to make. Back when I didn’t know how to make tamales, my dad invited me to the family restaurant to learn. Over the years we had helped on several occasions with the spreading of the masa on the husk and the folding, but I had never done the whole process from start to finish. Tamales rojos are very typical of the northern Mexico, they are usually filled with pork and are very small in size, but with a pretty equal ratio of masa to filling.

Masa for tamales in a silver bowl

The thing about learning how to cook in a restaurant is that you learn how to make huge quantities of food. That day we must’ve made more than 200 tamales! Believe me, it was a few years before I decided to make tamales again all by myself. When I became vegan, I was very sad at the thought of not having good tamales again, and frankly the thought of tamales filled with veggies didn’t appeal to me at the moment.

Tamales wrapped in corn husk on a blue back ground

However, after some experimentation with jackfruit, I decided to veganize this recipe from the family restaurant. The result was shockingly similar to the original ones. So much so, that my omnivore husband was tricked into thinking that the tamales weren’t vegan!!

Tamales arranged in a steamer pot

This recipe is part of my ebook Vegan Tamales Unwrapped. After making these red chile jackfruit tamales I became so obsessed with making vegan tamales that I decided to make my obsession into an ebook. It has 50 detailed pictures on how to make vegan tamales from making the masa to spreading and wrapping.

vegan tamales ebook

Every possible aspect of tamal making is explored, the type of fats, wrappers, fillings, cooking methods. There’s even an option for oil free tamales. It includes both savory and sweet tamal recipes such as:

  • Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales
  • Mole Tamales
  • Salsa Verde Jackfruit Tamales
  • Chocolate Tamales
  • Strawberry Tamales
  • Lime Tamales

It is available for purchase on Amazon for $6.99. Sadly it is only available in ebook format, but if you don’t have a kindle you can also purchase it on itunes to read on your mac devices. I am so proud of this book and I know you will enjoy it too!

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel

The Recipe: Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

  • Masa harina is dried nixtamalized corn flour. It is used in Mexico to make tortillas, tamales, sopes, etc. The brand most commonly found is Maseca, but the only non-gmo organic one I’ve found is Bob’s Red Mill
  • I found coconut oil to be the most flavorful fat to use in this recipe. I recommend you use refined coconut oil so the coconut flavor doesn’t affect the tamales. If you use unrefined coconut oil you will get a coconutty flavor.
  • If you have a hard time finding jackfruit, (I find mine at Trader Joe’s) you can use mushrooms instead.
  • If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel

Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed until tender.
5 from 8 votes
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: vegan mexican recipes, vegan tamales
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 18 - 24 Tamales
Calories: 91kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Guajillo Chile Sauce

  • 20 (4 oz._ Guajillo chiles, dry, seeded
  • 3-4 Arbol chiles, dried, seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • 1/2 White onion, chopped
  • 2 cups Chile soaking liquid

Filling

  • 4 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans (20 oz.) Green jackfruit in brine
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce

Dough

  • 1 cup (8 oz.) Refined coconut oil, room temperature
  • 4 cups (1 lb. 2 oz.) Masa harina
  • 1 ½ tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Cumin, ground
  • 3 ½ cups Vegetable broth or stock
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce
  • 30 Corn husks

Instructions

To prepare the corn husks

  • Soak the corn husks in hot water, in a large pot or in your kitchen sink. Place a plate over them to weigh them down so they are completely submerged. Let them soak for at least an hour.

To make the sauce

  • Place the chiles in a small sauce pot and cover with water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and let cook for about 10 minutes. Drain the chiles and reserve 2 cups of the soaking liquid. Place the chiles, garlic, onion, and soaking liquid in the blender and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and strain. You should end up with about 3 cups of sauce.

To make the filling

  • Drain the jackfruit. Rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add minced garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring often. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes or until it begins to brown. Pour 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile sauce and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 20 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper and let cool.

To make the dough

  • Beat the coconut oil, on medium-high speed, with an electric mixer for 1 minute. Add the baking powder, cumin, salt, and beat for 1 minute to incorporate into the coconut oil.
  • Add half of the masa harina to the bowl, pour in half of the vegetable stock, and beat to incorporate. After it is completely incorporated, add the other half of masa harina, vegetable stock, and 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile puree. Beat at low speed, until thoroughly mixed. It should have the consistency of a thick cake batter. If necessary, add more vegetable stock until you reach that consistency. Taste the dough, and add more salt if necessary. It should be a little bit salty.
  • For lighter and fluffier tamales, let the dough rest for an hour in the refrigerator. Remove the dough from the fridge and rebeat it, adding enough liquid to get it to the consistency it had before.
  • Remove the corn husks from the water and set on paper towels. Reserve the largest husks to wrap the tamales and the small ones to line the steamer.

To set up your steamer

  • Fill the bottom with water making sure the water is not touching the steamer rack. Line the rack and sides of the steamer pot with corn husks. Set aside.

To wrap the tamales

  • Pull 24 pencil thin strips off of the corn husks and set aside. Take a husk and dry off the excess water with a paper towel. Place the husk in your hand with the tapered side away from you and the smooth side up. Using a spoon, spread 2-3 tbsp. of the dough (¼ inch thick) onto the corn husk, forming a 3 - 4 inch square. Leave a border of at least 3/4 inch on each side of the square.
  • Place 1 ½ tbsp. of the filling in the center of the dough. Bring the two long sides of the corn husk together, this will cause the masa to surround the filling, and roll them in the same direction around the tamal. (If the husk is too small, fold one of the long sides towards the center, and then fold the other long side on top.) Fold down the empty tapered section of the corn husk, forming a closed bottom. This will leave the top of the tamal open. Tie with a corn husk strip to secure the bottom of the tamal.
  •  Place the tamal in the steamer vertically leaning against the side of the pot, with the open end on top. Repeat this process until you run out of dough and all the tamales are in the steamer. Cover them with a layer of corn husks. If the steamer is not full, fill the empty spaces with more corn husks. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and cook for 40 minutes. Check the tamales, when they separate easily from the corn husk it means they are done. If they are not done, steam for 10 more minutes and check again.
  • Remove steamer from the heat and let sit covered for 10 minutes. Uncover and let cool for at least an hour. Don’t be alarmed if the tamales seem really soft. As they cool, they will firm up.

Video

Notes

If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Nutrition

Calories: 91kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 498mg | Potassium: 94mg | Fiber: 2g | Vitamin A: 320IU | Vitamin C: 0.9mg | Calcium: 58mg | Iron: 2mg


If you’ve never tried vegan pozole verde you’re in for a treat. Wild mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with creamy avocado, crisp lettuce and fresh radishes.

mushrooms cooking in a pot for vegan pozole verde

Pozole is a dish of pre-hispanic origins, the name pozole comes from the Nahuatl word “pozolli” which means ‘frothy’. Which refers to the appearance of the white corn as it’s boiled. It was a dish reserved for special celebrations and religious ceremonies. Legend has it that it was made with human flesh, as an offering to the gods for a fruitful harvest. (Gross!)

pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, cilantro and poblano in blender for vegan pozole verde

Nowadays, there are actually 3 most common types of pozole: rojo, blanco and verde. Red pozole is seasoned with a mixture of dried chiles, white pozole is seasoned with herbs, and green pozole usually contains pumpkins seeds, tomatillos, and green chiles.

Smooth green sauce in blender for vegan pozole verde

The recipe varies according to the state that you’re in. For pozole verde you can find a version from Jalisco, one from Guerrero, and one from Guanajuato.  They are all very similar with small variations like adding poblano peppers, or the toppings change from state to state.

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

I loved the addition of pumpkin seeds to this vegan pozole verde, because it adds a touch of creaminess to the broth without using oil or cream. You can make this pozole anytime, but it would be a great addition to your Christmas or Thanksgiving menus.

I’m not going to lie, I enjoyed this so much I ate the whole batch myself in a couple of days! I hope you like it too.

The Recipe: Vegan Pozole Verde

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of Serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.
  • Enjoy

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Vegan Pozole Verde

Vegan pozole verde, mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with avocado, lettuce and radishes.
4.75 from 4 votes
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Course: Main Course, Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: pozole verde, vegan pozole
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 375kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 1 ½ lb. Maitake or oyster mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup Diced onion
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ cup Raw pumpkin seeds, pepitas
  • 2 Poblano peppers
  • 3-4 Serrano peppers
  • 4 Tomatillos, medium
  • 1/2 cup Chopped cilantro
  • 1 cup Leafy greens, spinach, radish greens, swiss chard
  • 1 sprig Epazote
  • ¼ tsp. Cumin, ground
  • ¼ tsp. Mexican oregano, dried
  • 2 qts. Vegetable stock
  • 1 can (29oz) White hominy 29 oz, drained, and rinsed

Garnishes:

  • 1 Avocado, pitted and diced
  • 4 Red radishes, sliced
  • ½ Head Romaine or iceberg lettuce, finely shredded (julienned)
  • 4 Tostadas

Instructions

  • In a large pot set to medium heat sauté the mushrooms in 1 tbsp. of oil until golden brown about 6-8 min.
  • While the mushrooms are cooking, toast the pumpkin seeds lightly in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • Remove the mushrooms from the pot, and add the onions. Turn heat down to medium-low and sweat onions until tender and transparent about 4-5 minutes.
  • Add garlic and cook for two more minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot. Pour in the vegetable stock and hominy and simmer softly until you are ready to add the sauce.
  • Turn oven broiler on to HI setting.
  • Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, and tomatillos on a sheet tray lined with foil. Place under the broiler for 3 minutes or until the peppers have begun to get dark spots. Flip the peppers and tomatillos over and let cook for 3 more minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  • Place the poblano peppers in bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit 5 minutes.
  • Peel poblano peppers and remove the stems and seeds.
  • Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, greens, epazote, cilantro, cumin, and oregano in a blender and process until smooth.
  • 10. Strain the sauce into a medium sauce pot set to medium-low heat. Let sauce simmer for 5-6 minutes or until it changes to a darker green color.
  • 11. Pour sauce into the pot with the mushrooms and hominy and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 8-10 minutes, and season with salt and pepper.
  • 12. Serve with garnishes.

Notes

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.

Nutrition

Calories: 375kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 2053mg | Potassium: 1460mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 2605IU | Vitamin C: 66.7mg | Calcium: 70mg | Iron: 5.1mg
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It’s the irresistible aroma of chocolate and cinnamon that I first think of when I’m offered hot chocolate. Mexican hot chocolate is not your ordinary cacao powder and milk, oh no, and somebody needs to say this, but adding cinnamon to your hot chocolate does not make it Mexican. It is one of my culinary pet peeves. So what are the best vegan Mexican chocolate brands and what makes them so different?

Find out which is the best Mexican hot chocolate.

 

Not only that it comes from Mexico, but the process used to make it is unique in itself. Mexican chocolate for beverages is sold in tablets not powder, it is made by toasting, and grinding cacao beans with sugar, vanilla, and cinnamon. It is then packed into a mold and formed into a tablet. To make into a beverage simply dissolve a couple of pieces of the tablet in hot milk. If the chocolate is of high quality you can dissolve it in water, milk is not necessary. The video below, from Saveur.com shows you exactly how chocolate tablets are made in Mexico.

 

 

The Best Vegan Brand of Mexican Chocolate

There are four Mexican chocolate brands most commonly available in the US: Abuelita, Ibarra, Hernan, and Taza. We tested all four of them for you with Almond-coconut milk.

These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

Best Overall:

Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is made with stone-ground ORGANIC cocoa beans from a bio-diversified plantation in Chiapas. It is made in Mexico and imported into the US. I found Hernán to have the most authentic flavor and quality. It has a strong chocolate flavor, but it is not overpowering. It is the tight amount of sweet, and the foam is thick and a bit airy. It contains only four ingredients: cacao beans, sugar, cinnamon, and soy lecithin. The downfall is that it is available mostly online and in select stores. The price is reasonable for the quality of the chocolate at $10 for a box of 6 tablillas (6 cups of hot chocolate).

 

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Second Best: Taza Chocolate 

Taza is produced here in the US using the same process described in the video above. It is intensely chocolaty, aromatic, not too sweet, but with a hint of bitterness. The foam is thick, not at all airy. It contains only three ingredients: cacao beans, sugar, and cinnamon. It is also certified USDA organic, non-GMO, certified gluten-free, and vegan. The only downside is the price, $5.oo. It really isn’t too expensive, but one package will only make you two cups of hot chocolate.

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Best Budget-Friendly Chocolate: Ibarra

Ibarra is the one we buy more often, and it is a Mexican product. It has a medium chocolate flavor intensity and it is pretty sweet. There is no bitterness to it at all. The foam is airy and firm. It contains cocoa liquor, sugar, soy lecithin, and cinnamon flavoring. The price, $3.50, and it makes 24 cups of hot chocolate.

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Last but Not Least: Abuelita

I contacted Nestle and they confirmed that it is NOT vegan.

NOTE: Even though Nestle has said that the product is not vegan certified, there are no animal products on the ingredient list. After further inquiry this is what Nestle responded: “The evaluation for vegan claims has not been performed on this item. We therefore would advise that the product is not suitable for vegans.” 

I leave it up to yo whether you want to try it or not. That being said, Abuelita has a special place in my heart, it evokes a lot memories for me and it is extremely popular in Mexico. It has a medium chocolate flavor, is very sweet, and has no bitterness. The cinnamon flavor is strong and fragrant. The foam is airy and very firm. The downside is that it contains additives like vegetable oils, artificial flavor, and PGPR. The price, $3.25, and it makes 24 cups of chocolate.

Regardless of which one you think is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate, I urge to give Mexican hot chocolate a try. You won’t be disappointed. What is your favorite brand?

 

 

 

 

 

This habanero hearts of palm ceviche will transport you to the Mexican Caribbean with the combination of habanero, hearts of palm, onion, tomato, and cilantro marinated in lime juice. You can serve it on tostadas, eat with chips or even serve it as a salad. Hearts of palm is a great option for making vegan ceviche, it has a flaky texture but a firm bite, and it absorbs perfectly the flavors of the marinade.

Ingredients for hearts of palm ceviche in a glass bowl.

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of  the Mexican union. With this project I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S. and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet.

Ingredients for hearts of palm ceviche in a glass bowl.

This recipe is by Alessandro Scetta an Italian vegan chef who has lived in Cancun for more than 15 years, and his recipe is representing Quintana Roo. Quintana Roo is a southern Mexican state bordered by the Caribbean ocean, full of amazing beaches, ruins, and a seafood dominated cuisine.

Ingredients for hearts of palm ceviche in a glass bowl mixed

It is a popular tourist destination, as it is where Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and Cancún are located. Alessandro has transformed the classic Quintana Roo conch ceviche into this delicious and refreshing vegan hearts of palm ceviche.

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

Alessandro’s Vegan Journey

My name is Alessandro Scetta, and I am Italian, born in Naples, and I have been living in Cancún for the last 15 years. I have been vegan since 2013, a decision that I made for health reasons. However, my eyes were quickly opened to the great animal suffering that is behind the meat, dairy, and entertainment industry, and many others.

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

Now I can say with certainty that I am vegan for the animals, but of course my health has also received incredible benefits. And since cooking is my thing, I dedicated myself to veganizing a lot of the dishes of my homeland, and of course my second homeland, Mexico. All this so I could tell my family and friends……you can still eat delicious and mouthwatering meals without having to eat animals, plus your health and the planet will benefit.

¿My favorite ingredient? Eggplant
¿My favorite Mexican dish? Chiles en Nogada (vegan of course)
¿Mi favorite regional Mexican cuisine? Yucatán cuisine

You can follow Alessandro on Facebook: @CocinaUrbanaVegana and Instagram: @alessandro_scetta

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

The Recipe: Habanero Hearts of Palm Ceviche

This recipe is really easy!! Combine all the ingredients let marinate and you’re set to go.

  • You might have to try several brands of hearts of palm and see which one you like best. Some are more tender than others.
  • The recipe calls for 1 whole habanero, but if you don’t eat a lot of spicy food I would only use 1/2 or even a 1/3 of a pepper.
  • Oil is optional.

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

Habanero Hearts of Palm Ceviche

This vegan hearts of palm ceviche will transport you to Mexico with the combination of habanero, lime juice, tomato, onion and hearts of palm 
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Appetizer, Salad
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: heartsofpalm, veganceviche, veganmexican
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 4 Servings
Calories: 115kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (14 oz.) Hearts of palm, drained
  • 3 Plum tomatoes, pulp removed, diced
  • ½ Red onion, finely diced
  • 1 Habanero pepper, finely diced
  • 2 tbsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • 3 tbsp. Extra virgin olive oil (optional)
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped cilantro or to taste

Instructions

  • Cut the hearts of palm in slices or half-moon pieces.
  • In a large bowl, combine the hearts of palm, tomato, onion, and habanero pepper.
  • Add the lime juice, olive oil, and cilantro. Mix well. (Hold off on seasoning it.)
  • Let marinate in the refrigerator for 30 min.
  • Season with salt and mix to combine.
  • Serve with chips or tostadas.

Video

Notes

You might have to try several brands of hearts of palm and see which one you like best. Some are more tender than others. The recipe calls for 1 whole habanero, but if you don't eat a lot of spicy food I would add 1/2 or even a 1/3 of a pepper. Oil is optional. Avocado would go really well with this.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 115kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 253mg | Potassium: 213mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 835IU | Vitamin C: 16.3mg | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 0.3mg

Here are some more delicious vegan ceviche recipes:

Cauliflower Ceviche

Hearts of Palm Aguachile

 

Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

This Mexican hot chocolate ice cream is sweet and creamy with a hint of cinnamon. It might be the combination of my two favorite things Mexican hot chocolate and ice cream. For this recipe I’ve used my new favorite chocolate, Hernán. I found out about Hernan at a local festival here in San Antonio and I instantly fell in love with their all-natural, vegan products.

mexican hot chocolate tablillas in milk

Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is made with stone-ground ORGANIC cocoa beans from a bio-diversified plantation in Chiapas! The chocolate is available in tablillas or shaped into calaveras (chocolate skulls). It has become my favorite chocolates, because in the US it is becoming very hard to find Mexican hot chocolate without artificial flavors or oils.

mexican hot chocolate skulls

 

Plus it’s a local business run by a fellow Mexican and entrepreneur, Isela Hernández  who is crafting these products in partnership with artisan groups and producers in Mexico!

blended mexican hot chocolate for ice cream

I have been experimenting with the chocolate and have made Mexican hot chocolate paletas, so it only seemed natural to try and use it to make ice cream.

I love ice cream and with so many dairy free alternatives on the market it’s not as difficult to find a good vegan ice cream (my favorite brand is Nadamoo). I do wish there were more Mexican or Latino inspired flavors like this Mexican hot chocolate ice cream, or other flavors like jamaica, horchata, arroz con leche, and cajeta.

These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

 

I used to have an ice cream maker, which I loved, but I had to let go of in the move from Hawaii to Texas. I figured I could just buy a new one instead of paying to ship the one I had, but then I never did. So I have made this recipe no-churn, but if you have an ice cream machine you can use it as well.

The Recipe: Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate Ice Cream

  • I tried several different types of milk for this and my favorite was almond-coconut or soy.
  • I have added avocado for creaminess, but don’t worry the taste blends in perfectly with the chocolate.
  • You can use the sweetener of your choice.
  • If you have an ice cream machine, cool down the chocolate mixture then add to your machine. You can skip the steps 4,5 and 6
  • Enjoy!!

Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate Ice Cream

This Mexican hot chocolate ice cream is sweet and creamy with a hint of cinnamon. It is also no-churn and dairy free!!
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chipotle pasta, vegan pastas, ice cream, mexican hot chocolate, no-churn
Prep Time: 10 minutes
1 day
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4 servings (1 quart)
Calories: 247kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablets (tablillas) Hernan Mexican chocolate
  • 2 cups Almond-coconut milk unsweetened
  • 1 Avocado ripe, cut in half, flesh removed
  • ¼ cup Maple syrup

Instructions

  • Bring the coconut-almond milk to a very low simmer over low heat. Add chocolate tablets, and stir with a whisk or molinillo.
  • Once the chocolate has dissolved pour it in a container and let it cool completely in the fridge or freezer.
  • Place the chocolate mixture, avocado, and maple syrup in the blender, and puree until smooth.
  • Pour into ice trays and freeze overnight.
  • The following day unmold the cubes and place in the food processor. Process until smooth (hold on to your food processor because it’s going to shake!)
  • Eat right away and enjoy!!

Video

Notes

  • I tried several different types of milk for this and my favorite was almond-coconut or soy.
  • I have added avocado for creaminess, but don't worry the taste blends in perfectly with the chocolate.
  • You can use the sweetener of your choice.
  • If you have an ice cream machine, cool down the chocolate mixture then add to your machine. You can skip the steps 4, 5, 6.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Serving | Calories: 247kcal | Carbohydrates: 33g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 175mg | Potassium: 288mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 27g | Vitamin A: 75IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 178mg | Iron: 0.3mg