Molletes (Toasted Bean and Avocado Open-Faced Sandwiches)

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Summer is creeping along, and we’ve exhausted our list of things to do. Bluffton is a small town and Hilton Head is a tourist trap right now. I briefly considered going home to Mexico for the rest of the summer, but the plane tickets are crazy expensive.

One if the things I’m really enjoying right now is cooking with the munchkin. He helps out with peeling vegetables, grating cheese, mixing, tossing and stirring. We are focusing on reading recipes, following directions, and cleaning. So far our favorite recipes are chocolate cupcakes, carrot cake pancakes and alphabet soup. It’s easier to involve him in baking, and it keeps him away from the stove. I really like that he’s proud of our creations. The other day we had our neighbor over to play and he said, ” Do you want to try my famous alphabet soup?” Things can get a bit messy, but what’s life without a little mess to it.

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This recipe is a good one for the kids. It was one of my favorite dishes as a child, of course not the vegan version I’m sharing with you now, but the ones slathered in cheese. Oh cheese, melty, fatty, wonderful cheese! The avocado in this recipe makes up for the lack of cheese though. Last week I tried making an almond cheese and the result was unfortunate. It looked like cheese, smelled like cheese, but it definitely was not cheese. I think I’ll just stick to nut sauces from now on. Enjoy!

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Molletes (Toasted Bean and Avocado Open-Faced Sandwiches)

 Yield: 4 portions

Time: 15 min

Ingredients:

Bolillos, whole wheat, 3 ea.
Refried Beans 1 ½ cups
Avocado, pitted, sliced 2 ea.
Salsa, homemade 1 ½ cups

 Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 350F

2. Cut bolillos in half and place them on a sheet tray.

3. Toast in oven, face up, for 3 to 4 min or until golden brown on top.,

4. Remove from oven and spread warm beans on each half.

5. Top with avocado and homemade salsa.

6. Serve immediately.

Chef’s Notes:

Bolillos are easily found now in the bread department of local grocery stores, if you cannot find them whole wheat French bread will work as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexican Garbanzo Salad

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It is hot! Here in SC it is not only hot, but 100% humid. I’m finally back to posting recipes and this one is great for a hot summer day. Even though this is a Mexican salad, I think you should make it for your 4th of July party. It is refreshing, delicious and perfect with those ripe tomatoes you are growing in your garden. Ok, so maybe not all of us are growing tomatoes, but I’m sure you can get some good ones at your local farmers market.

Everything here at home is running as smooth as it can with a 4 yr. old and a 3 month old. We are cooling off at the pool and enjoying sleeping in longer than usual and going to bed later. Some days are better than others, but generally we are pretty content. Even though I complain about the heat, I am enjoying the slow pace of summer. Have a great weekend!

Mexican Garbanzo Salad

 Yield: 4 portions

Time: 15 min.

Ingredients:

Tomato, diced 3 cups
Onion, white ½ cup
Jalapeño, minced 2 tbsp.
Chickpeas, canned, drained 1 cup
Avocado, diced 1 cup
Cilantro, chopped ¼ cup
Lime juice, fresh To taste
Sallt, kosher To taste
Black Pepper, ground To taste

Preparation:

Combine all ingredients and season to taste.

Chef’s Notes:

Serve with baked corn chips.

 

 

 

The Rising: A novel

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With baby girl being only two months old I have not had time to do much, other than breastfeed and try to keep our 4 yr. old from destroying the house. I have, however, had time to read a lot! I recently read a book that I have to tell you about. It’s called The Rising: A Novel  by Robert Ovies. What does this have to do with food? Nothing, absolutely, nothing.

This is the story of 9 yr. old CJ who has the power to heal and rise people from the dead, his dedicated single mom Lynn, his self-involved father Joe, and their family friend Father Mark. As soon as the family discovers CJ’s power they must face many challenges, and between trying to keep him safe, his dad trying to profit from the situation, and Fr. Mark who cannot seem to grasp what is going on, CJ’s future seems uncertain.

Throughout the book you will find yourself wondering whether you believe in miracles or could believe in them. I don’t want to give too much of the story away, but I will tell you that this book is a thriller, but also a love story that will evoke powerful feelings about being a parent and what we are willing to do for our children.

This is definitely a good read. If you’re interested you can find this book on Amazon. Hopefully my next post will be something other than a book review, but for now, I have to go back to feeding my little one:)

Letting Others Cook for You

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My mom cooking away.

My mom cooking away.

It has been a pretty rough month for us. I spent a total of 12 days in the hospital, and our baby girl was in the NICU for 14 days. We are finally home and enjoying the sleepless nights and the inevitable routine that comes with having a newborn. Yes, we’re actually enjoying it! After watching our tiny baby being poked, prodded, and stuck in an incubator for two weeks, her cries are as sweet as honey.

Baby girl

Baby girl

My mom flew in from Mexico to help out and she has graciously been taking care of all of our meals and other household duties. After almost 2 weeks of hospital food I welcomed my mom’s cooking with open arms. There’s only one problem, my mom is a little out of practice when it comes to cooking. She did cook for us when we were little, but once my dad opened the restaurant there was no longer a need to cook at home, growing up we ate most of our meals there.

I find that a lot of people are intimidated when they find themselves cooking for two food professionals, but honestly, you shouldn’t be. Do we have high standards when it comes to food? Of course we do, but all of us food professionals have something in common, we love to eat. This means we love to eat anything and everything, or we’ll try it at least once. Also, most of us have some manners and won’t really tell you your food sucks, unless you ask for our honest opinion, which would then sound something like this: ” The chicken was slightly over cooked, I like my rice with a bit more salt, and I prefer vegetables on the crunchy side.”

Chicken soup

Chicken soup

Sometmes in can be hard to let others cook for you. because it means giving up control. It means that the carrots won’t be cut into perfect small dice, and the beef won’t be cooked exactly the way you like it. However, I think that we, more than most, know first hand all the work that goes into cooking and are able to recognize and appreciate a good meal when we taste one. That’s why I am so grateful for my mom and her cooking. Even though she might be a little rusty in the cooking department, the love and care she is putting into our meals is something not easily replicated, even if it’s something as simple and comforting as chicken soup.

Making Hospital Food Look Good

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Cobb salad, chicken noodle soup and wheat roll.

Cobb salad, chicken noodle soup and wheat roll.

This is my 6th day in the hospital. My water broke on Monday and I’m stuck here until this little one is born. It was a bit scary at first, but now we’ve kind of settled into a hospital routine. I miss my family terribly, but I’m trying to keep busy.

Steel cut oats, fresh fruit, and yogurt parfait.

Steel cut oats, fresh fruit, and yogurt parfait.

Can we talk about hospital food please? I have to say the food here is not that bad, but the options are limited and a lot of it is processed food, canned peaches, boxed mashed potatoes, and stuff like that. It’s funny how it takes something like this to happen so you can appreciate the things you have at home. I don’t cook fancy or complicated meals all the time, but almost everything is done from scratch, and boy does that make a difference!

Strip steak, peppers & onions, green beans, and baked potato.

Strip steak, peppers & onions, green beans, and baked potato.

Since I have all this time on my hands I’ve resolved to make hospital food look good. It’s amazing what a little food styling and editing can do! Hopefully we’ll be out of here soon with a healthy baby girl and a renewed motivation for cooking good, healthy, and fresh food for our family. Please keep us in your thoughts and prayers.

Buttermilk Spoonbread

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One of the best things about moving around so much is all the people you meet. We have friends all over the country now, and that’s pretty cool if you ask me. Of course the goodbyes never get easier, no matter how often they happen.

Heat buttermilk and add cornmeal.

Heat buttermilk and add cornmeal.

Add butter and let cool.

Add butter and let cool.

Add egg yolks.

Add egg yolks.

I got this recipe from a new friend, Mary Neville. Mary has been living with celiac disease for over 40 yrs. This however has not stopped her from living her life for one bit. In fact, I would say it has motivated her to raise awareness, raise money for research, be a volunteer tester for new gluten-free products, counseling newly diagnosed patients and families, and working with a local supermarket chain dietician to offer monthly gluten-free baking and cooking seminars.

Mary Neville

Mary Neville

Add whipped egg whites.

Add whipped egg whites.

Fold in.

Fold in.

Pour into ramekins.

Pour into ramekins.

She was gluten-free way before there were gluten-free items on grocery shelves. This means that she had to learn to create her own products using rice flour from the Asian Center, grow her own organic vegetables, and take cooking classes to adapt traditional recipes to be gluten-free. If there was one thing you should now about Mary is that she has a true passion for raising awareness about celiac disease. It is because of people like her that there are now so many gluten-free products available and that many people are diagnosed early on in their lives. Thank you Mary for sharing this recipe with us.

Mary invited us over and we had a mini gluten free feast.

Mary invited us over and we had a mini gluten free feast.

Spoonbread is a traditional southern dish. I have to admit that I had never had spoonbread before, but I was enchanted by it. It has all the wonderful taste of a proper cornmeal based bread, but without the downside of a dry overcooked cornbread. It is exactly what it sounds like, a bread you eat with a spoon, but I would say it is more like a soufflé of sorts. Oh and it’s gluten-free! It pairs well southern classics like grilled pork chop and braised greens. Enjoy!

[If you would like more information on celiac disease, what the symptoms are, how it is diagnosed and treated, visit the A World Celiac Community Foundation website, where Mary Neville is a board member.]

Buttermilk Spoonbread

 Yield: 4 portions

Time:  40 min.

 Ingredients:

Buttermilk 1 ½ cups
Yellow or white cornmeal, stone ground ½ cup
Butter, unsalted 2 tbsp.
Salt, kosher ¾ tsp.
Eggs, separated 3 ea.
Green onions, thinly sliced 3 ea.
Cheddar cheese, sharp ½ cup (optional)

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F. Butter sides and bottom of an 8×8 casserole dish or 4-6 small ramekins.
  2. Heat buttermilk in saucepan over medium heat. Stir in cornmeal and continue stirring until the mixture is thick, about 3 min. Remove from heat and let cool.
  3. Add egg yolks and green onions to cornmeal mixture and stir well.
  4. Beat egg whites to soft peaks. Fold in to cornmeal mixture using a rubber spatula.
  5. Pour mixture into pan or ramekins.
  6. Bake for 25-30 min. or until puffed and golden brown.
  7. Serve immediately.

Chef Notes:

Recipe adapted from RELISH, a recipe by Nancy Vienneau.

Señor Juan’s Pozole Rojo (Red Chile Pork and Hominy Stew)

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Pozole Rojo

Pozole Rojo

What I wouldn’t give for a huge bowl of pozole! I’m 6 1/2 months pregnant now, and I am so hungry all the time!

Pork shank and pork trotters

Pork leg and pork trotters

Bring to boil in a large pot of water with an onion and garlic cloves.

Bring to boil in a large pot of water with an onion and garlic cloves.

In my recent trip to Mexico I was able to photograph my Tio Juan as he made pozole rojo for our Christmas celebration.  Pozole is a traditional Mexican dish that consists of stewed pork, hominy, and spices. The  ingredients and preparation vary from one region to another. (This particular version is common in Northern Mexico.) My grandmother used to make humongous vats of pozole for Christmas Eve, and it is rumored that only my Tio Juan knows the secret recipe. So I was more than happy to document the whole process, for myself of course, but also to share it with you. Because it’s in moments like these, when you’re a ravenous pregnant woman, or when you’re extremely hung over, that you want to dig into a huge bowl of pozole and never look back.

Remove the seeds and stems from the chiles.

Remove the seeds and stems from the chiles.

From left to right, chile guajillo (left), chile ancho (middle), chile de arbol (right)

From left to right, chile guajillo (left), chile ancho (middle), chile de arbol (right)

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Rinse and cover with water. Bring to a boil.

Rinse and cover with water. Bring to a boil, simmer for 10 min.

poz12_172My Tio Juan has been in the restaurant business for a loong time. His current restaurant is in Mexico, D.F, and it is adequately called Sr. Juan. I haven’t been there yet, sadly, but the menu is a mix of my uncle’s northern Mexican roots and modern Mexican cuisine, with a touch of exotic ingredients. The restaurant also doubles as an art gallery with expositions from Arma Blanca and with live performances from artists such as Alex Ferreira, Gustavo Galindo, Sonido Landon, and Sofi Mayen. If only I lived closer, sigh!

Tio Juan

Tio Juan

Blend chiles with some of the soaking water until smooth. Strain.

Blend chiles with some of the soaking water until smooth. Strain. Cook in lard for 15 min.

The pozole was the highlight of our dinner that night, but spending time with my Tio made me realize how important it is to preserve family recipes. Sometimes, I wish I could go back in time and observe my grandmother while she cooks. Each generation adds a bit of a twist to the classic family dishes, but they remain mostly the same. Especially now that our families are multi-cultural and multi-generational, recipes are truly part of our heritage and are one of the best things we can pass on to our children. Gracias Tio for keeping this recipe alive!(Gracias Tio por compartir tu receta.)

I encourage you to try this recipe at home even if you’re unfamiliar with some of the ingredients. It is Mexican comfort food at its best, and if you happen to be traveling to  the D.F. in the near future, stop by Sr. Juan and try the pozole there. I have adapted this recipe at home to serve 6-8 people. Enjoy!

Remove pork from cooking liquid and remove bones and pull apart.

Remove pork from cooking liquid and remove bones and pull apart.

Rinse hominy and add to cooking liquid.

Rinse hominy and add to pot. Add pork and chile sauce back to pot and cook for 30 min. more

Toast chile piquin.

Toast chile piquin.

Blend with olive oil.

Blend with olive oil. Serve on the side.

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Señor Juan’s Pozole Rojo

 Yield:  6 – 8 servings

Time:  3hrs.

Ingredients:

Pork leg, cut into 2” pieces by butcher 2 ¼ lb.
Pork trotters, cut into 2” pieces by butcher 1 lb.
Garlic, cloves, peeled & crushed 6 ea.
Onion, peeled, cut in 1/2 ½ ea.
Chile guajillo, stemmed and seeded 5 ea.
Chile ancho, stemmed and seeded 2 ea.
Chile de arbol, stemmed and seeded 5 ea.
Lard, pork 2 tbsp.
Hominy, drained & rinsed 1 can (29 oz.)
Radishes, trimmed, julienned 10 ea.
Onion, white, large, minced 1 each
Green cabbage, cored, thinly sliced ¼ ea.
Limes, cut into quarters 4 ea.
Corn chips As needed

Chile Piquin Sauce

Olive Oil ½ cup
Chile piquin, dried ½ oz (1/4 cup)

Preparation:

  1. Place garlic onion, pork leg, pork trotters, and 3 quarts of water in a large heavy pot.  Bring to a boil over high heat.
  2. Reduce heat low- medium and simmer for about 2 ½ hrs. or until pork is tender. Skim the surface constantly.
  3. While pork is simmering, remove stems and seeds from the chile ancho, arbol, and guajillo. Rinse and place in a medium pot with water.
  4. Bring pot to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 min.
  5. Drain chiles and transfer them to a blender. Add 3 cups of the chile water and blend until smooth. Strain.
  6. Set a large sauce pot with lard to medium-high heat. Add chile mixture and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to low and simmer for 15 min. Set aside.
  7. Drain hominy, rinse and set aside.
  8. Transfer pork to a large bowl and shred using a fork or your hands. Remove bones and discard onion and garlic cloves.
  9. Return pork to pot and add chile mixture and hominy. Season with salt. Simmer for 30 min. more.
  10. To make the chile piquin sauce: toast the chiles over high heat on a dry sauté pan for 1-2 minutes. Trasnfer to a blender with ½ cup of olive oil. Blend until seeds are no longer visible, but the sauce is not completely smooth. Set aside.
  11. Serve pozole with limes, cut radishes, onion, cabbage, and chile piquin sauce as toppings and corn chips on the side.

Chef’s Notes:

The chile piquin sauce is super hot! If you like your pozole spicy add as much as you please.

Mandu (Korean Pork Dumplings)

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Mandu (Korean Pork Dumplings)

Mandu (Korean Pork Dumplings)

This week I have come to the conclusion that we might be a little bit weird around here.  I don’t think weird is the right word, but when it comes to our customs and the food we eat we definitely do not fit in any sort of box.

Salt cabbage and let sit for 45 min.

Salt cabbage and let sit for 45 min.

I’m Mexican and my husband is Korean-American. We are both professionals in the food world, which means we have been exposed to many different kinds of cuisines and we also cook them in our home. We have a four-year-old son who has tried and eaten more foods than the average American adult. There is no a-la-carte menu at home, so he eats what we make, there is no other option.

Clean mung beans

Clean mung beans

Blanch mung beans in boiling water for 1 min. and run under cold water.

Blanch mung beans in boiling water for 1 min. and run under cold water.

Mexican, American and Korean traditions and customs abound in our home and somehow coexist harmoniously. Sometimes not so much, like the time I made jicama kimchi. Ugh, not good. Other times it just kind of works, like having a traditional Korean 1st birthday party that included a piñata.

Sweet potato noodles.

Sweet potato noodles.

I’m about 6 months pregnant now and for the last couple of weeks I have been craving Korean food pretty badly. There aren’t any Korean restaurants near by, [it's the South!], but we did find a great Korean grocery store in Savannah. Ever since then, I have been eating tons of kimchi. This week, I made Korean dumplings (mandu) to celebrate Chinese New Year. We used them in a traditional rice cake soup called Tteokguk.

Mix all ingredients together and season with salt and pepper.

Mix all ingredients together and season with salt and pepper.

Filling

Filling

My mother-in-law taught me how to make these when I was a newly-wed, so I could make them every year for New Year’s. We didn’t really know each other very well and I was happy that she was willing to share her recipe with me. We made the mix together and had made about 25 dumplings when she announced she was going to the mall and would be back in a couple of hours. She just left me there making over 150 dumplings by myself! We only had one car back then, and the hubby had taken it to work. I think after dumpling 125 I broke down in tears! I don’t know why, I guess I was kind of hurt she just left me. I wanted to impress her, but I really didn’t want to make any more dumplings. Anyway, just newly-wed stuff I guess. I will tell you one thing though, I certainly did learn how to make Korean dumplings!

Place filling in center.

Place filling in center.

Moisten one of the edges with water and fold like a taco.

Moisten one of the edges with water and fold like a taco.

Moisten edge again and make 6 or 7 folds.

Moisten edge again and make 6 or 7 folds.

Yay! Dumplings

Yay! Dumplings

I have included a little video on how to fold the dumplings which could be a little complicated at first. Enjoy!

Kihong’s Mandu (Korean Dumplings)

Yield: 100 ea.

Time: 2-3 hrs.

 Ingredients:

Napa cabbage, cut into ¼ in. strips 5 cups
Pork, ground 1 lb.
Mung beans ½ lb.
Ginger, fresh, minced 1 tbsp.
Garlic, cloves, minced 3 ea.
Green onion, sliced 6 ea.
Onion, yellow, minced ¾ cup
Tofu, extra soft 1 pkg. (11 oz)
Korean vermicelli (sweet potato noodles) 4 oz
Salt, kosher To Taste
Black Pepper, ground To taste
Dumpling skins, round 2 pkgs.
Soy sauce 2/3 cup
Vinegar, white 1/3 cup
Sesame seeds 1 tsp.

 Preparation:

  1. Place cut cabbage in colander and sprinkle with 1 tsp. of salt. Let sit for 45 min. Squeeze water out and set aside.
  2. Place ground pork in a large bowl.
  3. Dunk mung beans in boiling water for 2 min., make sure they’re still crunchy. Remove from pot and run under cold water. Chop mung beans into ¼ in. pieces. Add to pork.
  4. Use a paper towel to dry tofu and crumble it over pork mixture.
  5. Cook noodles as directed by the package, run under cold water, and cut into ¼ inch pieces. Add to pork mixture.
  6. Add ginger, garlic, green onions, cabbage, onion, salt and pepper to the pork mixture. Mix ingredients by hand. This is your filling.
  7. To make sure your mix is seasoned correctly sauté a small patty of the mixture until cooked through. Then you will know if it needs more salt or pepper.
  8. Set up your station: a sheet pan sprinkled with cornmeal, a glass of cold water, dumpling skins wrapped in a moist paper towel to keep from drying out, and pork filling.
  9. To make the dumplings: place about 1 tsp. of the filling in the center of the dumpling skin. Use your finger to wet one edge of the dumpling skin. Fold skin in half, like a taco, and press edges together to seal. Use your fingers to fold the sealed edge of the dumpling 6 times.
  10. Repeat this process with the rest of the pork filling. Place dumplings on the sheet pan..
  11. To make dipping sauce: combine vinegar, soy sauce, and sesame seeds.
  12. You can freeze them the dumplings or steam them for 5 to 6 minutes. Serve with a dipping sauce

Charleston Cheese Spread

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Charleston Cheese Spread with homemade pita chips and vegetables

Charleston Cheese Spread with homemade pita chips and vegetables

We haven’t taken down the Christmas tree yet! Mmmmm, yeah. We have been procrastinating, big time, and today instead of taking it down I made this cheese spread. It’s a great recipe from the Lee brothers cookbook, Charleston Kitchen.

Combine all ingredients

Combine all ingredients

We have been living in the south for about 6 months now, and I’m still trying to figure out how things work around here. I think I’ve come to accept that alligators live among us, and that bugs are just part of the landscape. I continue to learn more and more about the food, but I still haven’t found a nice lady who will teach me the southern ways, which is what I really need. The abundance of oysters and shrimp is almost overwhelming, especially now that I’m pregnant and can’t eat oysters, but the bbq is tangy, smoky, and soo rich. I can definitely eat that! The biscuits for breakfast, the grits, and the greens cooked in bacon fat are all great comfort food, the kind that makes you feel all warm and fuzzy inside and keeps you coming back for more.

Process until smooth.

Process until smooth.

One of those typical southern dishes is pimento cheese. Traditionally it consists of cheddar cheese, pimentos, mayo, Worcestershire, and some kid of hot sauce. It is eaten with crackers, crudité platters, sandwiches, added to grits or even hamburgers. This recipe is reminiscent of pimento cheese, except for one thing, it has no pimentos. Instead it has horseradish, lemon juice, beer, cheddar cheese, and hot sauce; which makes this a savory, tangy, and spicy cheese dip. It’s a crowd pleaser, so be sure to take it to your next party.

Making pita chips.

Making pita chips.

Charleston Cheese Spread

 Yield: 2 cups

Time: 20 min.

Ingredients:

Cheddar cheese, grated 3 cups
Beer, lager or ale ¼ cup
Lemon juice, fresh 3 tbsp.
Ketchup 2 tbsp.
Worcestershire sauce 2 tbsp.
Horseradish, prepared, drained 1 tbsp.
Tabasco 2 tbsp.
Dry mustard 1 ½ tsp.
Garlic clove, minced 1 ea.

Preparation:

1. Combine all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until smooth. Serve.

Chef’s Notes: 

Recipe adapted from the Lee Brothers Charleston Kitchen. To make pita chips: cut pita bread into 8ths. Toss with oil and spread on a sheet tray with parchment paper. Bake at 350F for 10 to 15 min. or until golden brown.

The Best of 2013: Top 10 Posts on Dora´s Table

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Another year gone by…..let´s take a look at Dora´s Table top 10 posts of 2013.

This year has been a great one, filled with lots of surprises and bittersweet moments. However, I´m looking forward to 2014 and all that it will bring. As this little blog is concerned, I´m excited about where next year will take us. In 2013 we tripled our views and followers!! Hopefully we will continue to grow and share our recipes with you. Thank you for reading, for all of your likes, and your comments, they are truly appreciated.

Top 10 Posts 2013

  1. Chocolate Chip Challah Bread Pudding – You guys sure have a sweet tooth!
  2. Mango-Chile Popsicles (Paletas de Mango con Chile) – A Mexican classic.
  3. Sangrita: The Best Tequila Chaser – This one you need to try! It willl change the way you view tequila.
  4. Bibingka (Filipino Coconut Rice Cake) – This is an old Philipino family recipe given to me by a friend.
  5. Carlota de Limon (Key Lime Icebox Cake) – My favorite cake, after tres leches of course!
  6. “Pinche” Sauce (Creamy Chipotle Sauce) – This vegan sauce will surprise even the meat eaters out there.
  7. Marshmallow Fondant – Step by step instructions on how to make your own.
  8. Quinoa and Zucchini Stuffed Chile Relleno & Creamy Chipotle Sauce – A vegan main course with a Mexican touch.
  9. 5 Things You Should Know Before Marrying Someone in F & B – Are you thinking about marrying someone who works in restuarants? Read this.
  10. Lord Manderly’s Pork Pie – This one is for the fans of Game of Thrones and George R.R. Martin
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