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These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed to perfection. What makes these so good is that the masa is spiced with guajillo chiles, coconut oil, and cumin. They are so delicious and 100% vegan and gluten-free.

Jackfruit simmering in red chile sauce in a cast iron pan

These are the first tamales I ever learned how to make. Back when I didn’t know how to make tamales, my dad invited me to the family restaurant to learn. Over the years we had helped on several occasions with the spreading of the masa on the husk and the folding, but I had never done the whole process from start to finish. Tamales rojos are very typical of the northern Mexico, they are usually filled with pork and are very small in size, but with a pretty equal ratio of masa to filling.

Masa for tamales in a silver bowl

The thing about learning how to cook in a restaurant is that you learn how to make huge quantities of food. That day we must’ve made more than 200 tamales! Believe me, it was a few years before I decided to make tamales again all by myself. When I became vegan, I was very sad at the thought of not having good tamales again, and frankly the thought of tamales filled with veggies didn’t appeal to me at the moment.

Tamales wrapped in corn husk on a blue back ground

However, after some experimentation with jackfruit, I decided to veganize this recipe from the family restaurant. The result was shockingly similar to the original ones. So much so, that my omnivore husband was tricked into thinking that the tamales weren’t vegan!!

Tamales arranged in a steamer pot

This recipe is part of my ebook Vegan Tamales Unwrapped. After making these red chile jackfruit tamales I became so obsessed with making vegan tamales that I decided to make my obsession into an ebook. It has 50 detailed pictures on how to make vegan tamales from making the masa to spreading and wrapping.

vegan tamales ebook

Every possible aspect of tamal making is explored, the type of fats, wrappers, fillings, cooking methods. There’s even an option for oil free tamales. It includes both savory and sweet tamal recipes such as:

  • Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales
  • Mole Tamales
  • Salsa Verde Jackfruit Tamales
  • Chocolate Tamales
  • Strawberry Tamales
  • Lime Tamales

It is available for purchase on Amazon for $6.99. Sadly it is only available in ebook format, but if you don’t have a kindle you can also purchase it on itunes to read on your mac devices. I am so proud of this book and I know you will enjoy it too!

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel

The Recipe: Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

  • Masa harina is dried nixtamalized corn flour. It is used in Mexico to make tortillas, tamales, sopes, etc. The brand most commonly found is Maseca, but the only non-gmo organic one I’ve found is Bob’s Red Mill
  • I found coconut oil to be the most flavorful fat to use in this recipe. I recommend you use refined coconut oil so the coconut flavor doesn’t affect the tamales. If you use unrefined coconut oil you will get a coconutty flavor.
  • If you have a hard time finding jackfruit, (I find mine at Trader Joe’s) you can use mushrooms instead.
  • If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel
5 from 6 votes
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Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed until tender.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword vegan mexican recipes, vegan tamales
Total Time 2 hours
Servings 18 - 24 Tamales
91 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Guajillo Chile Sauce

  • 20 (4 oz._ Guajillo chiles, dry, seeded
  • 3-4 Arbol chiles, dried, seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • 1/2 White onion, chopped
  • 2 cups Chile soaking liquid

Filling

  • 4 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans (20 oz.) Green jackfruit in brine
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce

Dough

  • 1 cup (8 oz.) Refined coconut oil, room temperature
  • 4 cups (1 lb. 2 oz.) Masa harina
  • 1 ½ tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Cumin, ground
  • 3 ½ cups Vegetable broth or stock
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce
  • 30 Corn husks

Preparation

To prepare the corn husks

  1. Soak the corn husks in hot water, in a large pot or in your kitchen sink. Place a plate over them to weigh them down so they are completely submerged. Let them soak for at least an hour.

To make the sauce

  1. Place the chiles in a small sauce pot and cover with water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and let cook for about 10 minutes. Drain the chiles and reserve 2 cups of the soaking liquid. Place the chiles, garlic, onion, and soaking liquid in the blender and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and strain. You should end up with about 3 cups of sauce.

To make the filling

  1. Drain the jackfruit. Rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add minced garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring often. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes or until it begins to brown. Pour 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile sauce and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 20 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper and let cool.

To make the dough

  1. Beat the coconut oil, on medium-high speed, with an electric mixer for 1 minute. Add the baking powder, cumin, salt, and beat for 1 minute to incorporate into the coconut oil.

  2. Add half of the masa harina to the bowl, pour in half of the vegetable stock, and beat to incorporate. After it is completely incorporated, add the other half of masa harina, vegetable stock, and 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile puree. Beat at low speed, until thoroughly mixed. It should have the consistency of a thick cake batter. If necessary, add more vegetable stock until you reach that consistency. Taste the dough, and add more salt if necessary. It should be a little bit salty.
  3. For lighter and fluffier tamales, let the dough rest for an hour in the refrigerator. Remove the dough from the fridge and rebeat it, adding enough liquid to get it to the consistency it had before.
  4. Remove the corn husks from the water and set on paper towels. Reserve the largest husks to wrap the tamales and the small ones to line the steamer.

To set up your steamer

  1. Fill the bottom with water making sure the water is not touching the steamer rack. Line the rack and sides of the steamer pot with corn husks. Set aside.

To wrap the tamales

  1. Pull 24 pencil thin strips off of the corn husks and set aside. Take a husk and dry off the excess water with a paper towel. Place the husk in your hand with the tapered side away from you and the smooth side up. Using a spoon, spread 2-3 tbsp. of the dough (¼ inch thick) onto the corn husk, forming a 3 - 4 inch square. Leave a border of at least 3/4 inch on each side of the square.

  2. Place 1 ½ tbsp. of the filling in the center of the dough. Bring the two long sides of the corn husk together, this will cause the masa to surround the filling, and roll them in the same direction around the tamal. (If the husk is too small, fold one of the long sides towards the center, and then fold the other long side on top.) Fold down the empty tapered section of the corn husk, forming a closed bottom. This will leave the top of the tamal open. Tie with a corn husk strip to secure the bottom of the tamal.

  3.  Place the tamal in the steamer vertically leaning against the side of the pot, with the open end on top. Repeat this process until you run out of dough and all the tamales are in the steamer. Cover them with a layer of corn husks. If the steamer is not full, fill the empty spaces with more corn husks. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and cook for 40 minutes. Check the tamales, when they separate easily from the corn husk it means they are done. If they are not done, steam for 10 more minutes and check again.

  4. Remove steamer from the heat and let sit covered for 10 minutes. Uncover and let cool for at least an hour. Don’t be alarmed if the tamales seem really soft. As they cool, they will firm up.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Nutrition Facts
Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales
Amount Per Serving
Calories 91 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Sodium 498mg22%
Potassium 94mg3%
Carbohydrates 17g6%
Fiber 2g8%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 320IU6%
Vitamin C 0.9mg1%
Calcium 58mg6%
Iron 2mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.


If you’ve never tried vegan pozole verde you’re in for a treat. Wild mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with creamy avocado, crisp lettuce and fresh radishes.

mushrooms cooking in a pot for vegan pozole verde

Pozole is a dish of pre-hispanic origins, the name pozole comes from the Nahuatl word “pozolli” which means ‘frothy’. Which refers to the appearance of the white corn as it’s boiled. It was a dish reserved for special celebrations and religious ceremonies. Legend has it that it was made with human flesh, as an offering to the gods for a fruitful harvest. (Gross!)

pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, cilantro and poblano in blender for vegan pozole verde

Nowadays, there are actually 3 most common types of pozole: rojo, blanco and verde. Red pozole is seasoned with a mixture of dried chiles, white pozole is seasoned with herbs, and green pozole usually contains pumpkins seeds, tomatillos, and green chiles.

Smooth green sauce in blender for vegan pozole verde

The recipe varies according to the state that you’re in. For pozole verde you can find a version from Jalisco, one from Guerrero, and one from Guanajuato.  They are all very similar with small variations like adding poblano peppers, or the toppings change from state to state.

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

I loved the addition of pumpkin seeds to this vegan pozole verde, because it adds a touch of creaminess to the broth without using oil or cream. You can make this pozole anytime, but it would be a great addition to your Christmas or Thanksgiving menus.

I’m not going to lie, I enjoyed this so much I ate the whole batch myself in a couple of days! I hope you like it too.

The Recipe: Vegan Pozole Verde

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of Serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.
  • Enjoy

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl
4.5 from 18 votes
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Vegan Pozole Verde

Vegan pozole verde, mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with avocado, lettuce and radishes.

Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword pozole verde, vegan pozole
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 4 servings
375 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 1 ½ lb. Maitake or oyster mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup Diced onion
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ cup Raw pumpkin seeds, pepitas
  • 2 Poblano peppers
  • 3-4 Serrano peppers
  • 4 Tomatillos, medium
  • 1/2 cup Chopped cilantro
  • 1 cup Leafy greens, spinach, radish greens, swiss chard
  • 1 sprig Epazote
  • ¼ tsp. Cumin, ground
  • ¼ tsp. Mexican oregano, dried
  • 2 qts. Vegetable stock
  • 1 can (29oz) White hominy 29 oz, drained, and rinsed

Garnishes:

  • 1 Avocado, pitted and diced
  • 4 Red radishes, sliced
  • ½ Head Romaine or iceberg lettuce, finely shredded (julienned)
  • 4 Tostadas

Preparation

  1. In a large pot set to medium heat sauté the mushrooms in 1 tbsp. of oil until golden brown about 6-8 min.
  2. While the mushrooms are cooking, toast the pumpkin seeds lightly in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Remove from pan and set aside.
  3. Remove the mushrooms from the pot, and add the onions. Turn heat down to medium-low and sweat onions until tender and transparent about 4-5 minutes.
  4. Add garlic and cook for two more minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot. Pour in the vegetable stock and hominy and simmer softly until you are ready to add the sauce.
  5. Turn oven broiler on to HI setting.
  6. Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, and tomatillos on a sheet tray lined with foil. Place under the broiler for 3 minutes or until the peppers have begun to get dark spots. Flip the peppers and tomatillos over and let cook for 3 more minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  7. Place the poblano peppers in bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit 5 minutes.
  8. Peel poblano peppers and remove the stems and seeds.
  9. Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, greens, epazote, cilantro, cumin, and oregano in a blender and process until smooth.
  10. 10. Strain the sauce into a medium sauce pot set to medium-low heat. Let sauce simmer for 5-6 minutes or until it changes to a darker green color.
  11. 11. Pour sauce into the pot with the mushrooms and hominy and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 8-10 minutes, and season with salt and pepper.
  12. 12. Serve with garnishes.

Chef's Notes

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.
Nutrition Facts
Vegan Pozole Verde
Amount Per Serving
Calories 375 Calories from Fat 171
% Daily Value*
Fat 19g29%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 2053mg89%
Potassium 1460mg42%
Carbohydrates 44g15%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 11g12%
Protein 14g28%
Vitamin A 2605IU52%
Vitamin C 66.7mg81%
Calcium 70mg7%
Iron 5.1mg28%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

These crispy, creamy, yet tender vegan fish tacos will conquer any tofu skeptic. The tofu is marinated in lime juice and spices, then coated in a light batter and fried. They are served on warm tortillas topped with pico de gallo, creamy mayo sauce, cucumber, cabbage, and a splash of lime juice.

Batter for vegan fish tacos

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of  the Mexican union. With this project I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S. and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet.

tofu marinating for vegan fish tacos

This recipe is by Alex Cardenas from @chocolateandavocadoes and is representing Baja California Norte. Baja California is know for it’s beautiful beaches, vineyards, picturesque beach towns, and whale migrations. The most popular destinations are Rosarito, Ensenada, Tijuana, and the Valle de Guadalupe (Mexico’s wine country).

Pico de gallo in a red bowl for vegan fish tacos

[I used to think fish tacos were a gringo invention like fried ice cream, that got attributed to Mexico, but before going vegan I had the chance to visit Baja California and try fish tacos, which as it turns out are 100% Mexican, but were popularized in the U.S. by a California fast food chain Rubio’s.]

Tofu lined with nori sheets for vegan fish tacos

Alex’s Vegan Journey

Hi my name is Alejandra Cardenas and I was born and raised in Mexico in Ensenada, Baja California Norte. I currently live live in Los Angeles, CA, and have been here since 2009. I majored in psychology and worked for several years, and now I dedicate my time to raising my small son. I initially became vegetarian in 2010 after watching the documentary Food, Inc.
Fried tofu fish for vegan fish tacos
The images of the animals in large factory farms and food corporations, and how they allow the animals to live in the most inhospitable conditions was enough to motivate me to stop participating in that cycle of cruelty. However, it wasn’t until 2014 after watching more documentaries and reading some health books that I decided to take my diet and lifestyle to another level and become vegan. The change impacted my health quickly, my energy increased, I no longer felt a heavy feeling after eating, like I did when eating animal products, and my skin became clear after many years of skin problems.
Vegan fish tacos in a cast iron pan with limes, tomato, and avocado
A vegan diet also changed the way I cooked completely. I discovered that vegan cooking is not only about substituting protein, but about opening the door to an infinity of ingredients, vegetables and spices that I had never used before, and that maybe I would’ve never used if I had kept eating an animal based diet.
Thanks to veganism I discovered my love for cooking, and gained the peace of mind that my son will grow strong and healthy. I hope that through our example he will always have a positive perspective towards food, will know where this food comes from without having to hurt another living being, and have compassion towards all sentient beings.
Vegan fish tacos in a cast iron pan with limes, tomato, and avocado

The Recipe: Vegan Fish Tacos Baja Style

  • Use cut up nori sheets or dulce seaweed powder to give the tofu a fishy flavor
  • The recipe calls for Persian cucumber, but any cucumber will do.
  • Serve these immediately after frying them or they can become soggy.
  • If tofu isn’t your thing, you can use cauliflower instead.

Vegan Fish Taco Sauce

Traditionally the sauce is a mixture of mayo and crema, but for this version we are using vegan mayo and cashew or almond crema. If you like you can also add chipotle to this.

Vegan fish tacos in a cast iron pan with limes, tomato, and avocado

Vegan fish tacos in a cast iron pan with limes, tomato, and avocado
4.5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Fish Tacos - Baja Style

These crispy, creamy, yet tender vegan fish tacos will conquer any tofu skeptic. The tofu is fried in batter then served on warm tortillas.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. Extra firm or high protein tofu
  • 2-3 Nori sheets

Tofu marinade:

  • 3 tbsp. Lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. Neutral oil - I used grape seed (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp. Mexican oregano
  • 1/4 tsp. Kelp/dulse granules or crumbled / powdered nori
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Batter:

  • 1 cup Organic all purpose flour or all purpose gf flour
  • 2 Tbsp. Arrowroot powder or cornstarch
  • 1 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 cup Sparkling water or beer
  • Pinch Mustard powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Granulated garlic
  • 1/4 tsp. Mexican oregano
  • 1/4 tsp. Turmeric powder for color ( optional)
  • 1/4 tsp. Smoked paprika (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt or to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Neutral Oil for frying, like refined coconut or sunflower seed oil

Pico de gallo:

  • 1 Medium/large tomato, chopped
  • 1 Medium red onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Cilantro, chopped
  • 1 Scallion or green onion, chopped
  • 1 Serrano or jalapeño pepper, finely minced(optional)
  • Juice of half a lemon

Mayo sauce:

  • 3 tbsp. Vegan mayo
  • 3 tbsp. Cashew or almond crema or vegan sour cream or more vegan mayo
  • Lemon juice as needed to thin out the sauce

Garnishes:

  • 6-8 Corn Tortillas or your favorite tortilla
  • Lemons or limes
  • 1 cup Chopped Peeld Persian cucumber
  • 1/2 Green cabbage finely diced
  • Hot sauce optional

Preparation

Batter

  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl and make a well in the center. Pour the sparkling water or beer and slowly mix with a ballon whisk or egg beater until everything is incorporated without overmixing. 
  2. Cover and store in the refrigerator for 15 minutes to an hour.

Tofu Phish

  1. Mix all the marinade ingredients in a shallow container or baking dish and set aside.

  2. Press the tofu for about 20 minutes to remove the excess water, then cut lengthwise into 1/2 inch slabs or fillets. 
  3. Place in the dish and marinade for at least 20 minutes. Flip them half way to make sure all sides are coated and the tofu soaks up all the flavor.  
  4. While the tofu marinates, prepare the pico de gallo and mayo sauce. 

Pico de Gallo

  1. In a small bowl combine all the pico de gallo ingredients then add the lemon and salt and pepper. 
  2. Taste and add more seasonings or lemon if desired. If you like your pico de gallo spicy, add a finely chopped serrano or jalapeño chile. 

Mayo Sauce

  1. Mix the both the mayo and the cashew crema with a wire whisk or fork until all is incorporated. Add lemon juice to taste and until desired consistency.

  2. Season with salt. Store both the pico de gallo and sauce in the refrigerator until ready to use.

Assembly

  1. To recreate the taste of the sea, measure and cut the nori sheets to cover one side of the tofu fillets, placing the rough side of the nori on top of the tofu (shiny side up). 
  2. Using your fingers, gently apply some of the marinade to help it stick to the tofu or squeeze some more lemon juice on top.
  3. Using a heavy bottom saucepan or deep fryer, bring the oil to medium heat. The oil is ready when you add a drop of batter to the oil and sizzles. 
  4. Prepare your cooking stations before beginning to help you stay organized: dish with marinated tofu, batter bowl, saucepan and a large plate lined with paper towels.  
  5. Using a fork and spoon, place the tofu in the batter and gently spoon the batter on top, this will ensure that the nori sheet stays on the tofu, you will need to do this in several batches.  
  6. Drop the fillets in the oil giving enough space between them, about 2 to 3 since you don’t want to overcrowd the pan. 
  7. Cook tofu fillets for 3-5 minutes or until the edges are browned. Remove from the oil and place on your plate with paper towels to cool down. Continue with the rest of the tofu until done.
  8. Serve on warmed tortillas, with the pico de gallo, mayo sauce, chopped cucumber, cabbage, and extra lemon.

Chef's Notes

  • Use cut up nori sheets or dulce seaweed powder to give the tofu a fishy flavor.
  • The recipe calls for Persian cucumber, but any cucumber will do.
  • Serve these immediately after frying them or they can become soggy. 
  • If tofu isn't your thing you can use cauliflower instead.

 

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I am so excited to share with amazing book with you. Vegan Yack Attack on the Go, is the first vegan cookbook that I’ve browsed through and immediately though,”I want to make all these recipes!” This recipe for roasted butternut squash and mushroom tacos is one of my favorites from the book. The author is Jackie Sobon from the vegan blog Vegan Yack Attack.

Butternut squash, mushrooms, black beans and tomatillos on a sheetpan.

The best part is that it is a quick recipe that requires only a sheet pan. All you have to do is chop, toss, and roast and the next thing you know dinner is on the table. I love the combination of butternut squash and black beans, and when you add mushrooms and spices it all comes together perfectly.

vegan yack attack on the go cookbook

Even though it is not a traditional Mexican recipe I wanted to share it with you, because it’s delicious and easy to make. I served mine on warm corn tortillas, but you can definitely make a burrito out of it, or it would make a good filling for enchiladas.

roasted butternut squash, black beans, and mushrooms

So why I am I so excited about this book?? Honestly a lot of vegan cookbooks have the same recipes with a little bit of variation, not this one. There are a few classics like smoothies, burritos, and pasta, but there are so many other great recipes like the creamy berry polenta, asparagus omelette, coconut BLT, and the vanilla chip buckwheat bars.

butternut squash and mushroom tacos on a plate

My favorite part of the book is that the recipes are quick to make, which is absolutely a must when you have 3 kids and work from home. There’s even a section for camping or cookout foods that is just genius, like the campfire banana split. I highly recommend this book. What are you waiting for??? Go check it out .

butternut squash and mushroom tacos with salsa verde, jalapeño and lime

The Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos

  • You can use baby bella or portabello mushrooms.
  • This recipe would also work with acorn or hubbard squash
  • I love the black beans in this, but pinto beans would work also.
  • Use chile ancho powder instead of a regular chili powder for a deeper smoky flavor
  • Enjoy!!
butternut squash and mushroom tacos, jalapeño and lime
5 from 2 votes
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Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos

Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos, an easy and delicious weeknight dinner everyone will love!

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword black beans, butternut squash and mushroom tacos, vegan tacos
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Diced and peeled, butternut squash
  • 2 cups Chopped baby bella mushrooms
  • 1 can (15 oz.) Black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup Chopped yellow onion
  • 1 tbsp. Sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp. Chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt, or more to taste
  • 1/4 tsp. Paprika
  • Pinch Cayenne Pepper
  • 2 cups Chopped tomatillos, with husks removed
  • 8 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Shredded cabbage
  • 1 Jalapeño, thinly sliced
  • 8 Small lime wedges

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6), and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  2. Place the butternut squash, mushrooms, black beans, and yellow onions in a mixing bowl. Drizzle with oil and toss to coat, then add the chili powder, cumin, salt, oregano, paprika, and cayenne pepper, and toss again. Spread the mixture out on the baking sheet, leaving some space for the tomatillos.
  3. Place the tomatillos on the remainder of the baking sheet, then place in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the squash is fork tender. Sprinkle with more salt to taste, if desired.
  4. Warm the tortillas in either the microwave or on a hot pan until soft and pliable. Fill each one with some butternut– black bean mixture, then top with tomatillos, shredded cabbage, and jalapeño slices. Serve warm, accompanied by lime wedges.

Chef's Notes

  • You can use baby bella or portabello mushrooms.
  • This recipe would also work with acorn or hubbard squash
  • I love the black beans in this, but pinto beans would work also.
  • Use chile ancho powder instead of a regular chili powder for a deeper smoky flavor
Nutrition Facts
Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 338 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Sodium 702mg31%
Potassium 1123mg32%
Carbohydrates 62g21%
Fiber 15g63%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 13g26%
Vitamin A 8090IU162%
Vitamin C 37mg45%
Calcium 106mg11%
Iron 2.6mg14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Tacos
Amount Per Serving (2 tacos)
Calories 338 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Sodium 702mg31%
Potassium 1123mg32%
Carbohydrates 62g21%
Fiber 15g63%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 13g26%
Vitamin A 8090IU162%
Vitamin C 37mg45%
Calcium 106mg11%
Iron 2.6mg14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema. They are crazy easy to make, and are so good you’ll be making them again and again.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

In Mexico these are known simply as encacahuatadas, and are a classic home cooked dish. They are usually filled with chicken, but your favorite vegetable filling will go great with these. They would make a great dinner, or even a good brunch option.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Let me just say that I am obsessed with this sauce. I have been putting it on everything! So far it is perfect with the enchiladas, but you can also put it on your baked potatoes, polenta, pasta, tacos, buddha bowls, and tofu. I’m one of those people that falls in love with a sauce or dish and then I makes it over and over again until I get tired it. This is one of those sauces. So you definitely have to try it.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Summer is coming up and I am so not ready to have all the kids home. Not ready!! The first couple of weeks are always a little rough, but once we get into a groove we really have fun. My two older ones are always arguing and bothering each other, which can get really stressful sometimes, but our sweet baby is always all smiles. What are some of your summer plans?? I’ll tell you what I am ready for, all the delicious summer fruit. 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

The Recipe: Spicy Peanut Sauce Enchiladas

  • Your favorite veggie filling will be perfect with these
  • If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds.
  • Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.
  • You can use cashew or almond crema
  • Do not place these in the oven because they will fall apart.

 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
4.8 from 5 votes
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Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword peanut enchiladas, spicy peanut sauce, vegan enchiladas
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
387 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 8 Guajillo Chiles stems and seeds removed, rinsed
  • 1-2 Chipotle pepper in adobo
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • 1 cup Peanuts, toasted
  • 1 Plum tomato, roasted
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground clove
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Filling

  • 1 lb. Mushrooms. cremini sliced
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 oz. Spinach or other leafy green, roughly chopped
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Almond crema

Preparation

To make the peanut sauce:

  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Drop in the guajillo chiles and turn heat down to a simmer, let simmer for 10 min.
  2. Drain guajillo chiles and place in blender with peanuts, chipotle chiles, garlic, roasted tomato, clove, and vegetable stock. Blend until smooth. If necessary add more stock until you reach the desired consistency.If you do not have a high powered blender, strain the sauce. Set aside.

To make the filling:

  1. Add ¼ cup of water or vegetable stock to a large sauté pan set to medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until almost all the moisture has evaporated from the mushrooms and they are beginning to brown. Add more liquid if necessary.
  2. Lower heat to medium-low and add the garlic, cook for 1 min. Add the spinach and stir. Cover pan and let spinach cook down, 2 -3 minutes. Add hominy and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

To assemble

  1. Bring a medium sauce pot to low-medium heat and pour in sauce. Heat just enough to get it hot. If it simmers, the sauce might break.
  2. Warm corn tortillas in the microwave for 30 seconds or in the oven at 350F on a sheet tray for 5 min. Just enough so that the tortillas are soft enough to be rolled.
  3. Spread 2-3 tbsp. of the peanut sauce on the bottom of a 9 x13 baking dish, Place 1 tbsp. of filling on each tortilla. Roll and place on baking dish. Continue this process until you have used up all the tortillas and the entire filling.
  4. Pour the rest of the peanut sauce on top of the enchiladas and drizzle almond crema on top.

Chef's Notes

If the sauce and the filling are hot there is no need to put the enchiladas in the oven. If you would rather place them in the oven do so at 350°F for 5-7 minutes. If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds. Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.

Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Fat 10g15%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 648mg28%
Potassium 1392mg40%
Carbohydrates 57g19%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 18g36%
Vitamin A 7490IU150%
Vitamin C 21.8mg26%
Calcium 170mg17%
Iron 4.3mg24%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Fat 10g15%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 648mg28%
Potassium 1392mg40%
Carbohydrates 57g19%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 18g36%
Vitamin A 7490IU150%
Vitamin C 21.8mg26%
Calcium 170mg17%
Iron 4.3mg24%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

What doesn’t go well with mole?? I don’t know, but I’m willing to test every possible combination to find out. Either way, you can’t go wrong with enmoladas (also known as mole enchiladas), filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds.

Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!
Once again I have partnered with Hernán mole to make this recipe super easy, and convenient. I have a confession to make: I probably have only made mole 3 times in my life! Making mole isn’t hard, but it is terribly time consuming, and requires over 15 different ingredients! That’s why I love using Hernan mole. In less than thirty minutes I can have dinner on the table.

Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!

It’s harder than you think to find a mole paste that is completely vegan and free of additives or preservatives. If you do find yourself in Mexico ask before eating mole, since it is often made with lard and chicken stock. Mole enchiladas is one of my go to dinners. I have filled these with braised greens and potatoes, but you can also fill them with zucchini and black beans, roasted poblano pepper and corn, or mushrooms and greens.

Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!
If you want to give Hernan Mole a try be sure to visit their site.

Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!
The Recipe: Mole Enchiladas with Braised Greens and Potatoes

  • Use corn tortillas. Flour tortillas become very gummy when soaked in sauce.
  • You can use any leafy greens you prefer such as spinach, kale and swiss chard.
  • Make sure not to over cook the potatoes or you’ll end up with mashed potatoes and greens.
  • You can also top this with almond crema.
  • Enjoy!!
Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!
5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Mole Enchiladas with Braised Greens and Potatoes

Mole enchiladas (enmoladas) filled with braised greens and potatoes, and topped with avocado slices, vegan cotija, and toasted sesame seeds. Super easy and delicious!
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Total Time 30 minutes
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Russet potatoes, medium, peeled, diced (about 2 ½ cups)
  • 1 cup Diced onion
  • 2 cloves Garlic minced
  • 4 cups Spinach or Swiss chard
  • 1 jar Hernan Mole Poblano
  • 2 - 3 cups Vegetable stock
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • ¼ cup Toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 Avocado, sliced

Preparation

  1. Fill a medium pot with cold water and add potatoes. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, and let cook for about 6 minutes or until the potatoes are tender, but not mushy. Drain the potatoes and set aside.
  2. While the potatoes are cooking, heat a large sauté pan to medium-low heat and add the onion. Cook the onion for 3-4 minutes or until it is tender and translucent. If the onion begins to stick, add some water or vegetable stock to the pan.
  3. Add the garlic and let cook for 2 more minutes. Add greens, and if necessary add more vegetable stock. Mix well.
  4. Once the greens are cooked, add the potatoes, season with salt and pepper and stir. Set aside.
  5. In a medium sauce pot bring one cup of vegetable stock to simmer over medium heat. Add in mole paste and stir with a wooden spoon until the mole paste is dissolved, about 3 – 4 minutes.
  6. Pour in 1 more cup vegetable stock and stir. Once the mole reaches the desired consistency remove from heat. Add as much vegetable stock as necessary.
  7. Wrap the tortillas in a moist paper towel and place in the microwave for 30 seconds. Repeat until the tortillas are warm and flexible.
  8. Take 1 ½ tbsp. of the filling and place it on a tortilla. Fold the tortilla in half over the filling. Repeat until you have filled all the tortillas. (Work fast or everything will get cold!)
  9. Using a large serving spoon, pour mole on each plate and spread to cover the width of the plate. Place 3 filled tortillas on top of the sauce on each plate, then cover with more sauce.
  10. 10. Top with avocado slices, toasted sesame seeds, and vegan cotija. Serve immediately.

Chef's Notes

Use corn tortillas. Flour tortillas become very gummy when soaked in sauce. You can use any leafy greens you prefer such as spinach, kale and swiss chard. Make sure not to overcook the potatoes or you'll end up with mashed potatoes and greens. You can also top this with almond crema.

 

Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

Mole and chilaquiles?? If you haven’t heard of this before you are seriously missing out. Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

I’m really excited to tell you about this mole I discovered completely by chance. Back in October my family and I went to the Day of the Dead festival in San Antonio and there was a stand selling mole paste. I tried it and fell in love instantly when I discovered that Hernán Mole is vegan, from Mexico, and has no preservatives. I spoke to the founder, Isela, and it turns out she’s from my hometown Acuña/Del Rio. Can you believe it?? In fact, the headquarters of Hernán are located in Del Rio!!

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

I knew that you would be as interested in Hernán Mole as I was, so I asked Isela if I could share it with you. There are two versions available Mole Poblano and Mole Pipian (which is a pumpkin seed mole). The mole is made in Mexico by local artisans and producers, many of whom have never ventured beyond their local markets and cities.

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

I don’t know if you have noticed that I don’t do a lot of sponsored posts, and that’s mostly because I have a hard time finding products that I truly believe in, and that will fit into this whole vegan Mexican thing I have going on. Well, Hernán is a business that promotes Mexican cuisine and culture and opens up new opportunities to Mexican artisans, and that is something I can really get behind and I know that you will too.

You can purchase Hernán Mole Poblano here.

Let me know if you love it as much as I do!!

The Recipe: Vegan Mole Chilaquiles with Greens and Beans

  • If you’re trying be healthy you can bake corn tortillas to make this, if you’re ok with the occasional or not so occasional fried food fry the tortillas or buy a bag of homestyle tortilla chips.
  • You can omit the almond crema and vegan queso cotija, and just top the chilaquiles with avocado. I made the crema and queso the day before.
  • You can also add zucchini and broccoli to the greens and beans for extra nutrition.
  • When you serve this dish the chips shouldn’t be completely soggy, there should be some crunch, so serve immediately after mixing the chips with the mole.

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.

 

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.
5 from 3 votes
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Vegan Mole Chilaquiles with Greens and Beans

Vegan mole chilaquiles are tortilla chips covered in mole sauce and mixed with sautéed greens and black beans, then drizzled with an almond crema, and vegan queso cotija. The combination is seriously good.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 24 corn tortillas, cut into triangles (12ths) or (1 bag of corn chips)

Greens and Beans:

  • ¼ cup Water
  • 2 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 oz Spinach, (about 1 bag)
  • 1 can (14 oz.) Black beans, drained

Sauce:

Toppings

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Place tortilla triangle on two baking sheets lined with parchment and bake for 15 to 20 minutes until crispy. Remove from oven and set aside. (You can also fry them in a heavy bottomed sauté pan until golden brown, or buy a bag of chips.)

Greens and Beans:

  1. Heat a large sauté pan to medium heat and pour in ¼ cup of water. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add spinach and mix.
  2. Once spinach has cooked down (about 2 minutes) add black beans. Season with salt and pepper.

Sauce:

  1. Set a large pot to medium heat, add 1 cup of vegetable stock and mole paste. Stir.
  2. Once the mole paste dissolves, and the mixture starts simmering, add the second cup of vegetable stock. It will seem like the mole is too thin, but as soon as the mole cools down even a little bit it thickens. Bring to a simmer, stir, and remove from heat.

Bringing it all Together

  1. Make sure your mole is the right consistency, it should be the consistency of a thin cream soup, adjust as necessary with vegetable stock.
  2. Add chips, and the greens and beans into the pot with the mole. Mix well to coat. Serve immediately and top with almond crema, vegan queso Cotija, and onion.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you’re trying be healthy you can bake corn tortillas to make this, if you’re ok with the occasional or not so occasional fried food fry the tortillas or buy a bag of homestyle tortilla chips. You can omit the almond crema and vegan queso cotija, and just top the chilaquiles with avocado. I made the crema and queso the day before. You can also add zucchini and broccoli to the greens and beans for extra nutrition.

I didn’t think it was possible, but it is!! You CAN make a vegan caldo de res. Caldo de res or vegan Mexican beef soup is a warm comforting soup of stewed beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.

vegan Caldo de res or vegan Mexican beef soup is a warm comforting soup of stewed beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.

This vegan version is pretty close to the original, but instead of using beef we are using the Gardein beefless tips (this is not a sponsored post). The beefless tips infuse the vegetable broth with a meaty flavor. I’m usually not a fan of using imitation meat products, because I try to stick to whole foods, but I think the gardein beefless tips work really well with this soup.

vegan Caldo de res or vegan Mexican beef soup is a warm comforting soup of stewed beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.

Caldo de res is also known as puchero, or cocido de res. The ingredients vary by region, depending on what state of Mexico you are in you can find caldo de res with garbanzo beans, green beans, and plantain.  Some regions of Mexico use a tomato based broth. The soup itself is not spicy, but when I eat it I like to add a tbsp. of salsa roja to spice it up a bit. Serve it with Mexican rice, warm tortillas, and be sure to add a splash of lime juice to the soup before eating.

vegan Caldo de res or vegan Mexican beef soup is a warm comforting soup of stewed beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.

The Recipe: Vegan Caldo de Res

  • Sauté the beefless tips while they are still frozen.
  • Instead of veg stock you can use Better Than Bouillon No Beef Base
  • Instead of beefless tips use shitake mushrooms instead.
  • Don’t simmer the beefless tips in the soup, because it changes the texture. Add them in before serving,
  • Enjoy!
Caldo de res or vegan Mexican beef soup is a warm comforting soup of stewed beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.
5 from 1 vote
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Vegan Caldo de Res

Vegan caldo de res (vegan Mexican beef soup) is a warm comforting soup of no-beef, carrots, potatoes, corn, chayote, potatoes, mint, and cilantro. It is served all year, but is especially good in the winter months.
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
221 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 pack (9 oz.) Gardein Beefless tips
  • 1 cup Diced onions, yellow (1/2 onion)
  • 4 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 10 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 3 sprigs Mint
  • 3 sprigs Cilantro
  • 1 ear Corn, cut into 1 inch rounds
  • 1 ½ cups Diced russet potato (1 medium potato)
  • 1 cup Diced carrots (1 lg. Carrot)
  • 2 cups Large diced cabbage (1/4 head of cabbage)
  • 1 ¼ cups Diced chayote (1 chayote)
  • 1 ¼ cups Diced zucchini (1 zucchini)
  • 1 lime Cut into quarters

Preparation

  1. Set a large pot to medium-high heat (if necessary add a little bit of oil). Sear the beefless tips for 2 minutes on each side. Remove from pot and set aside.
  2. Add onion and ¼ cup of vegetable stock to deglaze the bottom of the pot. Cook onion for 4-5 minutes or until tender and translucent.
  3. Add garlic and cook for 1 more minute.
  4. Pour in vegetable stock and add the mint and cilantro.
  5. Bring to slow simmer and add the corn, carrots, and potatoes.
  6. Simmer for 6 minutes and then add the chayote, zucchini, and cabbage.
  7. Simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Season with salt and pepper.
  8. Cut the beefless tips in half, and add about 1/3 cup to each bowl. Pour soup on top and serve.
  9. Serve with lime wedges and warm tortillas.

Chef's Notes

Sauté the beefless tips while they are still frozen. Instead of veg stock you can use no beef better than bouillon. I add the “beef” at the end, because if you simmer it in the soup it changes the texture. If you don’t have access to beefless tips use shiitake mushrooms instead.

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Caldo de Res
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 221 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Sodium 2678mg116%
Potassium 758mg22%
Carbohydrates 37g12%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 18g36%
Vitamin A 6910IU138%
Vitamin C 39.6mg48%
Calcium 76mg8%
Iron 4.1mg23%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

I’ve been a fan of the blog Veggies Don’t Bite for a while. It was one of the first blogs that I found when I first went vegan that made me think I could actually make the change! Sophia de Santis is the founder of Veggies Don’t Bite, and she has just released her new cookbook Vegan Burgers & Burritos: Easy and Delicious Whole Food Recipes for the Everyday Cook. Today I’m sharing with you this chipotle and lime burrito stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sauteed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

What’s exciting about this book is that it’s plant-based, meaning it focuses on whole foods, doesn’t have refined sugars, and even includes gluten-free options. Also, who doesn’t like burgers and burritos? Our family loves them, they are some of the few things my kids will eat without questioning what’s in it.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

Every recipe has a beautiful picture, and includes 27 burgers, and 26 burritos. It also has a section with sides, and sauces to top your burger or burrito. Some of our favorite recipes so far are the Fajita your Burger, Sweet Potato Enchilada Burger, Frito Pie Pouches, and of course the Chipotle and Lime Burritos. I love the book so far, but I wish there was a recipe for burger buns and tortillas. I don’t know about you, but I struggle to find a burger bun that doesn’t have refined sugar in it.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

From the kitchen perspective, the recipes are easy to make and don’t use weird or hard to find ingredients. Plus, burgers and burritos are very convenient lunch or picnic options, because they are portable. They also make great game day or tailgating food to munch on. Vegan Burgers and Burritos is available on Amazon in paperback and kindle. Enjoy!

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

The Recipe: Chipotle and Lime Burrito

Serve with homemade salsa or smoky tangy cream sauce. You could also eat this on warm corn tortillas.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.
5 from 1 vote
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Chipotle and Lime Burritos

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Chopped red, yellow and green bell pepper mix
  • ½ cup Chopped spicy pepper of choice (jalapeño, cherry bomb, etc.)
  • ½ cup Chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup Low-sodium veggie broth or drizzle of oil, for sautéing
  • 1 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1 tsp. Garlic Powder
  • 2 tbsp. Fresh lime juice

RICE AND BEANS

  • 1 ½ cups Cooked brown rice
  • 1 cup Cooked or canned black beans, drained and rinsed
  • ¼ cup Chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tbsp Fresh lime juice
  • ¾ tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp chipotle powder

TO SERVE

  • 4 to 5 to tortillas
  • Avocado
  • Shredded cabbage
  • Smoky Tangy Cream (page 135) or World’s Best Roasted Salsa (page 132)

Preparation

  1. Sauté the peppers and onion in a pan over medium heat with veggie broth, salt, garlic powder and lime juice until cooked and fragrant, about 10 to 12 minutes. You may need to add more broth if it gets too dry. The mixture is ready when the veggies are soft and almost sticky looking.
  2. To make the rice and beans, put the cooked rice, beans, cilantro, lime juice, salt and chipotle powder in a bowl and mix well.
  3. Once everything is ready, build the burritos by filling the tortillas with the rice and beans, sautéed veggies, avocado and shredded cabbage.
  4. Drizzle the sauce or salsa over the filling ingredients.
  5. To fold the burrito, fold the sides over toward the center, then roll upward to create a burrito. (See page 15 for step-by-step photos.) You can grill the seam for 7 to 8 minutes until it seals and closes the burrito. You can also grill the other side to make it crisp.
  6. Kids: This can be served as a bowl if folding a burrito is too hard! Do not add spicy peppers or chipotle powder. Substitute spicy peppers with bell peppers.

DisclosureI received a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

Every country across the world has its own way of celebrating Christmas. Mexico has many wonderful Christmas traditions, but one of the most important is the food. It’s not Christmas without pozole, tamales, buñuelos, or ponche. Another one of those important dishes is this vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína.

This post contains affiliate links.

Bacalao a la Vizcaína is a braised salt cod dish with tomatoes, garlic, olives, capers, roasted peppers, and potatoes. Depending what part of the country you are in they also add raisins and slivered almonds. For this vegan version I️ have used mashed chickpeas to replace the salt cod. The dish is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is mostly consumed in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve. Serve it with rice or crusty bread to soak up to the last drop of the stew.

What are some of your favorite Christmas foods? My favorite is without a doubt tamales, and the are super easy to veganize! My favorite Christmas traditions are decorating the tree as a family, pedir posada, and singing Happy birthday to Jesus, and then having the kids kiss little baby Jesus on Christmas Eve. Ok, so there’s a lot of stuff I️ like about Christmas! I️ would love to hear some of your traditions.

The Recipe: Vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína

I have used two cans of chickpeas, but if you want to add a different texture you can add a couple of hearts or artichoke hearts, but feel free to use one or the other. To give this a fishy flavor you can use dulse flakes or finely chopped nori seaweed. Enjoy!

This vegan bacalao a la vizcaína is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is served in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve.
5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaína

This vegan bacalao a la vizcaína is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is served in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword christmas recipes, vegan bacalao, vegan mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 3 minutes
Servings 6 Servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 10 Plum tomatoes, medium, (3 cups roasted tomato puree)
  • 1 White onion, diced, (about 2 cups)
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 cans (14 oz.) Chickpeas, drained, mashed with a fork
  • 1/3 cup Sliced, pitted manzanilla olives
  • 1 tbsp. Capers
  • 3 Red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1-2 tsp. Finely chopped nori flakes
  • 1 lb. New potatoes, cooked, peeled, cut in half
  • 1/4 cup Parsley, chopped
  • 3 Pickled pepperoni or banana peppers whole or sliced

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven broiler to HI. Place tomatoes on a sheet try and place under the broiler for 4 minutes, until the tomatoes begin to brown and be covered in black spots.
  2. Turn the tomatoes and leave in oven for 4 more minutes. Remove from oven. Using your blender, process until you have a smooth puree. Strain and set aside.
  3. Heat a large pot to medium-low heat and add ¼ cup of water. Add onions and let cook until tender and transparent, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, and cook for 1 more minute.
  4. Pour in tomato puree, and bring it up to a simmer.
  5. Add chickpeas, olives, capers, red peppers, bay leaf, and nori flakes. Continue to simmer for 5-6 minutes. Stir well.

  6. Add parsley, potatoes, pickled banana peppers. Let simmer for 8 more minutes. If the sauce thickens too much, adjust with vegetable stock or water.
  7. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Chef's Notes

If you are looking for a fishy taste use 2 tsp. of nori flakes. Serve with rice or crusty bread. The pickled pepper can be spicy or mild depending on your preference. In some states they add raisins and slivered almonds, you can add those as well. If you would like to add more texture to the dish you can add hearts of palm or artichoke hearts.

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