This frozen prickly pear margarita is made with fresh prickly pear, lime juice, Cointreau, and tequila. It is refreshing, slightly sweet, and a beautiful bright pink color.Prickly pear fruit is native to Mexico and South America, but it can be found in France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Egypt, and parts of the Middle East. It is known for its thick spiny skin and soft, sweet, & watery interior. There are many varieties, but the most well known are green, red, yellow, brown and pink.

red prickly pear used for prickly pear margaritas

red prickly pear used for prickly pear margaritas

It’s the perfect summer fruit, it tastes like a weird combination of pear, cucumber, watermelon and pineapple. It has only one monstrous defect, besides the tiny spines that line its exterior, the flesh of the fruit is riddled with seeds. It is commonly used to make drinks, candy, or jelly.

red prickly pear used for prickly pear margaritas

You can find them at your local Mexican or Hispanic market. They are in season from early spring to late fall. To prepare them, use a paring knife to cut off both ends of the fruit and make a 1/4 of an inch deep cut lengthwise. Please, please, please wear gloves when working with this fruit.

red prickly pear used for prickly pear margaritas

Even though you can find them without the large spines at the store, the tiny and almost hair like spines remain and can get lodged in your flesh. They truly are tiny! Place your finger in between the flesh and the outer skin and simply pull back, the outer layer should come off easily. You can store them in your refrigerator for up to a week or at room temperature if you are going to eat them in one or two days.

red prickly pear used for prickly pear margaritas

Peeled prickly pears in a blender

Have I mentioned I love tequila? I know some of you must be fighting back your gag reflex just thinking about tequila, but not me. Tequila and I go way back, but that’s another story, preferably one told while drinking tequila. After you try this prickly pear margarita you might reconsider your aversion to tequila, at least I hope you do.

Prickly pear juice being strained

 

As far as tequila goes, we usually drink Corralejo, Don Juilo, or Clase Azul, but this time we used Cazadores which is a great option for those who don’t want to spend a lot of money. As for margaritas, I’m happy to see more bars have stopped using sour mix and creating their own flavored syrups and liquors. Did you know, margaritas in Mexico are made with lime juice, tequila, and triple sec or Cointreau? That’s it! Even if this is your first time using prickly pear, you are going to love this margarita.

This recipe for frozen prickly pear margarita is the perfect drink to cool down. The combination of tequila prickly pear fruit, and orange liqueur is irresistible

The Recipe: Prickly Pear Margarita

  • You can add agave syrup to sweeten the margarita if you prefer your margaritas on the sweet side.
  • You can also use green prickly pear.
  • Enjoy!!

Frozen prickly pear margarita in large margarita glass

This recipe for frozen prickly pear margarita is the perfect drink to cool down. The combination of tequila prickly pear fruit, and orange liqueur is irresistible
5 from 1 vote
Print

Frozen Prickly Pear Margarita

Frozen Prickly pear margarita, a refreshing way to cool down this summer. 

Course Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword frozen, margarita, prickly pear
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 2 Large Margaritas
483 kcal
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Red prickly pears, peeled
  • ¾ cup Tequila, reposado
  • ½ cup Cointreau,
  • ¼ cup + 1 tbsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • 2 cups Ice As Needed

Preparation

  1. Blend prickly pears on low for 60 seconds. Then blend on high for 30 seconds. Strain. Set liquid aside.
  2. Pour tequila, Cointreau, lime juice, and prickly pear juice in blender. Add ice and blend on high.
  3. Serve in two salt rimmed glasses.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you would like to sweeten this margarita add 1/4 cup of agave nectar. Start with two cups of ice, but add as much as you need.

Nutrition Facts
Frozen Prickly Pear Margarita
Amount Per Serving (2 margaritas)
Calories 483
% Daily Value*
Sodium 10mg 0%
Potassium 473mg 14%
Total Carbohydrates 76g 25%
Dietary Fiber 11g 44%
Sugars 54g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 1.8%
Vitamin C 32%
Calcium 3.7%
Iron 3.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

I am so excited to share with amazing book with you. Vegan Yack Attack on the Go, is the first vegan cookbook that I’ve browsed through and immediately though,”I want to make all these recipes!” This recipe for roasted butternut squash and mushroom tacos is one of my favorites from the book. The author is Jackie Sobon from the vegan blog Vegan Yack Attack.

Butternut squash, mushrooms, black beans and tomatillos on a sheetpan.

The best part is that it is a quick recipe that requires only a sheet pan. All you have to do is chop, toss, and roast and the next thing you know dinner is on the table. I love the combination of butternut squash and black beans, and when you add mushrooms and spices it all comes together perfectly.

vegan yack attack on the go cookbook

Even though it is not a traditional Mexican recipe I wanted to share it with you, because it’s delicious and easy to make. I served mine on warm corn tortillas, but you can definitely make a burrito out of it, or it would make a good filling for enchiladas.

roasted butternut squash, black beans, and mushrooms

So why I am I so excited about this book?? Honestly a lot of vegan cookbooks have the same recipes with a little bit of variation, not this one. There are a few classics like smoothies, burritos, and pasta, but there are so many other great recipes like the creamy berry polenta, asparagus omelette, coconut BLT, and the vanilla chip buckwheat bars.

butternut squash and mushroom tacos on a plate

My favorite part of the book is that the recipes are quick to make, which is absolutely a must when you have 3 kids and work from home. There’s even a section for camping or cookout foods that is just genius, like the campfire banana split. I highly recommend this book. What are you waiting for??? Go check it out .

butternut squash and mushroom tacos with salsa verde, jalapeño and lime

The Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos

  • You can use baby bella or portabello mushrooms.
  • This recipe would also work with acorn or hubbard squash
  • I love the black beans in this, but pinto beans would work also.
  • Use chile ancho powder instead of a regular chili powder for a deeper smoky flavor
  • Enjoy!!
butternut squash and mushroom tacos, jalapeño and lime
5 from 1 vote
Print

Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos

Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos, an easy and delicious weeknight dinner everyone will love!

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword black beans, butternut squash and mushroom tacos, vegan tacos
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Diced and peeled, butternut squash
  • 2 cups Chopped baby bella mushrooms
  • 1 can (15 oz.) Black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup Chopped yellow onion
  • 1 tbsp. Sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp. Chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt, or more to taste
  • 1/4 tsp. Paprika
  • Pinch Cayenne Pepper
  • 2 cups Chopped tomatillos, with husks removed
  • 8 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Shredded cabbage
  • 1 Jalapeño, thinly sliced
  • 8 Small lime wedges

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6), and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  2. Place the butternut squash, mushrooms, black beans, and yellow onions in a mixing bowl. Drizzle with oil and toss to coat, then add the chili powder, cumin, salt, oregano, paprika, and cayenne pepper, and toss again. Spread the mixture out on the baking sheet, leaving some space for the tomatillos.
  3. Place the tomatillos on the remainder of the baking sheet, then place in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the squash is fork tender. Sprinkle with more salt to taste, if desired.
  4. Warm the tortillas in either the microwave or on a hot pan until soft and pliable. Fill each one with some butternut– black bean mixture, then top with tomatillos, shredded cabbage, and jalapeño slices. Serve warm, accompanied by lime wedges.

Chef's Notes

  • You can use baby bella or portabello mushrooms.
  • This recipe would also work with acorn or hubbard squash
  • I love the black beans in this, but pinto beans would work also.
  • Use chile ancho powder instead of a regular chili powder for a deeper smoky flavor
Nutrition Facts
Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 338 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Sodium 702mg 29%
Potassium 1123mg 32%
Total Carbohydrates 62g 21%
Dietary Fiber 15g 60%
Sugars 8g
Protein 13g 26%
Vitamin A 161.8%
Vitamin C 44.8%
Calcium 10.6%
Iron 14.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 338 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Sodium 702mg 29%
Potassium 1123mg 32%
Total Carbohydrates 62g 21%
Dietary Fiber 15g 60%
Sugars 8g
Protein 13g 26%
Vitamin A 161.8%
Vitamin C 44.8%
Calcium 10.6%
Iron 14.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema. They are crazy easy to make, and are so good you’ll be making them again and again.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

In Mexico these are known simply as encacahuatadas, and are a classic home cooked dish. They are usually filled with chicken, but your favorite vegetable filling will go great with these. They would make a great dinner, or even a good brunch option.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Let me just say that I am obsessed with this sauce. I have been putting it on everything! So far it is perfect with the enchiladas, but you can also put it on your baked potatoes, polenta, pasta, tacos, buddha bowls, and tofu. I’m one of those people that falls in love with a sauce or dish and then I makes it over and over again until I get tired it. This is one of those sauces. So you definitely have to try it.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Summer is coming up and I am so not ready to have all the kids home. Not ready!! The first couple of weeks are always a little rough, but once we get into a groove we really have fun. My two older ones are always arguing and bothering each other, which can get really stressful sometimes, but our sweet baby is always all smiles. What are some of your summer plans?? I’ll tell you what I am ready for, all the delicious summer fruit. 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

The Recipe: Spicy Peanut Sauce Enchiladas

  • Your favorite veggie filling will be perfect with these
  • If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds.
  • Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.
  • You can use cashew or almond crema
  • Do not place these in the oven because they will fall apart.

 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
4 from 1 vote
Print

Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword peanut enchiladas, spicy peanut sauce, vegan enchiladas
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
387 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 8 Guajillo Chiles stems and seeds removed, rinsed
  • 1-2 Chipotle pepper in adobo
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • 1 cup Peanuts, toasted
  • 1 Plum tomato, roasted
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground clove
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Filling

  • 1 lb. Mushrooms. cremini sliced
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 oz. Spinach or other leafy green, roughly chopped
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Almond crema

Preparation

To make the peanut sauce:

  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Drop in the guajillo chiles and turn heat down to a simmer, let simmer for 10 min.
  2. Drain guajillo chiles and place in blender with peanuts, chipotle chiles, garlic, roasted tomato, clove, and vegetable stock. Blend until smooth. If necessary add more stock until you reach the desired consistency.If you do not have a high powered blender, strain the sauce. Set aside.

To make the filling:

  1. Add ¼ cup of water or vegetable stock to a large sauté pan set to medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until almost all the moisture has evaporated from the mushrooms and they are beginning to brown. Add more liquid if necessary.
  2. Lower heat to medium-low and add the garlic, cook for 1 min. Add the spinach and stir. Cover pan and let spinach cook down, 2 -3 minutes. Add hominy and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

To assemble

  1. Bring a medium sauce pot to low-medium heat and pour in sauce. Heat just enough to get it hot. If it simmers, the sauce might break.
  2. Warm corn tortillas in the microwave for 30 seconds or in the oven at 350F on a sheet tray for 5 min. Just enough so that the tortillas are soft enough to be rolled.
  3. Spread 2-3 tbsp. of the peanut sauce on the bottom of a 9 x13 baking dish, Place 1 tbsp. of filling on each tortilla. Roll and place on baking dish. Continue this process until you have used up all the tortillas and the entire filling.
  4. Pour the rest of the peanut sauce on top of the enchiladas and drizzle almond crema on top.

Chef's Notes

If the sauce and the filling are hot there is no need to put the enchiladas in the oven. If you would rather place them in the oven do so at 350°F for 5-7 minutes. If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds. Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.

Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10g 15%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Sodium 648mg 27%
Potassium 1392mg 40%
Total Carbohydrates 57g 19%
Dietary Fiber 12g 48%
Sugars 8g
Protein 18g 36%
Vitamin A 149.8%
Vitamin C 26.4%
Calcium 17%
Iron 23.8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10g 15%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Sodium 648mg 27%
Potassium 1392mg 40%
Total Carbohydrates 57g 19%
Dietary Fiber 12g 48%
Sugars 8g
Protein 18g 36%
Vitamin A 149.8%
Vitamin C 26.4%
Calcium 17%
Iron 23.8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Every country across the world has its own way of celebrating Christmas. Mexico has many wonderful Christmas traditions, but one of the most important is the food. It’s not Christmas without pozole, tamales, buñuelos, or ponche. Another one of those important dishes is this vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína.

This post contains affiliate links.

Bacalao a la Vizcaína is a braised salt cod dish with tomatoes, garlic, olives, capers, roasted peppers, and potatoes. Depending what part of the country you are in they also add raisins and slivered almonds. For this vegan version I️ have used hearts of palm and artichoke hearts to replace the salt cod. The dish is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is mostly consumed in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve. Serve it with rice or crusty bread to soak up to the last drop of the stew.

What are some of your favorite Christmas foods? My favorite is without a doubt tamales, and the are super easy to veganize! My favorite Christmas traditions are decorating the tree as a family, pedir posada, and singing Happy birthday to Jesus, and then having the kids kiss little baby Jesus on Christmas Eve. Ok, so there’s a lot of stuff I️ like about Christmas! I️ would love to hear some of your traditions.

The Recipe: Vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína

I have used one can of hearts of palm and one can of artichoke hearts, but feel free to use one or the other. To give this a fishy flavor you can use dulse flakes or finely chopped nori seaweed. Enjoy!

This vegan bacalao a la vizcaína is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is served in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve.
5 from 1 vote
Print

Vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína

This vegan bacalao a la vizcaína is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is served in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 3 minutes
Servings 6 Servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 10 Plum tomatoes, medium, (3 cups roasted tomato puree)
  • 1 White onion, diced, (about 2 cups)
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 can (14 oz.) Artichoke hearts, drained, roughly chopped
  • 1 can (14 oz.) Hearts of palm, drained, roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup Sliced, pitted manzanilla olives
  • 1 tbsp. Capers
  • 3 Red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1-2 tsp. Finely chopped nori flakes
  • 1 lb. New potatoes, cooked, peeled, cut in half
  • 1/4 cup Parsley, chopped
  • 3 Pickled pepperoni or banana peppers whole or sliced

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven broiler to HI. Place tomatoes on a sheet try and place under the broiler for 4 minutes, until the tomatoes begin to brown and be covered in black spots.
  2. Turn the tomatoes and leave in oven for 4 more minutes. Remove from oven. Using your blender, process until you have a smooth puree. Strain and set aside.
  3. Heat a large pot to medium-low heat and add ¼ cup of water. Add onions and let cook until tender and transparent, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, and cook for 1 more minute.
  4. Pour in tomato puree, and bring it up to a simmer.
  5. Add hearts of palm, artichoke hearts, olives, capers, red peppers, bay leaf, and nori flakes. Continue to simmer for 5-6 minutes. Stir well.
  6. Add parsley, potatoes, pickled banana peppers. Let simmer for 8 more minutes. If the sauce thickens too much, adjust with vegetable stock or water.
  7. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Chef's Notes

If you are looking for a fishy taste use 2 tsp. of nori flakes. Serve with rice or crusty bread. The pickled pepper can be spicy or mild depending on your preference. In some states they add raisins and slivered almonds, you can add those as well. 

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through, and make a purchase. Thank you for your support!

 

I never liked atole as a child, probably because we would have those artificially flavored packets of Maizena atole. This almond atole is something completely different. Almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina combine to make this a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.

Atole is a drink from pre-hispanic times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. It was drank by the indigenous people of Mexico for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water, and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. It is available all year, but is especially popular in the winter months.

Currently, atole is also made with cornstarch, rice flour, oat flour, or barley. Its consistency ranges from thin and milky, to very thick.  It is drank on special occasions like the Day of the Dead, Christmas, baptism, first communions, weddings, and feast days. Tamales and atole is classic pairing and one you should definitely try.

While doing research on atole I happened to find that almond atole is a favorite of my home state, Coahuila. I had never tried it before, so I decided to give it a try. I was pleasantly surprised at how delicious it was, and nothing like the packaged version of atole that you can find at Mexican grocery stores. Like always, I made way too much of it, and saved what we didn’t drink in the fridge. The next day I served it to the kids for breakfast, almost like a porridge, and they ate it all up.

The Recipe: Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. You can buy fresh masa at some tortillerias or Mexican groceries. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well. I haven’t made this recipe too sweet, so feel free to sweeten it up. ¡Enjoy!

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.
4 from 1 vote
Print

Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage
Total Time 25 minutes
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 stick Ceylon cinnamon
  • 1 cup Masa harina, maseca
  • 1 ½ cups Raw Almonds or (1 2/3 cup almond meal)
  • ½-3/4 cup Piloncillo, brown sugar or maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon

Preparation

  1. Heat almond milk in a medium sauce pot, bring to a simmer.
  2. While the milk comes to a simmer, grind the almonds in your blender until they resemble a powder. Set aside.
  3. Dissolve the masa harina in a little bit of water.
  4. Add the masa harina to the almond milk, and mix well.
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes, stirring to make sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.
  6. Add the ground almonds, cinnamon, and piloncillo to the saucepot. Simmer at very low heat for 15 minutes. Stir well.
  7. Serve hot. As it cools it will thicken, so add more almond milk if necessary.

Chef's Notes

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well.

 

 

The Day of the Dead is a celebration of life, and a mocking of death and the power it holds over us. The indigenous people of Mexico believed that death was not an end, but a passageway to another life. El Día de los Muertos is a homecoming festival, where we receive our loved ones with open arms, and party like only Mexicans now how to, with food, color, music, and dance.

 

Altars are used to honor those that have departed, and there are many traditional elements that must come together to create an altar worthy of our ancestors. One of these elements are candy skulls.The use of sugar or amaranth skulls can be traced back to pre-hispanic times, and historians believe that human blood might have been used to form the amaranth skulls. Today you can find colorfully decorated skulls made out of sugar, honey and amaranth, and chocolate and amaranth.

Over the years I have slowly found ways to veganize some of our food traditions. We have made vegan pan de muerto, sugar skulls, and candied pumpkin. This year we made vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls, which are decorated with colorful royal icing, are very easy to do, and are quite delicious! Unlike the sugar skulls which are used mostly for decorations, these are meant to be eaten.

To make these you will need a skull mold, vegan semi-sweet chocolate chips, and popped amaranth. You can pop the amaranth yourself, or you can buy it already popped. I found mine at a Mexican candy store and ended up buying way too much! The chocolate takes about 30 minutes to set, and they hold for up to 3 days if you store in an air tight container.

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate and Amaranth Skulls

For the vegan chocolate you can use the enjoy life brand which is certified vegan or Guittards, if none of those are available in your area, there are other options. I bought my skull molds on mexicansugarskulls.com. Enjoy!

Vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls for the day of the dead with colorful royal icing, very easy to do, and are quite delicious!
5 from 2 votes
Print

Vegan Chocolate and Amaranth Skulls

Vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls for the day of the dead with colorful royal icing, very easy to do, and are quite delicious! 
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 4 large skulls (front only)
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Vegan Semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 3 1/4 cups Popped amaranth

Royal Icing

  • 3 floz. Aquafaba (liquid from a can of chickpeas) (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp.)
  • 4-5 cups Powdered sugar
  • 4 Food coloring of choice

Equipment

  • 1 Skull mold
  • 4 Pieces of cardboard (4.5 X 4.5 inches)
  • 4 Disposable piping bags

Preparation

  1. Place the chocolate chips in a large bowl and melt over a double boiler until all the chocolate has melted. You can also melt it in 30 sec. intervals in the microwave, making sure to stir between each interval.

  2. Pour popped amaranth into the bowl with the chocolate and mix well. with a wooden spoon, to incorporate.

  3. Wet the mold a little bit with a moistened paper towel and press the amaranth chocolate mix into the mold. 

  4. Press the cardboard square against the mold and flip the mold, to have the skull facing you. Lift the mold, and carefully place the cardboard with the skull on it on a sheet tray.
  5. Repeat this process with the rest of the mix. Let chocolate set for 30 min.

Royal Icing

  1. While de chocolate is setting, in a large bowl, lightly beat the aquafaba until it starts to bubble. Add 4 cups of the powdered sugar and mix well. Test the consistency of the icing on a plate. It should be thick enough that it doesn’t slide down the plate easily. If it seems too thin, add 1 more cup of powdered sugar. The consistency should be considerably thicker than the icing used to decorate cookies.

  2. Separate the icing into 4 small bowls. Add your food coloring of choice and mix well.
  3. Pour each bowl of icing into a disposable piping bag. Secure with a rubber band, and cut a tiny bit off of the tip of the bag. Test the amount of icing that comes out before decorating your skull.
  4. Decorate your skull however you desire. The icing will take about 30 min. to set.

Chef's Notes

For the vegan chocolate you can use the enjoy life brand which is certified vegan or Guittards, if none of those are available in your area, there are other options. I bought my skull molds on mexicansugarskulls.com.

You can pop the amaranth yourself, or you can buy it already popped.

 

 

Things are getting busy around here. Halloween is right around the corner, and so is the Day of the Dead. This has become one of our favorite family traditions, and so every year we make vegan sugar skulls, and pan de muerto for our altar. The skulls are very easy to do, and the kids really enjoy making them (the adults do too!)

Making vegan sugar skulls for the Day of the Dead is one of our favorite family traditions. The kids love it, and the adults too!!!

Last year I perfected the recipe for the vegan version of the sugar skulls, and I couldn’t be happier. Usually, the preparation requires meringue powder or egg whites, but I am using aquafaba with great results. It is definitely more affordable than using meringue powder, and you can make hummus with the chickpeas.

Making vegan sugar skulls for the Day of the Dead is one of our favorite family traditions. The kids love it, and the adults too!!!

This year I have been very conflicted. As you probably already know, el Día de los Muertos is going mainstream. I don’t know how I feel about that. A part of me is excited that more people can get to know Mexican culture, but another part of me wants to scream, ” No, this is cultural appropriation!” I don’t know, what do you think? I guess all I can do, is do my part in helping others understand the beauty of the tradition. Last year I invited some friends over to make the sugar skulls, and then we read the book The Day of the Dead by Bob Barner.

Ok, so let’s get down to business. I recorded a small video for you with the whole process.

The Recipe: Day of the Dead Vegan Sugar Skulls

We don’t usually eat the sugar skulls, but you can if you want to. We use them for decoration. I purchased my molds from mexicansugarskulls.com, way back when nobody else was selling them, but now you can easily find them on Amazon. If you live in a humid climate the sugar skulls will take longer to dry, and you will most likely have to add less aquafaba.

Making vegan sugar skulls for the Day of the Dead is one of our favorite family traditions. The kids love it, and the adults too!!!

Making vegan sugar skulls for the Day of the Dead is one of our favorite family traditions. The kids love it, and the adults too!!!
5 from 2 votes
Print

Day of the Dead Vegan Sugar Skulls

Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword day of the dead, vegan sugar skulls
Total Time 2 days
Servings 5 people
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Skulls:

  • 6 cups Sugar, granulated
  • 4 tbsp. Aquafaba, (liquid from can of chickpeas)

Royal Icing:

  • 3 floz. (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp.) Aquafaba
  • 4-5 cups Powdered Sugar
  • 4 Food coloring of choice

Equipment:

  • 2 Sugar skull molds- front and back
  • 5 Card board squares 4.5 X 4.5 inches
  • 4 Disposable pastry bags
  • Sequins

Preparation

Sugar Skulls

  1. In a large bowl, lightly beat the aquafaba until it starts to bubble.
  2. Pour in the sugar, and use your hand to mix well and incorporate the sugar and the aquafaba. It should have the consistency of wet sand, almost like you are going to build a sand castle.
  3. Make sure your mold is clean and dry. Press the sugar mix into the mold. Use a spoon to scoop out some of the sugar from the back of the skull. This will make the skull less heavy.
  4. Press the cardboard square against the mold and flip the mold, to have the skull facing you. Lift the mold, and carefully place the cardboard with the skull on it on a sheet tray.
  5. Repeat this process with the rest of the sugar. If you want to make a complete sugar skull use both the skull molds.
  6. Leave to dry for at least 24 hours.

Royal Icing

  1. The next day, in a large bowl, lightly beat the aquafaba until it starts to bubble. Add 4 cups of the powdered sugar and mix well. Test the consistency of the icing on a plate. It should be thick enough that it doesn’t slide down the plate easily. If it seems too thin, add 1 more cup of powdered sugar. The consistency should be considerably thicker than the icing used to decorate cookies.

  2. Separate the icing into 4 small bowls. Add your food coloring of choice and mix well.
  3. Pour each bowl of icing into a disposable piping bag. Secure with a rubber band, and cut a tiny bit off of the tip of the bag. Test the amount of icing that comes out before decorating your skull.
  4. Decorate your skull however you desire. I like to use sequins for the eyes. Let dry 24 hours.

Making a complete skull

  1. If you are making complete skulls, leave some of the royal icing white, and use it to glue the front and back of the skull, after it has dried for the initial 24 hours. After you have glued it together, let dry a bit before decorating it.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you live in a humid climate the sugar skulls will take longer to dry, and you will most likely have to add less aquafaba. The longer you let the skulls dry the better. The sugar skulls are not meant to be eaten. They are for decoration. Royal icing recipe adapted from The Blenderist.

How did I not know this book existed until now! Decolonize your Diet by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquivel is part manifesto, part cookbook, and part love story. It is a book that hopes to impulse a movement to help others heal their bodies, reclaim the culture of their ancestors, and revolt against the colonial systems that aim to suppress indigenous traditions.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

It all begins when Luz is diagnosed with breast cancer. This forces her to reexamine not only what she had been feeding her body, but to come up with a plan to survive the cancer. This led to her doing extensive research on breast cancer in Latino communities and what she found began a whole new way of life for both Luz and Catriona.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

In her research it was clear that immigrant Latinos had significantly lower breast cancer rates than those born in the US. Primarily, because immigrants led a diet closer to that of their ancestors, based on beans, corn, squash, wild greens, nopales, fresh fruit, nuts, and seeds. After this discovery, Luz and Catriona began to decolonize their diet.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

The book also touches on how decolonizing your diet fits in perfectly with the Chicana/o movement, in that it aims to preserve our indigenous cooking traditions. This part in particular pulled at my heart strings. I am technically not a chicana myself, because I was born in Mexico, though I have been living in this country for 13 years. My children however are chicanos, and as a mom it feels like every day is a fight against a culture that is not my own. I speak only Spanish to them, I cook Mexican food at home, and we continue traditions that my mother taught me, and her mother taught her. I want them to be proud of their heritage and a big part of that is food. Just like Luz and Catriona say in their book, food is a nexus connecting generations.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

There are over 120 recipes in this book, not all of them are vegan, but most of them include a vegan option. The recipes are wonderfully researched, the cooking techniques explained in detail, and there’s even a section with menu ideas. My favorite ones so far are Verdolagas & Nectarine Summer Salad, Chipotle Pumpkin Soup, and the Tlacoyos con Quelites.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

Thank you, Luz and Catriona, for the inspiring me to continue to publish plant-based recipes that honor Mexican culture and traditions. I hope to meet you guys some day and maybe share a meal that honors our ancestors!

You can purchase Decolonize Your Diet on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Indibound.

The Recipe: Pipian Rojo Over Rice

I have chosen this Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe to share with you, because it is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is a hearty, stick to your ribs kind of sauce, made with roasted pumpkin seeds, roasted tomato, and dried pasilla, arbol, and ancho chiles. The sauce is served over potatoes, green beans, and chayote. You can serve this over a bed of rice with a green salad. Enjoy!

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.
5 from 1 vote
Print

Pipian Rojo Over Rice

Recipe from the book Decolonize Your Diet by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Recipe used with permission from author. 

Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8 Servings

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 2 Corn tortillas
  • 3 Guajillo chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 5 Pasilla chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 1 Chile de Arbol, dried, deseeded
  • 1 White onion, peeled, and quartered
  • 2 Garlic, whole, unpeeled
  • 2 Medium tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup Pumpkin seeds, raw, hulled (pepitas)
  • 8 Allspice berries, whole
  • 6 Peppercorns
  • 1 tsp. Achiote, ground
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. Pepper

Stew

  • 5 Purple potatoes, medium-sized, scrubbed
  • 1/2 lb. Green beans, ends removed
  • 1 Chayote, peeled
  • 1 Onion, diced
  • 3 tbsp. Olive oil (optional)
  • 4 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 2 tbsp. Pumpkin seed oil (optional)
  • 2 cups Cooked rice (white or brown)
  • 1/4 cup Pumpkin seeds, raw, hulled, for garnish
  • 1/4 cup Cilantro, leaves only

Preparation

To make sauce

  1. On a griddle on medium high-heat, toast corn tortillas until crispy and slightly charred. Set aside. On the same griddle, toast dried chiles for 1 minute on each side, taking care not to burn. Put chiles in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Use a small plate to keep chiles submerged for 30 minutes.

  2. On same hot griddle, slightly char onions and garlic, about 4 minutes. Peel garlic and place it with onions in blender. Put whole tomatoes on griddle and turn often to char on several sides, then add to blender. When chiles have finished soaking, drain, and add to blender.

  3. On same hot griddle, toast pumpkin seeds until they begin to puff up. Reserve 1/4 cup of pumpkin seeds for garnish, and add the rest to the blender. On griddle, toast allspice and peppercorns for a few seconds and add to blender wth achiote, salt, and pepper. 

  4. Break charred tortillas into quarters and add to blender. Purée until ingredients form a smooth sauce. If necessary, work in batches or add a small amount of water to blender to process smoothly. Sauce should have the consistency of a tomato sauce or just a little bit chunkier. 

To make stew:

  1. Coarsley chop potatoes, green beans, and chayote into hearty, bite-sized chunks and set aside. In a large pot on medium heat, sauté onions in olive oil for 5 minutes. Add garlic and stir until fragrant. Add potatoes, green beans, and chayote and stir to combine. 

  2. Season vegetables with salt. Add just enough water to cover vegetables and bring to a boil. Stir in pipian sauce. Lower heat to medium simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes or until vegetables are fork-tender. Adjust seasonings.

  3. Divide rice between bowls and serve pipian over rice. Garnish each serving with a drizzle of pumpkin seed oil, pumpkin seeds, and cilantro leaves.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book to complete this review. 

These vegan chiles en nogada will transport you to the city of Puebla in the fall. This dish is one of the stars of Mexican cuisine, because it perfectly embodies why Mexican cuisine was declared Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2010. It is painstakingly laborious, but don’t worry I have adapted it so you can make it at home in less than an hour. A roasted poblano chile is stuffed with a picadillo of pork (lentils in this version), sautéed in onion, garlic, and tomato puree with almonds, apples, olives, plantain, pear, capers, and raisins. It is bathed in a walnut cream sauce and sprinkled with pomegranate seeds.

chiles-en-nogada-02

The earliest versions of this dish can be found in cookbooks as early as 1817, and there are several theories or legends as to where it originated. Some say that the Agustinian Recollects of the Convent of St. Monica  created the dish in honor of the emperor Agustin Iturbide who was in town and had played an important role in the recently won war for Mexican independence. The dish was meant to symbolize the three colors of the Mexican flag green, white, and red.

Another version says that three soldiers of Agustin’s regiment were returning home to Puebla after the war was won, and their girlfriends wanted to prepare a special dish for them. They each found an ingredient that represented the colors of the Mexican flag and said a prayer to our Lady of the Rosary and St. Paschal Baylon, thus chiles en nogada were born.

chiles-en-nogada-01

Regardless of their true origin, chiles en nogada today is a very popular dish only available in the fall, since it uses completely seasonal ingredients found in Puebla. Chiles in nogada season is highly anticipated in Mexico as it is a reflection of our national pride and the celebration of Mexico’s independence which is celebrated on September 16. Mexican cuisine is deeply integrated into the history, culture, and the community identity of the Mexican people, and this dish is only one example of the beauty and richness of it all.

chiles-en-nogada-03

The Recipe: Vegan Chiles en Nogada

You can add peach to the picadillo, but I prefer to leave it out. Traditionally the walnuts are peeled, but this takes insanely long, so instead I have just soaked them the night before. Instead of lentils you could use beefless crumbles, TVP or jackfruit. ¡Enjoy!

Vegan Chiles en Nogada, roasted poblano chile is stuffed with an aromatic picadillo, covered in walnut cream sauce and pomegranate seeds.
5 from 2 votes
Print

Vegan Chiles en Nogada

Vegan Chiles en Nogada, roasted poblano chile is stuffed with an aromatic picadillo, covered in walnut cream sauce and pomegranate seeds.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword chiles en nogada, chiles rellenos, vegan mexican recipes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 4 Servings
446 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups lentils dry
  • ½ Onion, large
  • 2 Garlic cloves, peeled, smashed
  • 2 Large tomatoes, (see note)
  • 4 Poblano peppers, roasted, peeled, seeds removed

Lentil picadillo:

  • ¼ cup Water
  • ½ Onion, minced (1 cup)
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ¼ cup Pear, diced
  • ¼ cup Apple, diced
  • ¾ cup Peeled, diced green plantain
  • ¼ cup Slivered almonds
  • 2 ½ tbsp. Raisins
  • 8 Manzanilla olives, quartered
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped capers
  • 1/4 tsp. Clove, ground
  • 1/8 tsp. Cinnamon, ground
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground black pepper

Sauce:

  • 1 cup Walnuts, soaked in water the night before, drained
  • 1 cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 cup Baguette or bolillo, cut crust off, cut bread into cubes
  • 1 tsp. Sugar or sweetener of choice
  • 1 tsp. White wine
  • Salt to taste

Garnish:

  • 1 Pomegranate, cut, peeled, and seeds removed
  • 1/4 cup Chopped parsley

Preparation

  1. Fill a medium pot with water and add lentils, ½ of an onion, and 2 smashed garlic cloves. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. While the lentils are cooking, place the two tomatoes and the poblano peppers on a sheet tray. Turn your oven broiler to high and place sheet tray on the top rack of the oven. Let them cook for a couple of minutes on each side until the tomato and the chiles begin to soften and have black spots all over. Remove from heat. Place the tomates and chiles in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rest 5 minutes.
  3. Drain the lentils, reserve 1 cup of the lentil cooking liquid, and using a potato masher, mash them to break them up.
  4. Peel the poblano peppers, make 1 cut lengthwise with a knife, and remove the seeds. Set aside.
  5. Remove half of the skin off of the tomatoes, and using a blender process them into a puree. Set aside.
  6. Set a large pot to medium heat, add ¼ cup of water, and add onion. Cook for 4-5 minutes until onion begins to soften and look translucent.
  7. Add garlic and cook for 2 more minutes.
  8. Add cooked lentils, mix well, and pour in tomato puree. Let cook for 3-4 minutes or until the puree begins to bubble and change to a darker red color.
  9. Add clove, cinnamon, black pepper, plantain, apple, pear, almonds, olives, capers, and raisins. Stir mixture.
  10. Add 1 cup of the liquid you reserved from the lentils, and simmer for 20 min or until the plantain is cooke through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  11. While the picadillo is cooking, soak the cut bread in the cup of almond milk for 5 minutes.

  12. In a blender, place the soaked bread and milk, previously soaked and drained walnuts, sugar, and white wine, blend until smooth. Season to taste with salt. It should have the consistency of a cream sauce. If it is too thick, add more almond milk. Set aside.

  13. Stuff the chiles rellenos with the lentil picadillo. Place the chiles seam side down on a plate. Pour walnut sauce over them, and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds and chopped parsley.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

To save time you can buy pre-cooked lentils, and substitute the tomatoes with 1 cup of pureed roasted diced tomatoes (canned). Do not heat up the walnut sauce. Instead of lentils you could use TVP, beefless crumbles or jackfruit.

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Chiles en Nogada
Amount Per Serving (1 chile en nogada)
Calories 446 Calories from Fat 252
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 28g 43%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Sodium 374mg 16%
Potassium 1279mg 37%
Total Carbohydrates 70g 23%
Dietary Fiber 17g 68%
Sugars 24g
Protein 17g 34%
Vitamin A 32.6%
Vitamin C 154.8%
Calcium 19.8%
Iron 30.7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Vegan Chiles en Nogada
Amount Per Serving (1 chile en nogada)
Calories 446 Calories from Fat 252
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 28g 43%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Sodium 374mg 16%
Potassium 1279mg 37%
Total Carbohydrates 70g 23%
Dietary Fiber 17g 68%
Sugars 24g
Protein 17g 34%
Vitamin A 32.6%
Vitamin C 154.8%
Calcium 19.8%
Iron 30.7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

I have fallen in love with sweet potatoes. I actually used to dislike them, but during my pregnancy I craved them and now I can’t get enough of them. These sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are one of the many ways you can use sweet potatoes. The shredded carrots and sweet potatoes are stewed with onion, garlic, and a tomato-chipotle sauce. The sweet potatoes make this dish just a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess that will keep you coming back for more, and the avocado gives it a luscious creaminess. Serve on warm tortillas for tacos or on tostadas smothered with beans.

Sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess and spiciness that will keep you coming back.

Traditionally, tinga is a shredded pork dish that originates from Puebla. It is also commonly made with chicken or beef. For another vegan option you could use jackfruit or hearts of palm. The best thing about this recipe though is that it’s super easy to make and only requires a couple of ingredients. I make a less spicy version for my kids and they love it!

Sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess and spiciness that will keep you coming back.

Our baby is now 2 months old, and I’m trying to get back into the rythm of things, testing recipes, posting, and recording videos. I am planning on finally launching a youtube channel in the next couple of weeks, but I have to say it makes me really nervous. If you have any suggestions, words of encouragement, or recipe requests I am all ears. Enjoy!!

Sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess and spiciness that will keep you coming back.

The Recipe: Sweet Potato and Carrot Tinga Tacos

Make sure to cook the tinga until the sweet potatoes and carrots are tender. The texture should not be crunchy. Enjoy!

Sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess and spiciness that will keep you coming back.
4.5 from 4 votes
Print

Sweet Potato and Carrot Tinga Tacos

Sweet potato and carrot tinga tacos are a bit sweet, the chipotle-tomato sauce adds a tanginess and spiciness that will keep you coming back.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword carrot tinga, vegan mexican recipes, vegan tacos
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 Servings
304 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Water
  • 1 cup Thinly sliced white onion
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 1/2 cups Grated sweet potato
  • 1 cup Grated carrot
  • 1 can (14 oz.) Diced tomatoes
  • 1 tsp. Mexican oregano (optional)
  • 2 Chipotle peppers in adobo
  • 1/2 cup Vegetable stock
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • 8 Tortillas corn or flour

Preparation

  1. In a large sauté pan over medium-heat, add water and onion, cook for 3 -4 minutes, until the onion is translucent and soft. Add the garlic and continue to cook, stirring for 1 minute.

  2. Add sweet potato and carrot to the pan and cook for 5 min stirring often.

Sauce:

  1. Place the diced tomatoes, vegetable stock, oregano, and chipotle peppers in the blender and process until smooth.

  2. Add chipotle-tomato sauce to the pan and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sweet potatoes and carrot are cooked through. If necessary add more vegetable stock to the pan. 

  3. Serve on warm tortillas and top with avocado slices.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

Increase or decrease spiciness by adding or removing some of the chipotle peppers. You can also serve on tostadas smothered with refried beans. 

Nutrition Facts
Sweet Potato and Carrot Tinga Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 304 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 9g 14%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 340mg 14%
Potassium 820mg 23%
Total Carbohydrates 53g 18%
Dietary Fiber 11g 44%
Sugars 7g
Protein 6g 12%
Vitamin A 348.5%
Vitamin C 16.1%
Calcium 11.7%
Iron 12.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Sweet Potato and Carrot Tinga Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 304 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 9g 14%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 340mg 14%
Potassium 820mg 23%
Total Carbohydrates 53g 18%
Dietary Fiber 11g 44%
Sugars 7g
Protein 6g 12%
Vitamin A 348.5%
Vitamin C 16.1%
Calcium 11.7%
Iron 12.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.