Vegan Mexican Recipes easy to follow, delicious, and healthy.

These are Guanajuato’s famous Vegan Potato Enchiladas (Enchiladas Mineras) filled with a sautéed onion and mushroom mix, smothered in a guajillo enchilada sauce, and topped with tender potatoes and carrots, crema, shredded lettuce, and jalapeños en escabeche.

tofu crema in blender for vegan potato enchiladas

 

Enchiladas are one of those Mexican dishes that have an infinite number of variations depending on the region. These easy vegan enchiladas are called enchiladas mineras or miner’s enchiladas, because Guanajuato was once the world’s silver-extraction center (18th century). Guanajuato is a state in central Mexico, its capital, the city of Guanajuato is a UNESCO world heritage site, famous for its beautiful examples of Baroque architecture.

White strainer full of cooked diced potatoes and carrots

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Cast iron pan with sauteed mushrooms for vegan potato enchiladas

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe is representing Guanajuato and is the creation of Enrique Rodriquez, here he tells you a bit of his story:

Sauce pot filled with red enchilada sauce and a wooden spoon showing the sauce

My name is Enrique Rodriguez and I’m from the city of Irapuato in the state of Guanajuato, and I have been vegan for more than 4 years. Ever since I was a child I wondered what vegetarianism was all about and always declared myself a lover of animals. So much so, that I stopped eating fish, because my first pets were fish, except for tuna in a can, probably because I couldn’t see the fish’s corpse, hahaha.

vegan potato enchiladas topped with carrots, potatoes, lettuce, and crema in a large blue bowl

As an adult, I met a group of animal activists in Irapuato, and that’s how it all started. I began researching veganism and in one week I stopped eating all animal products. It was easy for me, since I didn’t really like eating meat to begin with, and I learned to substitute it with beans and vegetables such as garbanzos, lentils, mushrooms, etc. My love for cooking and animals grew, and I began to veganize every recipe I came across, and now this lifestyle will accompany me forever.

 

vegan potato enchiladas topped with carrots, potatoes, lettuce, and crema in a large blue bowl

 

The Recipe: Vegan Potato Enchiladas (Enchiladas Mineras)

Traditionally this recipe uses quite a bit of oil. I have opted for a healthier version, but if you don’t mind the oil you can follow the traditional methods. To do so, after dipping the tortilla in the sauce fry them lightly in a large sauteé pan with 1 tbsp. of oil. Fill the tortilla then fold in half. In the same pan you fried the tortillas fry the potato and carrots.

If you are allergic to nuts you can make a tofu crema by blending: 1 lb. of silken tofu, 2 tbsp. lemon juice, 1 clove of garlic, 1/3 cup of water or unsweetened almond milk, 1 tsp. of nutritional yeast, and salt and pepper to taste.

The enchilada sauce is not very spicy, so if you like spicy food add 1 to 2 chiles de arbol to the sauce.

vegan potato enchiladas topped with carrots, potatoes, lettuce, and crema in a large blue bowl
4.8 from 5 votes
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Vegan Potato Enchiladas (Enchiladas Mineras)

These are Guanajuato’s famous Vegan Potato Enchiladas (Enchiladas Mineras) filled with a sautéed onion and mushroom mix, smothered in a guajillo enchilada sauce, and topped with tender potatoes and carrots, crema, shredded lettuce, and jalapeños en escabeche.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword easy enchiladas, vegan enchiladas, vegan mexican recipes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Medium Idaho potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 4 Medium carrots, peeled, and cubed

Enchilada Sauce

  • 15 Dried Guajillo chiles, stems and seed removed
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • ¼ tsp. Ground cumin
  • ½ tsp. Mexican oregano, dried

Filling

  • 1 lb. Cremini, oyster or maitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 Onion, large, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 cups Favorite shredded vegan cheese (optional)
  • 12 Corn tortillas

Garnish

  • Almond Crema
  • Jalapeños en Escabeche, sliced
  • 2 cups Shredded romaine or iceberg lettuce

Preparation

To make the enchilada sauce

  1. On a skillet or comal set to medium heat, toast the guajillo chiles for a couple seconds on each side.
  2. Place the chiles in a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Let sit for 10 minutes.
  3. Place the soaked chiles, garlic, cumin, oregano, and 2 cups of the chile soaking liquid and process until smooth. Strain and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

For the filling

  1. Add ¼ cup of water or vegetable stock to a large sauté pan set to medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until almost all the moisture has evaporated from the mushrooms and they are beginning to brown. Add more liquid if necessary.
  2. Add the onion and garlic and continue cooking until the onion is tender and translucent about 6 more minutes. Add more liquid as necessary. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  3. Place potatoes in a medium saucepot with cold water and salt. Bring to a low simmer and let cook for 5 minutes, add carrots and let cook for 3 to 4 minutes more or until the potatoes and carrots are tender. Strain and set aside.

Assembly

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

  2. Bring enchilada sauce to a very low simmer in a medium saucepot, dip a tortilla in the warm sauce, very quickly, and place on a plate. Fill with mushroom mixture and vegan cheese and fold the tortilla over. Place on serving platter. Repeat this process with the rest of the tortillas.

  3. Pour some extra sauce on top of the enchiladas and spread with a spoon. Place in oven for 5 to 6 minutes to melt the vegan cheese. (You can omit this step if you’re not using cheese).

  4. Remove from oven. Top enchiladas with the potato-carrot mixture, shredded lettuce, jalapeños en escabeche, and drizzle crema on top and serve.

Chef's Notes

Traditionally this recipe uses quite a bit of oil. I have opted for a healthier version, but if you don’t mind the oil you can follow the traditional methods. To do so, after dipping the tortilla in the sauce fry them lightly in a large sauteé pan with 1 tbsp. of oil. Fill the tortilla then fold in half. In the same pan you fried the tortillas fry the potato and carrots.

If you are allergic to nuts you can make a tofu crema by blending: 1 lb. of silken tofu, 2 tbsp. lemon juice, 1 clove of garlic, 1/3 cup of water or unsweetened almond milk, 1 tsp. of nutritional yeast, and salt and pepper to taste.

The enchilada sauce is not very spicy, so if you like spicy food add 1 to 2 chiles de arbol to the sauce. 

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

Is there a dish more Mexican than mole poblano? For hundreds of years it has been the pride of Mexican gastronomy, but what is mole poblano?? Mole is a traditional Mexican sauce with over 18 different ingredients. It is a not a chocolate sauce!! Though chocolate is one of the ingredients. The combination of flavors is unlike anything you have ever eaten, and the richness and depth of the sauce is remarkable.

Ingredients for mole poblano recipe displayed on a dark wooden board

There are several varieties of mole, but today we will be making mole poblano, which as the name states is from the Mexican state of Puebla. This version is of course vegan! It’s really important to mention this because not all of the mole pastes you can buy at the grocery store or markets are vegan. Some are made with lard and chicken stock, so it’s always best to check the ingredients.

Large stainless steel bowl filled with dry chiles soaking in water

Onions, tomatoes, and garlic simmering in water in a pot for mole poblano recipe

History of Mole Poblano

Mole is a dish with pre-Hispanic roots, mentioned in Bernardino de Sahagún’s General History of Things of New Spain (1569). In the manuscript it is mentioned that a stew was served to Monctezuma made with chilies, tomatoes, and ground pumpkin seeds. Also, the name “mulli” was given to several types of sauces, and it is thought that moles were prepared as an offering to the gods.

nuts, bread, tortillas, sesame seed and spices in a cast iron pan

During colonial times two myths arise about the origin of mole poblano. My favorite is the story of the convent of Santa Rosa de Lima. It is said that mole poblano originated in the convent around 1685 by Sor. Andrea de la Asunción. Sor. Andrea was very famous for her skills in the kitchens of the convent and was asked to make a special dinner for the bishop Don Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz and the viceroy Conde de Paredes and Marques de la Laguna.

Soaked chiles in blender for mole poblano recipe

She selected a variety of ingredients for her special dish, chiles, bitter chocolate, sesame, anise, cloves, almonds, peanuts, and pumpkin seeds. Everything was ground in the metate and mole poblano was born. However, it is unlikely that this story is true, since there is proof of mole’s prehispanic origins, but perhaps this nun added her own special touch to this dish.Pureed chiles in blender

 

Our Vegan Mexico

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Nut sauce in blender

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Puebla, is the creation of Chantall Vigueras of @mamavegetal here she tells you a bit of her story.

Piloncillo, chocolate, and bouillon cubes in a large pot

 

Chantall’s Story

In 2010 vegetarianism came to my life, because I believed that it wasn’t necessary to eat animals in order to live at their expense, but I still consumed fish and cheese without knowing everything that was behind their production. At that time I didn’t know much, but I began learning along the way.  In 2015 Chantall Vegetal was born promoting the philosophy of veganism. I’ve been veganizing and creating dishes for almost five years! My love for cooking, the planet, and life without violence were what prompted me to want to share this lifestyle. I want to encourage and help others include more plant-based foods in their day to day life with my content, which I create with love.

 

Clay pot filled with mole poblano

 Mole Poblano Recipe

  • This recipe is time-consuming but not complicated at all!!
  • The recipe makes mole paste, which you can freeze or save in the fridge for later use. To use the paste all you need to do is add enough vegetable stock to get it to the right consistency and let it simmer for a couple of minutes, then serve.
  • You can make enmoladas with this or serve it over potatoes, chayote, and zucchini with rice.
  • If you want to make this without oil you can toast the ingredients, that were meant to be fried, in the oven until a dark golden Brown.
  • There were some chiles I couldn’t find easily and I purchased these on Amazon: Chile Mulato and chile chipotle.

 

Enmoladas in a clay plate surrounded by mole ingredients

Clay pot filled with mole poblano
5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Mole Poblano Recipe and Enmoladas

Is there a dish more Mexican this mole poblano recipe? Mole is a traditional Mexican sauce with over 18 different ingredients!
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword mole poblano, vegan mexican
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 12 servings
394 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Mole Poblano Paste

  • 7 Ancho chiles
  • 6 Mulato Chiles
  • 6 Pasilla Chiles
  • 3 Chipotle chiles dried
  • 1 Onion, small
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 2/3 cup Raisins
  • ¾ cup Raw peanuts, unsalted
  • 2/3 cup Almonds
  • 1/3 cup Pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1/3 cup Sesame seeds
  • 2 Corn tortillas, cut into fourths
  • 1 Bolillo, a couple of days old, sliced
  • 1 Ripe plantain, peeled sliced
  • 1 stick Ceylon cinnamon broken into pieces
  • 3 Whole cloves
  • ½ tsp. Anise seed
  • ½ cone Piloncillo
  • 1 tablet Mexican chocolate (Ibarra)
  • 1 L Water or vegetable stock
  • 2 Vegetable bouillon cubes (optional)
  • 1 tsp. Black peppercorns
  • Olive oil or avocado oil

ENMOLADAS

  • Corn Tortillas
  • 8 oz. Mushrooms, sliced
  • ¼ Onion, thinly sliced

Garnish for Enmoladas

  • Toasted sesame seeds
  • Crumbled tofu
  • Thin onion slices
  • Avocado

Preparation

MOLE POBLANO PASTE

  1. Clean, and remove the seeds and stems from the dried chiles. Using a comal or cast iron pan set to médium heat toast the chiles. Be careful not to burn them or the sauce will be bitter. Once they are lightly toasted submerge them in a pot full of boiling wáter and let soak for 20 minutes.
  2. While the chiles are soaking, bring a médium pot of water to a simmer and add the tomato, onion, and garlic. Simmer for about 6-7 minutes or until the tomates begin to lose their skins and the onion is tender. Drain and set aside.
  3. Once the chiles are soft and pliable, place them in the blender with 1 cup of water or some of the soaking liquid. Blend until smooth. Strain and set aside.
  4. Heat a large saute pan to médium-high heat and add vegetable oil. Fry the raisins, pumpkin seeds, peanuts, almonds, tortilla, bolillo, and plantain one at a time until deep golden brown, almost burnt!
  5. Place all of the fried ingredients in the blender with the cinnamon stick, clove, anise seed, black peppercorns, and sesame seeds. Add 1 cup of water and blend. Add as much water as necessary to get your blender to process all of the ingredients into a smooth thick sauce. Strain and set aside.
  6. In a large pot (preferably clay), set to médium heat, add ½ cup of water, piloncillo, vegetable bouillon and Mexican chocolate. Stir constantly until it dissolves.
  7. Add the chile mixture and the nut-bread mixture, and mix well to incorpórate. Season to taste with salt and pepper if needed.
  8. Continue mixing constantly with a wooden spoon and bring to a low simmer. Simmer for 15 minutes and recheck seasoning. Let cool in pot. Now it is ready to use or store.

MOLE POBLANO ENMOLADAS

  1. Place 1 cup of the mole paste in a médium sauce pot. Add ½ cup of water or vegetable stock and bring to a low simmer. Stir to incorpórate. Add more liquid if necesary to get the right consistency.
  2. In a large saute pan, saute the onions and mushrooms until golden brown. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Soften your corn tortillas by heating them briefly in the oven or microwave until the roll easily.
  4. Fill the tortillas with the mushroom mixture and roll. Place on a plate and pour mole sauce on top of them.
  5. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and top with sliced onions, avocado and crumbled tofu.

Chef's Notes

This recipe is time consuming but not complicated at all!!

• The recipe makes mole paste, which you can freeze or sabe in the fridge for later use. To use the paste all you need to do is add enough vegetable stock to get it to the right consistency and let it simmer for a couple of minutes, then serve.

• You can make enmoladas with this or serve it over potatoes, chayote and zucchini with rice. • If you want to make this without oil you can toast the ingredients, that were meant to be fried, in the oven until a dark golden brown.

• There were some chiles I couldn’t find easily and I purchased those on Amazon: chile mulato and chile chipotle.

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Mole Poblano Recipe and Enmoladas
Amount Per Serving
Calories 394 Calories from Fat 117
% Daily Value*
Fat 13g20%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 168mg7%
Potassium 795mg23%
Carbohydrates 40g13%
Fiber 11g46%
Sugar 14g16%
Protein 9g18%
Vitamin A 6590IU132%
Vitamin C 13mg16%
Calcium 92mg9%
Iron 4.1mg23%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

These vegan meatballs are made with a mixture of black beans, rice, and sautéed mushrooms and served in a   tomato and chile ancho broth. They are ridiculously easy to make and they are one of those meals that remind you of long afternoons sitting at your abuela’s table eating as a family. (If you’re looking for more meaty vegan meatballs you can try these.)

Sauted mushroom in a large saute pan

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Roasted tomatoes, onion, dried peppers, and garlic in a cast iron pan

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Durango, is the creation of Gaby from @unamamavegana, here she tells you a bit of her story.

bread crumbs, mushrooms, rice, and beans in a food processor

Gaby’s Story:

Many people ask me why I am vegan. On March 2015 my husband, then 40 years old, underwent a complicated open-heart surgery. A hereditary medical condition, of which he wasn’t aware of, completely blocked 2 of his arteries. We lived a very difficult stage as a family.

Ingredients mixed in a food processor

My children were so little, and their dad was very young. It was a case that the doctors just couldn’t believe. Fortunately, everything went well, and my husband drastically changed his habits and began to take great care of himself. Shortly after, I was diagnosed with several autoimmune diseases and the doctors recommended a Mediterranean anti-inflammatory diet as part of my treatment.

vegan meatballs in a cast iron pan

So three years ago we hardly ate meat, and shortly before last summer, he decided to become vegan, and I told him,” Yes, I’ll do it with you!”  Because it’s what I can do from my trench, it’s how I can take care of him because I love him, and it’s also how I can motivate and encourage him. From there on everything came naturally, it became a decision and commitment that we made as a family, very convinced that we are on the right path.

Tomato chile broth in a stain less steel sauce pot

The Recipe: Mexican Vegan Meatballs in Tomato Chile Broth

The cuisine of Durango has a very defined mestizo quality. Its gastronomy has a strong pre-Hispanic and Spanish heritage. Because of its location in the northwest of the country, Durango sheltered in its desert lands semi-nomadic peoples, this characteristic that led them to dehydrate their food for transportation. Among them meat, chiles, and fruits.

4 vegan meatballs in a clay bowl on a blue kitchen towel

Reading a little about their typical dishes, I wanted to find a recipe that would rescue their mestizo identity. Rice and beans are key ingredients, and the mushrooms replace the meat. The figs and mint will give the perfect touch to these meatballs.

4 vegan meatballs in a clay bowl on a blue kitchen towel

4 vegan meatballs in a clay bowl on a blue kitchen towel
5 from 1 vote
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Mexican Vegan Meatballs in Tomato Chile Broth

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword black beans, mushrooms, vegan meatballs
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
422 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

Meatballs:

  • 7 oz. Sliced cremini mushrooms (about 10 mushrooms)
  • 2 cups Cooked white rice
  • 2 cups Cooked black beans, drained
  • 1 srpig Fresh mint, finely chopped
  • 5 Dried figs, finely chopped
  • 1 1/4 cups Bread crumbs, adjust for consistency
  • 1 tsp. Salt

For the broth:

  • 5 Tomatoes, medium size
  • 1/2 White onion, medium size
  • 1 clove Garlic,
  • 2 Ancho chiles, deseeded
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 cup Water or vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp. Olive oil

Preparation

To make the meatballs:

  1. Heat a large sauté pan to medium-high heat, add a little bit of oil (optional), and sauté mushrooms until golden brown, about 6-7 minutes. Remove mushrooms from pan and set aside.

  2. Using a food processor, mix the mushrooms, rice, black beans, figs, mint, bread crumbs, and salt. Pulse a couple of times until everything incorporated together, but is not completely mashed. Try to preserve some of the texture of the beans and rice.
  3. Shape the mix into equal sized balls. In the same sauté pan, set to medium heat, brown the meatballs in a little bit of oil until golden brown all over. (You can also bake them at 375°F for 20 to 30 min, flipping them half-way through.)

To make the tomato chile broth:

  1. In a comal or cast-iron skillet set to médium-high heat, dry roast the tomato, chiles, garlic, and onion until they have dark spots all over.
  2. Add the tomato, chile, garlic, onion, and vegetable broth to the blender and process until you have a smooth broth. Strain.
  3. In a medium sauce pot heat 1 tsp. of olive oil. Add the tomato broth and let simmer for 5 minutes or until it changes to a dark red color and slightly thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  4. Serve your meatballs in the tomato chile broth.
Nutrition Facts
Mexican Vegan Meatballs in Tomato Chile Broth
Amount Per Serving
Calories 422 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Fat 4g6%
Sodium 1306mg57%
Potassium 968mg28%
Carbohydrates 81g27%
Fiber 13g54%
Sugar 13g14%
Protein 16g32%
Vitamin A 1405IU28%
Vitamin C 25.7mg31%
Calcium 134mg13%
Iron 4.3mg24%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

 

This salsa molcajeteada combines pan roasted tomatoes, garlic, and peppers to make a spicy and hearty salsa. They are ground down in an authentic Mexican molcajete. It is a staple in all Mexican homes, super easy to make, even if you don’t have a molcajete, and it adds a perfect touch of spiciness to any meal.

Charred tomatoes, peppers, and onion in a sheet tray lined with foil.

This recipe is from our housekeeper Polita, or I should say my parents’ housekeeper. I wish I had a housekeeper!!! She has worked with us for over 20 yrs. She was my nanny, as well as the house cook, and seamstress. Over the years she has become more of a companion for my mother and a beloved part of our family.

Garlic in a molcajete for salsa molcajeteada

Garlic ground to a paste in the molcajete

Let me tell you she likes her salsa hot!! She makes it in my mom’s molcajete, which I desperately tried to get here to give to me, but she refused. I can have it when she’s dead, she said. Because of this I had to buy a molcajete from Sur la Table!! It’s actually harder than you would think to find a good quality molcajete in the US. It might be easier now from Amazon than a couple of years ago.

Peppers ground to a paste in the molcajete

Be careful of cheap molcajetes because they might be made with cement and not volcanic stone. There are ways to tell if your molcajete is made with cement or volcanic rock. Usually a molcajete made with cement will not release any grit or if it does it will be a fine powder. A real volcanic rock molcajete will release grit into your food until it is properly seasoned.

Two tomatoes on top of chile puree in the molcajete

Once you determine that your molcajete is real, you will have to season it, unless you bought it already seasoned. To season it you basically have to grind a mixture of rice and a little bit of water, over and over again until the paste comes out white. You can see step-by-step instructions here.

Salsa molcajeteada in a large molcajete surrounded by tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic

Now you’re all set! When I use the molcajete to make salsa I feel so connected to my roots and my people. I don’t know if it’s the repetitive motion that gets you thinking, but just to think that hundreds of years have passed, and I can still make salsa the way my great-great grandma did is something truly special.

making salsa

 

The Recipe: Salsa Molcajeteada

  • Warning!! This salsa is hot. If you would like a medium heat to your salsa omit the serrano peppers. If you can find them use chilaca peppers instead of anaheim.
  • To make this recipe even quicker you can place your peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and onion under your oven broiler set to HIGH until they are charred. Be sure to flip them halfway through so they char evenly.
  • If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.
  • Enjoy!!

Salsa molcajeteada in a large molcajete surrounded by tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic

4.09 from 12 votes
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Salsa Molcajeteada

This salsa molcajeteada combines pan roasted tomatoes, garlic, and peppers to make a spicy and hearty salsa. Made in an authentic molcajete.
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword authentic mexican salsa, molcajete salsa
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 2 cups
99 kcal
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 3 Plum tomatoes, small
  • 1 Beefsteak tomato
  • 1/4 White onion
  • 3 cloves Garlic, unpeeled
  • 1 Poblano Pepper
  • 1 Anaheim pepper
  • 1 Jalapeño
  • 2 Serrano Peppers
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt (plus more as needed)
  • 1/4 cup Chopped cilantro

Preparation

  1. Cut off the stems of the peppers and the tops of the tomatoes. 

  2. Heat a griddle or cast iron pan to high heat. Place all of the peppers, tomatoes, onion, and garlic on the griddle until they become soft and slightly blackened, about 7-10 min. (See note)

  3. Flip peppers, tomatoes, onion, and garlic and continue to char for another 5- 7 minutes. (The garlic will be done before the peppers and onions are finished cooking. Simply remove them from the griddle.)

  4. Remove ingredients from griddle and set aside. Peel most of the dark burnt skin off of the tomatoes and chiles. You can leave a little bit for the smoky flavor. Peel the garlic. 

  5. To start grinding ingredients in molcajete, place 1/2 tsp. of salt and the garlic in the molcajete. Grind down until a thick paste has been made. 

  6. Add the onion and grind down to a paste. Add the peppers and grind down one by one until you have the desired consistency. Add the tomatoes one by one and keep grinding. Chop cilantro and add it to the molcajete. Season to taste and serve. 

  7. If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.

Chef's Notes

Warning!! This salsa is hot. If you would like a medium heat to your salsa omit the serrano peppers. If you can find them use chilaca peppers instead of anaheim. 

To make this recipe even quicker you can place your peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and onion under your oven broiler set to HIGH until they are charred. Be sure to flip them halfway through so they char evenly.

If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.

Nutrition Facts
Salsa Molcajeteada
Amount Per Serving
Calories 99
% Daily Value*
Sodium 115mg5%
Potassium 1000mg29%
Carbohydrates 22g7%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 4g8%
Vitamin A 3440IU69%
Vitamin C 113.7mg138%
Calcium 50mg5%
Iron 1.2mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

This Chiapas tofu avocado scramble is a traditional dish gone vegan, from one of Mexico’s southern states. The tofu is scrambled with a mixture of spices, beans, and lightly fried tortillas strips. It is topped with sliced avocado, crema, and pickled jalapeños.

Tofu crumbled into a large glass bowl for making a tofu avocado scramble

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union. With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet.

Spice mixture poured over crumbled tofu in a large glass bowl.

This recipe was created by the talented Alejandra Zavala. Here she is telling you a little bit of her story:

Alejandra’s Story:

I’m Mexican, born in Sonora!! A little more than two years ago my life took a huge turn. An antinuclear antibody test came back positive, and another series of lab tests finally determined the reason for my inexplicable fatigue, constant pain in my body and bones, hair loss, and gradual loss of hearing in my left ear. My immune system was weak, damaged, and my defenses, just like me, were tired. I returned home with many medications, that I was told I would need to take for life and an enormous sadness.

Tofu cooking in a black non-stick saute pan

It was then that my supervisor told me about the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle, and I decided to investigate. It has been only a year since I started nourishing my body on a plant-based diet and I have been reborn! I no longer feel pain or fatigue, my hair is beautiful, and I take zero medication!! Today, a few months from graduating as a holistic nutrition life coach I feel that my life has taken another turn, but this time one of light and health.

Fried tortilla strips added to tofu in black pan

When Dora launched her project to invite our people to try just how delicious eating a plant-based diet can be, my heart jumped for joy! I wanted to make a special dish, and for me, breakfast is something very close to my heart, because it takes me to when I was a little girl and my family sat down on weekends to have breakfast together.

Pinto beans added to tofu in black pan

This Chiapas avocado tofu scramble is very easy to make, full of nutrients and a lot of protein, but above all, it is full of tradition from the state of Chiapas. Mexican cuisine is so versatile that on a plant-based diet you will enjoy it even more!! I hope you like it. With love,  @saucyrabanillo

You can follow Ale on her Instagram @saucyrabanillo 

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

The Recipe: Chiapas Tofu Avocado Scramble

  • This recipe will show you step-by-step how to make a tofu scramble, it is really quite easy, and delicious. The recipe doesn’t call for it, but if you can find Indian black salt ( Kala Namak) you can get the tofu to taste like egg, because of the sulfur in the salt.
  • This recipe will be even more delicious if you use homemade beans, but if you don’t have time you can use canned beans without a problem.
  • If you don’t want to use oil, you can bake your tortilla strips.
  • You can use your favorite vegan cheese as a topping for this.
  • If you can’t find or don’t like cashews you can make this almond crema.
  • Enjoy!

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it
5 from 1 vote
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Chiapas Avocado Tofu Scramble

This Chiapas tofu avocado scramble, cooked with spices, beans, and tortillas strips. Topped with avocado, crema, and pickled jalapeños.
Course Breakfast
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword tofu scramble, vegan mexican breakfast
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
388 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. Tofu firm, drained
  • 1 tbsp. Garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp. Onion powder
  • 1 tsp. Nutritional yeast (optional)
  • ¼ tsp. Smoked paprika
  • ¼ tsp. Ground cumin
  • 2 tbsp. Avocado oil, or your oil of preference
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 cup Cooked pinto beans, with some broth
  • 3 Corn tortillas, cut into strips
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • Pickled jalapeños
  • 4 slices Vegan cheese (optional)

Cashew Crema

  • ¼ cup Raw cashews
  • 2 tbsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • 2 tsp. Apple cider vinegar
  • Salt to taste

Preparation

Making the tofu scramble

  1. Crumble the tofu with your hands, until it has the consistency of scrambled eggs. In a small bowl, mix the garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, nutritional yeast, cumin, and salt. Add this spice mixture to the crumbled tofu and mix well.
  2. Heat a medium sauté pan to medium heat. Add 1 tbsp. of oil and cook the tofu until golden brown, about 6 to 7 minutes.
  3. In another sauté pan, set to medium heat, add the remaining tbsp. of oil and add the tortilla strips to the pan. Cook until golden brown and remove from the pan.

  4. Add the soupy beans and crispy tortilla strips to the tofu, and mix well. Season to taste.

  5. Serve topped with slices of vegan cheese, pickled jalapeño peppers, avocado slices, and cashew crema.

To prepare the Cashew Cream

  1. Soak the cashews in ½ cup of water for two hours.
  2. Once the cashews have soaked, place them in the blender with the soaking water, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and salt. Process until completely smooth and cream like.

Chef's Notes

  • The recipe doesn’t call for it, but if you can find Indian black salt ( Kala Namak) you can get the tofu to taste like egg, because of the sulfur in the salt.
  • This recipe will be even more delicious if you use homemade beans, but if you don’t have time you can use canned beans without a problem.
  • If you don’t want to use oil, you can bake your tortilla strips.
  • You can use your favorite vegan cheese as a topping for this.
  • If you can’t find or don’t like cashews you can make this almond crema.
Nutrition Facts
Chiapas Avocado Tofu Scramble
Amount Per Serving
Calories 388 Calories from Fat 216
% Daily Value*
Fat 24g37%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 138mg6%
Potassium 556mg16%
Carbohydrates 31g10%
Fiber 9g38%
Sugar 2g2%
Protein 17g34%
Vitamin A 225IU5%
Vitamin C 9.1mg11%
Calcium 207mg21%
Iron 3.7mg21%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

This Mexican Christmas apple salad is the perfect way to end your Christmas feast. After a meal of Christmas roast, tamales and pozole, this refreshing salad will hit the spot. Crisp apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans are mixed with a sweet almond crema.

Bowl of sweet cream on a dark wooden surface

This has to be one of my favorite childhood food memories, except that we added marshmallows to ours and it was almost sickly sweet. This healthier version is refreshing and sweetened with maple syrup. We would have this salad on Christmas of course, but my grandmother would make a different version for New Year’s with carrots and raisins which was also delicious. Depending on where in Mexico you are some people add raisins, carrots, celery, and even maraschino cherries.

Glass bowl filled with apples, pineapple, grapes, and pecans.

Traditionally this recipe uses crema or even mayonnaise, but I have made a crema with soaked almonds, water, almond milk, and maple syrup. You can also make the crema with cashews or use your favorite vegan yogurt. I prefer using almonds because they’re more affordable, but they are a bit more work because you have to peel them.

Sweet cream poured over fruit in a glass bowl.

Year after year, the longer I’m vegan the less I miss meat and the more I can appreciate veganizing traditional Mexican recipes and fulfilling all of my childhood food memories in a cruelty-free and healthy way. If you haven’t been vegan for long I just want to let you know that your palate does change, that you do adapt, and that it becomes easier and easier.

Fruit tossed in sweet cream in a glass bowl.

The Recipe: Mexican Christmas Apple Salad

  • As optional ingredients, you can add carrots, raisins or celery.
  • I recommend that you make and eat on the same day.
  • You can use your favorite vegan yogurt to make this recipe even quicker
  • Enjoy!!

 

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad in a glass cup on top of a peach colored napkin

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad in a glass cup
4 from 2 votes
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Mexican Christmas Apple Salad

Mexican Christmas Apple Salad, crisp apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans are mixed with a sweet almond crema.
Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword mexican fruit salad, vegan mexican christmas
Total Time 1 day
Servings 6 servings
189 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Diced gala apples (you can peel or not peel according to preference)
  • 3/4 cup Crushed pineapple, canned or fresh (drained)
  • 1 cup Green grapes, cut in half
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans

Sweet Almond Crema:

  • ½ cup Almonds, raw
  • ¼ - cup Water
  • ¼ cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 tsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • 1 tsp. Maple syrup

Preparation

  1. Bring 1 pint of water to a boil in a small sauce pot and pour over the almonds. Let soak overnight.
  2. The following day peel the almonds by pressing an almond between your thumb and forefinger and pressing lightly. The skin should just pop off.
  3. In a blender, place the almonds, almond milk, lemon juice, and maple syrup and blend at high speed until completely smooth and cream like (to get a super smooth sauce you will need a high powered blender).

  4. Place sauce in a small container and refrigerate for 30 min.
  5. In a large bowl combine the apples, pineapple, grapes, and chopped pecans. Pour sauce over it and mix well.
  6. Serve.

Chef's Notes

You can use cashews instead of almonds if you prefer. Some people add raisins, maraschino cherries, carrots, and even celery. If you want to go a little crazy you could add vegan mini marshmallows. I recommend that once you've tossed the fruit salad you serve it the same day. 

Nutrition Facts
Mexican Christmas Apple Salad
Amount Per Serving
Calories 189 Calories from Fat 108
% Daily Value*
Fat 12g18%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 14mg1%
Potassium 245mg7%
Carbohydrates 18g6%
Fiber 4g17%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 3g6%
Vitamin A 50IU1%
Vitamin C 4.7mg6%
Calcium 57mg6%
Iron 0.8mg4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Sauce pot filled with water, cinnamon, and piloncillo

Champurrado History

Champurrrado ingredients are quite simple but the combination is irresistible. Before the Spanish arrived in Mexico with their cows and their milk, champurrado was made with water.

Glass bowl with fresh masa

It is said that the great Aztec emperor Moctezuma Xocoyotzin enjoyed this beverage which he drank in ceremonial vessels made of gold, sweetened with agave honey, and spiced with a bit of chile.

Glass bowl filled with masa and water

Fray Bernardino de Sahagún documented the consumption of atoll or atolli which was drunk by the indigenous warm or cold, for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes.

Glass bowl with masa and water and a hand mixing it together.

Atole vs Champurrado

So what is the difference between atole and champurrado?? Atole is also a drink from pre-Columbian times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. Champurrado is simply atole with chocolate added to it, in other words, chocolate atole.

Bronze colored colander filled with the remnants of the strained masa

How to Make Champurrado

Making champurrado is quite easy, the piloncillo and cinnamon are simmered in water until completely dissolved, then a Mexican chocolate tablet is added. Once the chocolate has melted into the piloncillo mixture the fresh masa is added. The masa thickens the chocolate creating a thick, sweet, and chocolatey drink. Then everything is frothed with a molinillo and served hot.

Masa liquid being poured into a saucepot

The Recipe: How to Make Champurrado

This authentic Mexican champurrado is made with water instead of milk, just like in pre-Columbian times.

  • If you want to use milk I recommend you use almond-coconut milk.
  • The recipe calls for fresh masa, but if you can’t find it you can use masa harina.
  • I’ve used Ibarra chocolate, but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate.
  • Enjoy!!

Chapurrado in a sauce pot being frothed with a molinillo

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it
5 from 1 vote
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Champurrado

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Course Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword champurrado, chocolate, vegan mexican
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 cups
96 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup Chopped piloncillo (2-4 oz.)
  • 1 Mexican Chocolate disk (I used Ibarra, chopped into 4 pieces)
  • ½ cup Fresh masa for tortillas (nixtamal)

Preparation

  1. Place 3 cups of water, chopped piloncillo, and cinnamon stick in a medium sauce pot and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 1 to 2 minutes or until the piloncillo has completely dissolved.
  2. Add the Mexican chocolate and continue to simmer and stir until chocolate has completely dissolved, about 3 minutes.
  3. In the meantime place the fresh masa in a large bowl and pour 1 cup of water over the masa. Use your hand to dissolve the masa into the water.
  4. Strain the masa liquid, and pour it into the simmering hot chocolate. Stir and froth with a molinillo or whisk.
  5. Simmer for 6 to 8 minutes or until the champurrado has thickened. Serve hot!!

Chef's Notes

If you like your champurrado on the thick side use ¾ cup of fresh masa, but remember, the champurrado will continue to thicken as it cools. I used Ibarra chocolate but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate. If you can’t find fresh masa you can use 3/4 cup of masa harina.

Nutrition Facts
Champurrado
Amount Per Serving
Calories 96 Calories from Fat 27
% Daily Value*
Fat 3g5%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 14mg1%
Potassium 87mg2%
Carbohydrates 14g5%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 30IU1%
Calcium 41mg4%
Iron 2mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

This vegan poblano cream sauce pasta, which is my  version of an espagueti verde recipe is creamy, spicy, and delicious! This creamy poblano sauce is made with a combination of almonds, roasted poblano peppers, garlic, and cilantro. It’s blended until smooth then poured over your favorite pasta. My family usually makes it for Christmas, along with tamales, pozole, and buñuelos. It’s one of those dishes that is easy to make in large quantities so it’s perfect to take to a potluck or family gathering.

roasted poblano peppers on a sheet tray with parchment paper

This is the first Mexican recipe I veganized and published on this blog. I can’t believe it’s been 4 years of blogging professionally!! So much has happened since I started, and I’ve learned so much. But there’s still so much more to do and learn, and there are hundreds of vegan Mexican recipes yet to be made vegan.

ingredients for poblano cream sauce in blender

Along the way, I’ve discovered an amazing community of people just like me who are Mexican or Mexican-American who have taken the plunge into veganism and sorely missed the food of their mamas and abuelas. People like me who realize that food is such a big part of our culture and simply don’t want to miss out.

espagueti verde poblano cream sauce in blender

I hope my recipes inspire you to go vegan if you’re not already one, and if you are one, that these recipes can help keep the traditions alive in your family without the cruelty or detrimental effects to your health that eating an animal-based diet brings.

espagueti verde being tossed in a stainless steel bowl

The Recipe: Espagueti Verde

This “cream” sauce is made with raw almonds. You can use cashews instead if you like, but I think cashews are too sweet for this. It’s pretty amazing that you can make a cream sauce with nothing but some nut and a blender!!

  • If you do not have a high powered blender, you will have to soak the almonds the night before, and peel.
  • Toss the sauce with the pasta in a large bowl. Do not heat up sauce, if the sauce gets too hot it could break.
  • You can pour this on pasta or vegetable noodles. It also makes a great salsa for tacos.
  • If this is not spicy enough for you, throw in a jalapeño with the poblano peppers in the oven.
  • Enjoy!

spaghetti on green poblano sauce in a white bowl

spaghetti on green poblano sauce in a white bowl
5 from 3 votes
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Poblano Cream Sauce Pasta

This vegan espagueti verde recipe is creamy, spicy and rich. The roasted poblano cream sauce is perfect for tossing pasta in. 
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword poblano cream sauce, vegan mexican, vegan pasta
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 5 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup Almonds, raw
  • ¼ cup Unsweetened almond milk or vegetable oil (see note)
  • 1 clove Garlic, peeled
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped cilantro
  • 1 tbsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • 1 cup Water
  • 3 -4 Poblano peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded
  • To taste Salt
  • To taste Pepper
  • 1 lb. Spaghetti

Preparation

  1. Boil salted water in a large pot.
  2. Cook spaghetti according to the directions on the box.
  3. Meanwhile, place the almonds, almond milk, garlic, lemon juice, cilantro,water, and poblano peppers in the blender.

  4. Process until smooth, season with salt and pepper.
  5. Drain spaghetti and place in a large bowl.
  6. Add desired amount of sauce and toss.
  7. Serve immediately.

Chef's Notes

  • You can add more poblano peppers or an extra jalapeño to increase the heat factor, but I wouldn’t recommend using less than three.
  • If you want a really creamy sauce use oil instead of almond milk.
  • If you do not have a high powered blender, pour boiling water over the almonds and let sit overnight. The following day, peel them, and use in the recipe as directed. You will have to reduce the amount of water to 1/2 cup, then adjust accordingly. 

 

 

Christmas is around the corner, and I’m sure you’ve been looking for options for your Vegan Mexican Christmas menu.  I have crafted this incredible menu for you with the help of some blogger friends, so you can have a feast this Christmas. I wanted the menu to be similar to what a Mexican family might have for their Christmas Eve dinner, so there are some non-Mexican dishes like lasagna on there, because I do know families that make lasagna for Christmas. What are some of your favorite dishes??

Appetizer/Salad:

1. Nochebuena Salad

beet, apple and pomegranate salad                    dorastable.com

A refreshing salad of romaine lettuce, roasted beets, oranges, jicama, pomegranate, and peanuts. Find the recipe here.

2. Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco w/ Pineapple Chipotle Salsa

macadamia-nut-queso-fresco topped with salsa                                                      dorastable.com

Make a cheese platter with these macadamia nut cheese. It pairs well with nuts, fruits, and crackers or toasted baguette. Find recipe here. 

3. Mexican Hummus with Chiles Toreados

hummus in a blue bowl topped with charred onions and peppers                                          brownsugarandvanilla.com

This spicy hummus is perfect for dipping veggies or tortilla chips. Find recipe here.

4. Potato and Spinach Croquettes

creamy spinach croquettes                               cilantroandcitronella.com

They are crispy and golden brown, but warm and satisfying. Great finger food! Find recipe here.

 

Entrees:

5. Vegan Jackfruit Pozole Rojo

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidaysdorastable.com

Jackfuit replaces the pork in this recipe with great results. Serve with tostadas, radishes, lime juice, and cabbage. Find recipe here.

6. Vegan Pozole Verde

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl       dorastable.com

The green version of pozole is flavored with poblano peppers, tomatillo, and jalapeño. Find the recipe here. 

7. Vegan Menudo

menudo in a clay bowl        mexicanmademeatless.com

What?? It is possible. This recipe uses oyster mushrooms to replace the pancita. Find recipe here.

8. Vegan Bacalao a la Vizcaina

This vegan bacalao a la vizcaína is an adaptation of a Spanish classic, and is served in central and southern Mexico on Christmas Eve.                    dorastable.com

A traditional salt cod dish, remade with mashed chickpeas, olives, tomatoes, potatoes, capers, and red peppers. Find recipe here

9. Espagueti Verde

spaghetti on green poblano sauce in a white bowl      dorastable.com

Spaghetti in a creamy poblano pepper sauce. It’s just the right amount of spicy. Find recipe here.

10. Lasagna

vegan lasagna slice on a white plate                              cilantroandcitronella.com

Lasagna on Christmas?? Yes, even Mexicans eat lasagna. It makes for a good entree. Find the recipe here. 

11. Potato Adobo Tamales

Two vegan tamales on a wooden board, one cut open                                                     dorastable.com

Tamales filled with potatoes in adobo sauce. Serve just out of the steamer. Find recipe here.

12. Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel                             dorastable.com

Jackfruit once again replaces pork in this northern Mexico version of tamales. Find recipe here.

Dessert:

13. Buñuelos

buñuelos on a dark blue platelivingmividaloca.com

Fried dough sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar. For sure a childhood favorite. Find recipe here. 

 

14. Mexican Wedding Cookies (Polvorones)

vegan mexican wedding cookies in a poinsetta box with a ribbon       dorastable.com

Also known as hojarascas. I like them sprinkled with cinnamon sugar, but you can also do powdered sugar. Find recipe here. 

15. Vegan Tequila Truffles

These Vegan Tequila Truffles are rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple. They are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.

Rich an boozy truffles that are great for gifting. Find recipe here.

16. Strawberry Tamales

A pink tamal surrounded by strawberries on a blue plate.                                                         dorastable.com

If you are not familiar with sweet tamales, you have to try these first. Find recipe here.

17. Chocolate Tamales

Making vegan tamales doesn't have to be complicated. With over 50 detailed pictures, this ebook will guide you step-by-step in the tamal making process.                                dorastable.com

Filled with semi-sweet chocolate chips, and pecans. Find recipe here. 

Drinks:

18. Ponche

fruit punch in clay mugs

A hot spiced fruit punch. Served with or without alcohol. Find recipe here.

19. Champurrado

Unlike any hot chocolate you’ve ever had. It is thickened with masa or masa harina. Find recipe here.

20. Atole Almendrado

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.                    dorastable.com

A warm corn based beverage, meant to warm you up this winter. Find recipe here.

21. Vegan Rompope

two glasses of rompope sprinkled with cinnamon                                    kroger.com 

Mexican eggnog. Also a traditional Christmas drink. Find recipe here.

You might know them by a different name like vegan snowball cookies, polvorones, or Russian tea cakes, but there is no doubt that vegan Mexican wedding cookies are THE cookies to make this season. These incredibly “buttery” cookies are studded with chopped pecans, spiced with cinnamon and ground anise, and covered in a delicate layer of powdered sugar.

whipped butter in a glass bowl for vegan mexican wedding cookies

In Mexico, these cookies can be found all year long, but they are especially popular during Christmas. They are not called vegan Mexican wedding cookies, they are known as hojarascas or polvorones depending on where in Mexico you are.

dough for vegan mexican wedding cookies in a large glass bowl

I don’t think I’ve ever seen them actually served at weddings, but you never know, Mexico is a big country were traditions, cuisine, and even accents can differ from state to state. I did grow up eating these, but my favorite is definitely the version with orange zest and cinnamon-sugar.

little balls of cookie dough on a sheet tray ready to bake

We love Christmas! It’s such a joyous time when you live it through the eyes of the children. We are a bilingual and multi-cultural household so we do try to incorporate different traditions from our cultures. The kids get presents (toys) from Santa and the Reyes Magos (Three Kings) bring them books and treats. We eat tamales and pozole, but there’s also turkey (for the non-vegans) and gingerbread house decorating. What are some of your favorite traditions??

a baked cookie in a bowl of powdered sugar

The Recipe: Vegan Mexican Wedding Cookies

This cookie is basically a shortbread cookie, so the first thing you’ll need to do is cream the vegan butter and sugar. After this you add the flour and seasonings and mix well. It is very easy to make and take only 15 min. to bake in the oven!!

vegan mexican wedding cookies in a poinsetta box with a ribbon

  • I used earth balance to make this recipe, but you can use your favorite vegan butter.
  • You can shape these any way you like in little balls or you can use this same dough to roll out and cut into shapes. I’ve even used it to make thumbprint cookies.
  • This recipe makes quite a bit of cookies so if you don’t need that many cookies I suggest you still make the whole recipe then freeze half the dough and save it for later. Instant cookies!!

vegan mexican wedding cookies in a poinsetta box with a ribbon

vegan mexican wedding cookies in a poinsetta box with a ribbon
4 from 2 votes
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Vegan Mexican Wedding Cookies

Vegan Mexican Wedding cookies, this buttery cookie is studded with pecans, spiced with cinnamon and anise, and covered in powdered sugar
Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword mexican wedding cookies, vegan cookies, vegan mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 32 cookies
158 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 5 oz. (2/3 cup) Sugar, granulated
  • 12 oz. (1 ½ cups) Vegan butter, room temperature
  • 16 oz. (3 cups) Flour, all-purpose
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ tsp. Ground anise seed
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 cup Powdered sugar

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Cream butter and sugar, in an electric mixer with the paddle attachment.
  3. Add vanilla, cinnamon, and ground anise. Mix in chopped pecans.
  4. Slowly add flour, with mixer at low speed. Mix until well combined.
  5. Line 2 sheet-pans with parchment paper. Roll dough into 1 inch balls.
  6. Place balls on sheet-tray, 1 inch apart from each other.
  7. Bake for 15 minutes or until bottoms become golden brown.
  8. Remove from oven. Place on a wire rack to cool.
  9. Once completely cool roll cookies in powdered sugar.

Chef's Notes

You can also use this cookie dough recipe to make thumbprint cookies. Dust with cinnamon-sugar instead of powdered sugar for a more hojarascas feel.

This recipe makes quite a bit of cookies so if you don't need that many cookies I suggest you still make the whole recipe then freeze half the dough and save it for later. Instant cookies!!

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Mexican Wedding Cookies
Amount Per Serving
Calories 158 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Fat 9g14%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 100mg4%
Potassium 27mg1%
Carbohydrates 15g5%
Sugar 4g4%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 380IU8%
Calcium 9mg1%
Iron 0.7mg4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.