Sopa seca de fideo is the less well-known cousin of sopa de fideo. While sopa de fideo is a soup, sopa seca de fideo is more of a casserole which happens to be very common in Central Mexico.

fideos toasting in a pot
tomato, garlic, chipotle and onion in blender

I first had sopa seca de fideo when I was a missionary for a year in Mexico City. I was living in a community of consecrated women (kind of like nuns). I remember them saying we were having sopa de fideo for dinner. To my surprise, what came to the table was not the soup of my childhood but a casserole of noodles in a spicy tomato sauce, topped with crema, cheese, and avocado. I was so confused but grew to love this dish, and all that Mexico City has to offer.

fideo noodles cooking in turquoise colored pot

“Sopa seca” means dry soup which is exactly what this dish is. The noodles are toasted lightly and then a puree of tomatoes, chipotle, onion, and garlic is poured on top. It’s just enough liquid for the pasta to absorb the spicy and tangy flavors. This dish, just like sopa de fideo is comfort food, what moms and abuelitas make, but more recently you can find it in restaurants served in tacos!

zucchini added to pot with golden fideos
sopa seca de fideo in a turquoise colored pot

What Noodles Should You Use to Make Sopa de Fideo??

In Mexico we use a small thin pasta that we simply call fideo, which means noodle. It’s similar to angel hair, but it’s cut into one-inch pieces. The most common brand is called La Moderna. If you can’t find it at your local grocery store you can use thin spaghetti and cut it into one-inch pieces with your hands or by placing the pasta in a Ziploc bag and smashing it into smaller pieces.

a vertical shot of sopa seca de fideo on a striped colored towel

The Recipe: Sopa Seca de Fideo

  • I have added zucchini to this recipe for nutritional value, but traditionally it doesn’t usually have zucchini.
  • I used this almond crema, but if you’re looking for a version of crema that is lower in fat you can make a crema with tofu.
a spoon scooping out a portions of sopa seca de fideo
sopa seca de fideo in a bright blue colored plate

Sopa Seca de Fideo

A spicy chipotle tomato noodle casserole. A distant cousin of sopa de fideo
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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: casserole, mexican, vegan
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 331kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. Fideo noodles or thin spaghetti broken into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 can Diced tomatoes
  • 1/2 White onion chopped
  • 2 cloves Garlic peeled
  • 1 Chipotle pepper in adobo
  • 1 tsp. Dry oregano
  • 1 ¼ cups Small diced zucchini
  • 1 ½ cup Vegetable broth

Garnish

Instructions

  • Place the diced tomatoes, chipotle pepper, onion, garlic, and 1 cup of broth and process until smooth. Set aside.
  • Set a large pot to medium heat. Add noodles and dry toast the until golden brown. Add tomato broth and let simmer, stirring constantly, until the tomato broth turns a deep red color about 2 minutes. Add zucchini, oregano, and remaining ½ cup of broth.
  • Turn heat to low, and continue simmering and stirring until the noodles and zucchini are tender, about 10- 12 minutes. Season to taste
  • While the noodles are simmering, make your almond crema.
  • If there is too much liquid in your noodles let them sit for 5 minutes and let the pasta absorb the excess moisture or if there is not enough liquid you can add a
  • Place noodles on a serving dish and drizzle the almond crema on the noodles, sprinkle with chopped cilantro, and sliced of avocado.

Notes

  • I have added zucchini to this recipe for nutritional value, but traditionally it doesn’t usually have zucchini.
  • I used this almond crema, but if you’re looking for a version of crema that is lower in fat you can make a crema with tofu.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 331kcal | Carbohydrates: 56g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 574mg | Potassium: 700mg | Fiber: 7g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 611IU | Vitamin C: 24mg | Calcium: 82mg | Iron: 3mg

Fresas con crema is one of those comfort foods that hold a certain nostalgia and takes you back to hot afternoons and sweet sticky hands. This is the vegan version of fresas con crema and it is just as good or even better than its counterpart!!

almonds in blender with almond milk

History of Fresas con Crema

Fresas con crema or Mexican strawberries and cream is an iconic Mexican dish, a childhood favorite. To my surprise, while doing research on this recipe I found out that fresas con crema aren’t Mexican at all. They are based on an English dish, strawberries and cream.

sweet almond crema in a white container with a pink background

Strawberries and cream is apparently super popular in England. It is believed that King George V was the first to bring strawberries and cream to Wimbleton in the early 1900’s. Strawberries are in season in the summer in England and it’s an easy and refreshing dessert that everyone loves to make.

sweet almond crema being poured on top of strawberries in a mason jar

Strawberries in Mexico

This dessert is especially popular in the Mexican states that grow strawberries like Guanajuato, Michoacan, Zacatecas, Queretaro, and Aguascalientes. Did you know that most of the strawberries grown in Mexico are exported to the United States? I didn’t know. The varieties most commonly grown in Mexico are Festival, Sweet Charlie, Galexia, Camino Real, Albion, Camarosa, Aromas, Ventana, Diamante, Pajaro, Parker, Chandler, and Gaviota.

glass cup filled with fresas con crema with a gold colored spoon digging in on a pink background

The Mexican Version

Mexican Fresas con crema is made with Mexican crema which is different from heavy or whipping cream. It’s slightly tangy and thicker than heavy cream, but not as thick as sour cream. For this vegan version, I made the crema using almonds that I soaked overnight and peeled, then blended with almond milk, lemon juice, vanilla, and agave syrup. Some of you may be familiar with this technique since I’ve used it before to make the sauce for this creamy chipotle pasta, and this poblano pasta as well.

a close up of a glass cup filled with fresas con crema with a gold spoon taking out a spoonful

The Recipe: Vegan Fresas con Crema

  • Make sure to soak your almonds overnight. For a smoother sauce you can soak them for 2 days, just make sure to change the water.
  • You can use cashews instead of almonds for this recipe. If you do, make sure you add the liquid gradually until you reach the desired consistency.
a lovely little girl in a multi-colored dress eating fresas con crema
two glass cups filled with fresas con crema on a pink background surrounded by strawberries

Vegan Fresas con Crema

These Fresas con Crema are sweet, tangy, delicious, and completely vegan!
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, strawberries and cream,, vegan crema
Prep Time: 30 minutes
1 day
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Sweet Crema:

  • 1 cup Almonds, soaked overnight, peeled
  • ½ cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • ¼ cup Agave syrup
  • 1/3-1/2 cup Water
  • 1 lb. Strawberries, hulled and cut into quarters

Instructions

  • To make the almond crema pour boiling water over almonds and let them soak overnight. The next day peel the almonds. Place an almond between your thumb and your forefinger and press slightly. The skin should slip right off.
  • Place almond in a blender with almond milk, vanilla, lemon juice, agave, and 1/3 cup of water.
  • Process until smooth on high. This is going to take 3-4 minutes. If necessary add the remaining amount of water until you reach the desired consistency. About the same as a thick heavy cream.
  • Strain the almond mixture with a fine-mesh strainer. Place in the fridge for at least thirty minutes.
  • Serve over cut strawberries.

Notes

• Make sure to soak your almonds overnight. For a smoother sauce you can soak them for 2 days, just make sure to change the water.
• You can use cashews instead of almonds for this recipe. If you do, make sure you add the liquid gradually until you reach the desired consistency.

Is plant based Mexican food an oxymoron?? I used to think so. Enchiladas without cheese, pozole without pork or tamales without chicken? It sounded frankly awful to me, and it seemed to daunting to give up my childhood favorites. Well it doesn’t have to be that way. Plant based Mexican food is delicious and good for you!!

Vegan vs Plant Based?

Vegan means that you avoid all animal products in your food, but also in everyday items such as clothes and shampoo. Most of the time people become vegan for ethical reasons (to end animal suffering), it’s not just a diet. Plant based or whole food plant based (WFPB) is talking specifically about diet. A diet free of animal products, processed food, and oil. Usually, people choose this lifestyle for its health benefits.

This blog has been vegan Mexican for 5 yrs. now and during that time I have gone back in forth between vegan and plant-based in my recipes. (I just can’t seem to give up chips!!) So you will find oil-free recipes, and recipes so deliciously full of fat and chips, lots of chips.

I know everyone has a different path, so that’s why I’ve compiled all of the whole food plant based recipes on my blog for you. All of these recipes are oil-free or easily adaptable to be, and are low in sugar or the sugar can easily be substituted for a low-glycemic sweeteners. Enjoy!

Tofu avocado scramble on a blue plate with a cup of coffee beside it

Breakfast:

Hearts of palm ceviche on a blue plate with chips, and a beer.

Salads and Appetizers:

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Soups:

The perfect vegan Mexican brown rice, made with a very traditional recipe. It has just the right texture and balance of tomato-garlic flavor.

Sides:

side angle of vegan picadillo and mexican rice in a clay plate on top of a striped blue placemat

Main Course:

A close up of vegan arroz con leche with raisins with the spoon digging in.

Dessert:

Salsas:

Enjoy this refreshing agua de melon, which is easy to prepare, delicious and the prefect treat for a super hot day.

Drinks:

Agua de Melon

Licuado de Plátano

Resources:

If you are looking for more plant based Mexican food I recommend the following bloggers.

Piloncillo y Vainilla

Mexican Made Meatless

Brand New Vegan

Thyme and Love

One of my all-time favorite breakfasts are these vegan chilaquiles rojos! Crispy strips of corn tortilla are coated in a guajillo-tomato salsa, tossed with a mixture of vegetables, and sprinkled with vegan queso cotija, and almond crema.

guajillo chile sauce blended for chilaquiles

When I first decided to go vegan, I found breakfast to be one of the hardest things. Believe me, you get tired of oatmeal pretty fast, and sometimes you just want something hearty and savory. In the beginning, I was too scared to try a tofu scramble, but I love them now.  That’s where easy vegan chilaquiles come in. They are crunchy, spicy, and just the right amount of creamy.

a strainer set over a pot with a ladle pushing the sauce through

What are chilaquiles??

Chilaquiles are a Mexican dish served for breakfast and sometimes dinner. It consists of fried tortillas strips, a salsa, crema, and cheese. They can be red, green, or even made with mole. To make breakfast chilaquiles, you can they can serve them with a tofu scramble, and if you’re going to have them for dinner you can add a chicken substitute. 

tortilla chips coated in guajilllo chile sauce in a turquoise pot

For this vegan version, I’ve used an almond crema to off-set the heat in the dish. Why an almond crema? I’m going to tell you a little secret. I don’t like cashew cream, gasp! I know, I’m a pretty bad vegan, but it’s just too sweet for me. I don’t think it goes very well with Mexican food, that’s why I’ve come up with my own version of crema. I also make my own vegan cotija cheese but it is not really essential to the dish if you want to omit it.

vertical photo of vegan chilaquiles in a pink bowl drizzled with almond crema on a blue and white towel

The Recipe: Vegan Chilaquiles Rojos

  • For a healthier version bake your tortilla triangles at 350F for 30 min.
  • You can buy pre-made enchilada sauce to make a quick version of this. 
  • You can add any veggies you like, I simply added my favorites.
  • Place your chilaquiles in a casserole dish and top with vegan melty cheese to make this an easy breakfast casserole. 
a fork taking a piece of the vegan chilaquiles in a pink bowl
vegan chilaquiles rojos in a pink bowl over a white towel with blue stripes with avocado fan on top

Vegan Chilaquiles Rojos

5 from 1 vote
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chile guajillo, red chilaquiles, vegan cotija, vegetarian
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 444kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Vegetable Sauté

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil
  • 2 Zucchini, diced
  • ½ hd. Broccoli florets
  • 2 Tomatoes, diced
  • 2 Garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup Vegetable broth or water
  • ½ cup Black beans, canned or home-made
  • 1 cup Spinach, chopped

Sauce

  • 4 Chile guajillo, devained and seeded
  • 2 cans (14.5 oz) Diced tomatoes
  • 1 Onion, white, chopped
  • 4 Garlic, cloves
  • 1-2 Arbol chiles,
  • 24 Corn tortillas, cut into triangles, 12ths
  • 1 cup Vegetable oil

Garnish

Instructions

  • Vegetable Saute: Heat 1 tbsp. of oil (optional) in a large sauté pan to medium-high heat. Once oil is hot, add zucchini and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often. Add the tomato, and garlic, and let cook for 1 minute more. Add broccoli and ¼ cup of water and cover. Lower heat to medium and cook for 1-2 minutes or until broccoli starts to get tender. Add black beans and spinach. Stir. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  • Sauce: Boil water in a small pot. Place the dried guajillo and arbol chiles in the water and simmer for 5 min. Drain and place in the blender with the tomato, onion, and garlic. Blend until smooth. Strain. Pour finished sauce into a large pot and simmer for 5 min. Set aside.
  • Pour vegetable oil into a heavy-bottomed pot , enough to cover about 2 inches of the bottom. Heat to about 350F at medium-high heat. Fry the tortilla triangles in batches until golden brown. Place the fried tortillas on a paper towel lined tray and let cool.
  • Assemble: Toss the tortilla chips with the tomato sauce in the large pot where it was simmered. The tortillas will begin to soften, but we don’t want them completely soft, so plate the tortillas and sauce immediately. Top with ½ cup of the veggie mixture, chopped cilantro, avocado slices, drizzle with the crema, and sprinkle with vegan cotija.

Notes

For a healthier version bake the tortilla chips in the oven at 350F for 30 min. or until crispy and golden brown.
  • You can buy pre-made enchilada sauce to make a quick version of this. 
  • You can add any veggies you like, I simply added my favorites.
  • Place your chilaquiles in a casserole dish and top with vegan melty cheese to make this an easy breakfast casserole. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 444kcal | Carbohydrates: 61g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Sodium: 103mg | Potassium: 781mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 1696IU | Vitamin C: 25mg | Calcium: 121mg | Iron: 2mg

Picadillo is one of those dishes that is a staple in every Mexican household. This vegan picadillo made with lentils is super easy to make and kids tend to love it. It was one of my favorites growing up. In northern Mexico, it is traditionally made with ground beef, onions, garlic, chiles, and potatoes. In southern and central Mexico they add raisins, olives, and even fruit. You can also find picadillo in other Latin American countries. Perhaps the most famous is the Cuban version, which consists of ground or shredded beef, onions, peppers, potatoes, olives, and capers.

stainless steel pot full of lentils, onions, and broth on a wood background
tomato chipotle puree in a blender container over a wood background

Honestly, I was a little doubtful if this recipe would work with the lentils, but it works! As I was making it I could smell all the flavors coming together. My husband walked into the kitchen and got all excited, ” You’re making picadillo!” That is until I told him it was vegan and made with lentils. He hates lentils for some reason.

cooked lentils being mashed by a fork in a red bowl
cooked onions and lentils in a cast iron enameled pot with a wooden spoon
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This post was created in partnership with Valley Fig Growers. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Mole is one of those traditional dishes that is passed down from generation to generation. It is a labor of love ground down on a metate and savored by the whole family.  This fig mole uses the earthiness and sweetness of Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Dried Figs to enhance the complexity and richness of the mole. Golden brown sautéed mushrooms are bathed in fig mole and served on warm homemade corn tortillas, topped with sliced red onion, and cilantro. 

dried chiles, corn tortilla, chocolate, tomatoes, tomatillo, peanuts, almonds, bolillo, and pumpkin seeds ingredients to make fig mole on a white wood background

The word mole comes from the nahuatl word “mulli” meaning sauce or stew. There are many varieties of mole: red, green, yellow, poblano, negro, and many more. They vary according to the region of Mexico you are in.

anise seeds, clove, and cinnamon toasting on a cast iron pan

Mole’s origins are pre-Hispanic. It is well known that the indigenous people of Mexico prepared complex sauces ground on their metate. Over the years and after the conquest, additional elements were added to these sauces that were not available before, like lard and bread.

peanuts, almonds, roasted tomates, roasted tomatillos, toasted bread, toasted tortillas and fried figs in a white saute pan with red handle

Why Dried Figs??
Well, to start off with I love figs, fresh and dried. There are many moles that use raisins or prunes to add sweetness to the sauce, so using dried figs instead gives this sauce a natural sweetness that pairs amazingly with the chocolate and nuts already in the sauce.

fig mole in an aqua colored cast iron pot with a wooden soon stirring the mole

California Figs

California supplies 100% of the nation’s dried figs.  They were introduced by the  Spaniards in the early 16th century. The priests at Mission San Diego were the ones who originally planted the figs, this is how the dark purple fig became known as “Mission.” For this recipe I used Orchard Choice California Mission Dried Figs.

aqua colored cast iron pan with mushrooms in fig mole

I love recreating and innovating traditional Mexican dishes to fit the vegan lifestyle. Mole is usually served with some kind of animal product, but I chose instead to use mushrooms to make these delicious tacos. The umami flavor and “meatiness “ of the mushrooms are the perfect way to honor the beautiful tradition of mole making that continues to be passed on from generation to generation.

fig mole mushroom tacos on wooden board with an embroidered Otomi placemat and orchard choice fig pack

The Recipe: Fig Mole Mushroom Tacos

  • You can find the dried chiles: mulato, pasilla, and ancho at your local Mexican market, or you can find them HERE.
  • I used Orchard Choice California Mission Dried Figs for this recipe.
  • You can pair these fig mole mushroom tacos with a marzen style ale.
  • I used a combination of cremini and portabella mushrooms, but I recommend the addition of oyster and maitake mushrooms.
  • This recipe makes about 1 quart and 1 cup of fig mole. You will only need about two cups of it for this recipe. You can freeze the rest for up to six months. 
close up of a hand taking a fig mole mushroom tacos on a wooden board with sliced figs and cilantro in the background
fig mole mushroom tacos on wooden board laid out at an angle with an embroidered Otomi placemat and orchard choice fig pack

Fig Mole Mushroom Tacos

This fig mole uses the earthiness and sweetness of Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Dried Figs to enhance the complexity and richness of the mole. Golden brown sautéed mushrooms are bathed in fig mole and served on warm homemade corn tortillas, topped with sliced red onion, and cilantro. 
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chocolate, fig, mole and mushrooms
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 1018kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Fig Mole:

  • 4 Dried chile mulato seeded, de-stemmed
  • 5 Dried chile pasilla seeded de-stemmed
  • 6 Dried chile ancho seeded de-stemmed
  • ¼ tsp. Anise seed
  • 3 Whole cloves
  • 10 Black peppercorns
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick, 1 inch long
  • 1/3 cup Sesame seeds
  • 3 Plum tomatoes
  • 1 Tomatillo
  • 5 cloves Garlic, unpeeled
  • ½ cup Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 1 cup Orchard Choice California Mission Dried Figs
  • 1/3 cup Raw almonds
  • 1/3 cup Pepitas
  • ¾ cup Peanuts
  • 1 Stale corn tortilla
  • 1 Stale Bolillo (or 1 ½ cups stale baguette)
  • 1 tablet Mexican chocolate
  • 5 cups Vegetable stock

Tacos:

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 1 ½ lb. Assorted mushrooms, sliced (shiitakes, portabellas, oyster, maitake)
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 1 Red onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup Chopped cilantro

Instructions

To make the fig mole:

  • Heat a large cast-iron pan to medium-high heat, add chiles to the pan and toast lightly, about 3-4 seconds on each side. Remove from the pan and place in a medium bowl. Cover with boiling hot water and soak for 30 min.
  • In the same cast iron pan set to low-medium heat, toast the anise seed, peppercorns, cloves, and cinnamon for 1-2 minutes until they begin to release their aromas. Set aside.
  • Use the same pan to toast the sesame seeds for 1-2 minutes, until golden brown and set aside. Use a spice grinder or food processor and grind all the toasted spices as fine as possible. Set aside.
  • Set your cast iron pan to medium-high heat and place the tomatoes, tomatillo, and garlic on the pan until they become soft and slightly blackened, about 7-10 minutes, Set aside.
  • Set a large sauté pan to medium heat and add oil. Fry the following ingredients separately: Orchard Choice California Mission Dried Figs until plump and golden brown, the almonds until slightly toasted, the pumpkin seeds until they pop and turn a golden yellow color, the peanuts until toasted and golden brown, the tortilla until crispy and black in certain spots, and the bread toasted a deep golden brown. Set aside.
  • Place the soaked and drained dried chiles in the blender with 1 cup of the chile soaking liquid, and the ground up spices, bread, and tortilla. Process until smooth. Add vegetable stock if necessary. Pour into a large bowl.
  • Now place the rest of the fried ingredients with the tomato, tomatillo, and peeled garlic. Add vegetable stock if necessary and process until smooth. Pour into bowl with chile mixture. Strain mixture.
  • Heat a large pot to low-medium heat and pour the mixture into the pot. Bring mixture to a simmer, add 3 cups of vegetable stock, and stir. Add a Mexican chocolate tablet and simmer slowly for 30 minutes. Stir continuously to avoid the mole sticking to the bottom of the pot. Season with salt and pepper. If the sauce is too thick, add the remaining 2 cups of vegetable stock.

To make the tacos:

  • Heat a large sauté pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tbsp. of oil. Sauté mushrooms until golden brown. Pour 2 cups of the finished mole sauce on top and stir to combine.
  • Heat corn tortillas on a comal or griddle. Place 2 tbsp. of mushroom filling on each tortilla and top with chopped cilantro and sliced red onion. Enjoy!!

Notes

This recipe makes about 1 quart and 1 cup of fig mole. You will only need about two cups of it for this recipe. You can freeze the rest for up to six months.

Nutrition

Serving: 4servings | Calories: 1018kcal | Carbohydrates: 103g | Protein: 25g | Fat: 64g | Saturated Fat: 30g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 1471mg | Potassium: 1653mg | Fiber: 22g | Sugar: 32g | Vitamin A: 2026IU | Vitamin C: 18mg | Calcium: 341mg | Iron: 7mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes, and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce. The combination of chile ancho, chile guajillo, oregano, a pinch of cumin, and garlic add a smoky and savory flavor to the stew. This post is also available in Español.

This dish is inspired by a very northern dish called guisado de puerco in chile colorado. I have of course left out the pork and used a combination of potatoes and chickpeas. It is best served with rice and warm tortillas.

Chile guajillo and chile ancho on a dark wooden surface

I know working with dried chiles can be intimidating at first, but it is quite easy. All you have to do is remove the stems and take out the seeds. They can be lightly toasted to bring out the smoky flavor of the chiles, but it is not necessary to do so.

Dried chile sauce being poured over sweet potato and chickpea stew.

To use them you have to first reconstitute them in hot water. Simply drop the deseeded chiles in nearly boiling water and let them sit for about 10 minutes or until they are soft and pliable. They can be found in your local Hispanic market or now most grocery stores carry them in their Hispanic sections.

Over head shot of sweet potato and chickpea stew with white rice on a Mexican clay plate

I know a lot of new vegans will look at this and think that potatoes and chickpeas are not a substitute for pork, and you know what, they’re right. There are some recipes where I try to mimic the texture and flavor of meat, but there are others that I use vegetables to replace the animal protein.

My goal here is to recreate the flavors, spices, and aromas of traditional Mexican dishes and bring back all of those memories from my childhood and my family’s cooking. I encourage you to try a lot of different options to substitute meat in your dishes. With time you’ll find what works best for you!

The Recipe: Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower or tofu would also be a great addition to this dish.

Sweet potato and chickpea stew in a clay Mexican pot on top of a red and white striped napkin. Rice in the background
Close up of Sweet potato and chickpea stew in a clay Mexican pot on top of a red and white striped napkin with a wooden spoon showing a bite. Rice in the background

Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

This sweet potato and chickpea stew with a Mexican twist is made with guajillo and ancho chile, cumin, oregano, and thyme.
5 from 2 votes
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chile colorado, guisado, pork substitute
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 278kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 Ancho chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 4 Guajillo chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 1 Tomato, medium
  • 5 cloves Garlic
  • 1 tsp. Oregano, dried
  • 1 Bay leaf, dried
  • 1/2 tsp. Cumin, ground
  • 1 cup Onion, white, minced
  • 1 ½ cups (1 large) Diced Sweet Potato
  • 1 cup (1 medium) Diced Yukon gold potato
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Chickpeas, drained
  • 2 Thyme sprigs
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Instructions

  • Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add chiles, tomato and bay leaf and turn heat down to a reallt slow simmer. Let simmer for 8 minutes.
  • While the chiles are simmering, heat a large pot to medium heat and add ¼ cup of water. Add onion and sweat until tender and translucent, about 4 minutes.
  • Add potatoes and sweet potatoes and 1 cup of vegetable stock. Cover and let simmer for about 6 min or until potatoes are beginning to become tender, but are not fully cooked.
  • Strain the chiles, but reserve one cup of the chile soaking liquid. Place the drained chiles, garlic, tomato, oregano, cumin, and 1 cup of the chile soaking liquid in the blender and blend until smooth. Strain the sauce.
  • Add sauce, chickpeas, and sprigs of thyme to the pot. Let simmer slowly for 8-10 minutes or until the sweet potatoes are cooked through. If the sauce is too thick, add more vegetable stock accordingly.
  • Season with salt and pepper. Remove thyme sprigs before serving.
  • Serve with rice and warm corn tortillas.

Notes

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower or tofu would also be a great addition to this dish.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 278kcal | Carbohydrates: 62g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 326mg | Potassium: 1368mg | Fiber: 16g | Sugar: 22g | Vitamin A: 22955IU | Vitamin C: 31mg | Calcium: 91mg | Iron: 4mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

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These vegan sopes or sopes de nogada are topped with a walnut “meat”, refried mayocoba beans, tomatillo avocado salsa, queso fresco, and cilantro. They are meant to be eaten with your hands so you can bask in the glorious messiness of eating yet another variation of Mexico’s love affair with corn.

4 pictures, picture to the top left has ground walnuts in a food processor, top right ingredients in blender for marinade, bottom left redish pureed marinade over walnuts in a glass bowl, bottom left everything mixed together in glass bowl with spatula
red colored walnut meat on a cast iron pan with teal handle

La Vida Verde

This recipe is from the book La Vida Verde by Jocelyn Ramirez. Jocelyn is the founder of Todo Verde a plant-based Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles. She is a former college professor who found the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle when her father was diagnosed with cancer a second time.

vida verde cookbook cover two jackfruit tacos with cilantro and red onion on a a green clay plate with flowers

This book is an amazing tribute to her family, culture, and traditions. With recipes like Mole Verde con Champiñones, Tamale Negro con Yaca, and Queso Quesadilla this book brings into the plant-based world authentic vegan Mexican recipes for the whole family. Honestly, this book is incredibly well written, and I am so happy to be sharing with you the work of another woman of color who is supporting and championing the community she came from. The book is available on pre-order now!

4 pictures, top left masa harina and water in metal bowl, top right ball of dough in metal bowl, bottom left open hand palm up with ball of dough, bottom right two hands pressing ball of dough into a pattie shape

What are sopes??

Sopes are a sort of thick small tortilla with a border along the edges. It is made out of masa harina or nixtamalized corn. Traditionally it is served with beans, cheese, lettuce and the main filling, but they can also have potatoes, radishes, and pickled jalapeños. In different regions of Mexico, they are also known as memelas, pellizcadas or picadas and they shape can vary from round to oval.

two sopes cooking on a cast iron pan with a black marble background
two sopes on a white plate and a a hand pinching the edhes

How to make Sopes?

The easiest way to make sopes at home is with masa harina. I recently found one that is organic called Masabrosa! The ratio of water to masa harina is going to vary according to where you live and whether it is humid outside. The important thing to know is your prepared masa should be the texture of soft playdough, and you should be able to roll a small ball of dough without any cracks in it.

3 vegan sopes filled with beans, walnut meat, avocado salsa on a colorful talavera plate and yellow napkin underneath

The Recipe: Walnut and Bean Vegan Sopes

  • You can use the walnut seasoning to flavor tofu or TVP of you have an allergy to nuts
  • If you are looking for a crispier texture on the sopes you can fry them after having pinched the edges.
  • Be careful not to add too much liquid to your walnut seasoning or you will end up with a soupy concoction instead of a meaty texture.
  • Use canned refried beans and premade salsa for a super-fast version of this recipe
3 sopes filled with beans, walnut meat, avocado salsa on a colorful talavera plate
a sope filled with refried beans topped with walnut meat, cheese and avocado salsa with a bite taken out of it on a talavera plate
a close up 3 vegan sopes filled with beans, walnut meat, avocado salsa on a colorful talavera plate and yellow napkin underneath

Walnut and Bean Vegan Sopes

These vegan sopes or sopes de nogada are topped with a walnut “meat”, refried mayocoba beans, tomatillo avocado salsa, queso fresco, and cilantro. Reprinted with permission from La Vida Verde by Jocelyn Ramirez, Page Street Publishing Co. 2019.
4 from 2 votes
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Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: antojitos, avocado salsa, queso fresco vegan, walnut meat
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 1413kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

For the Walnut Meat

  • 3 cups Raw walnuts
  • 1/2 cup Sun-dried tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp. Liquid aminos or soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. Raw sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Cumin
  • 1 tbsp. Paprika
  • 1 tsp. Crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp. Nutritional yeast
  • 3 cloves Garlic, peeled
  • 1/2 cup Cooking oil, plus 2 tbsp
  • Salt, to taste

For the Beans

  • 1/4 cup Cooking oil
  • 3 cups Cooked mayocoba beans, strained
  • 1/2 tsp. Crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup Vegetable broth
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

For the Sopes

  • 3 cups Prepared masa harina (about 2 cups masa harina and 2 cups hot water)

Avocado Salsa

  • 3 Tomatillos, large, fire roasted
  • 1 Jalapeño, destemmed (deseeded if too spicy), fire roasted
  • 1-2 tbsp. Lemon juice
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1/2 Medium Hass avocado
  • 1/4 bunch Cilantro
  • Salt, to taste

For Serving

Instructions

  • To make the walnut meat, use a food processor to break down the walnuts to small pieces similar to the size of ground beef pieces. If you don’t have a food processor, you can use a blender and blend the walnuts
1 cup (120 g) at a time. Add the ground walnuts to a bowl and set aside.
  • Place the sun-dried tomatoes in a bowl of warm water for 10 minutes, or until rehydrated. In the blender, place the rehydrated sun-dried tomatoes (reserve the hydrating water), liquid aminos, sugar, cumin, paprika, red pepper flakes, nutritional yeast, garlic, 1⁄2 cup (120 ml) of the oil, 1⁄2 cup (120 ml) of the water used to rehydrate the sun-dried tomatoes and salt. Blend until completely smooth and add the mixture to the bowl of ground walnuts. Mix until the walnuts are fully incorporated.
  • Coat the bottom of a sauté pan with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of oil, and preheat over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the walnut mixture to the pan. Sauté for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the mixture slightly darkens, the walnut pieces soften and the flavors meld together. Taste for seasoning, adding more as needed. Set the walnut meat aside.
  • To make the beans, coat the bottom of a medium pot with the oil. Preheat the oil over medium heat and add the mayocoba beans, crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, bay leaf, vegetable broth, salt and pepper. Allow the beans to simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaf, and use a bean smasher or hand-held emulsifier to smash the beans into a rough and slightly runny paste. Taste for seasoning, and add more as needed.
  • To make the sopes, preheat a comal or griddle over medium heat. Divide the masa into 1⁄4-cup (65-g) balls. You should have 12 balls. Use your hands to press the masa into thick 4-inch (10-cm) round disks, using your fingers to gently press any cracked edges. These will be thicker than tortillas and will take slightly longer to cook. Place each sope on the comal to cook for about 2 minutes. When the first side sears and the edges start to slightly dry, flip it over to the second side and cook for 2 more minutes. Flip the sope again and remove to a plate to slightly cool. Once each sope is cool enough to handle, use your fingers to pinch the edges, forming a rim around the edge of each sope. Put them back on the comal to heat through.
  • To make the avocado salsa, add the tomatillos, jalapeño, lemon juice, cumin, avocado, cilantro and salt to a blender. Blend until smooth. Taste for lemon juice and salt, and add more as needed.
  • To serve, add a layer of mayocoba beans to the bottom of each sope. It should be enough to fill the rim of the sope. Add the walnut meat over the beans, and top it with the salsa. Garnish with Queso Añejo and cilantro.

Notes

  • You can use the walnut seasoning to flavor tofu or TVP of you have an allergy to nuts
  • If you are looking for a crispier texture on the sopes you can fry them after having pinched the edges.
  • Be careful not to add too much liquid to your walnut seasoning or you will end up with a soupy concoction instead of a meaty texture.
  • Use canned refried beans and premade salsa for a super-fast version of this recipe

Nutrition

Serving: 4sopes | Calories: 1413kcal | Carbohydrates: 101g | Protein: 34g | Fat: 105g | Saturated Fat: 11g | Sodium: 741mg | Potassium: 1803mg | Fiber: 26g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin A: 2892IU | Vitamin C: 19mg | Calcium: 253mg | Iron: 14mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.