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Vegan Chickpea Tuna Salad Stuffed Poblano

Vegan tuna salad was one of those things I refused to try for a long time. It sounded so unappetizing, I don’t think I was a fan of real tuna salad to begin, with so trying a vegan version seemed almost illogical. When I finally did, I realized I was sooo wrong. I may not have liked tuna, but I certainly do like chickpeas! This vegan chickpea tuna salad has mashed chickpeas, tomato, onion, serrano pepper, vegan mayo, olives, and capers. It is just the right amount of spicy and it is stuffed into a roasted poblano pepper.

This vegan chickpea tuna salad of mashed chickpeas, tomato, onion, serrano pepper, mayo, olives, and capers is stuffed into a poblano pepper.

This is another one of those Mexican lent dishes I was talking about last week. It is meant to be eaten cold, like a salad, but if you like it can be eaten warm. If you choose to eat it warm, I recommend serving it with this chipotle tomato sauce.  Another way to eat this vegan chickpea tuna salad is in a sandwich, tostadas or with crackers. It is perfect for an on-the-go lunch and it is full of protein. I made it just a couple of days ago to photograph it, and my dad asked if he could try it. I was a little nervous since my dad is definitely NOT VEGAN, but he really enjoyed it!

This vegan chickpea tuna salad of mashed chickpeas, tomato, onion, serrano pepper, mayo, olives, and capers is stuffed into a poblano pepper.

If you are looking for other recipes with poblano peppers you can try this traditional chile relleno filled with vegan cheese and fried until golden brown, or this roasted poblano pepper filled with quinoa and calabacitas and topped with a creamy vegan chipotle sauce. 

This vegan chickpea tuna salad of mashed chickpeas, tomato, onion, serrano pepper, mayo, olives, and capers is stuffed into a poblano pepper.

The Recipe: Vegan Chickpea Tuna Salad Stuffed Poblano

I usually try and find a brand of chickpeas that are very tender and soft. Some are more firm than others, or you can always cook them yourself. The more tender your chickpeas are, the creamier your tuna salad will be. If you can’t find vegan mayo or you are a no-oil vegan, you can substitute the mayo with mashed avocado or this oil-free vegan mayo. Enjoy!

This vegan chickpea tuna salad of mashed chickpeas, tomato, onion, serrano pepper, mayo, olives, and capers is stuffed into a poblano pepper.
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Vegan Chickpea Tuna Salad Stuffed Poblano Peppers

Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 2 Large chiles
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Large poblano peppers, roasted
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Chickpeas, drained, rinsed
  • 1 cup Diced tomatoes, fresh
  • 1/4 cup White onion, finely chopped
  • 1 Serrano chile, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped Manzanilla olives
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped capers
  • 1-2 tsp. Vegan mayo (see note)
  • 1/2 -1 tbsp. Liquid from pickled jalapeños, or lime juice

Instructions

  1. Roast, peel, and deseeded the poblano peppers. Set aside. 

  2. Place chickpeas in a shallow bowl and use a fork to mash them up. 

  3. Add tomatoes. onion, serrano, olives, capers and mix well. 

  4. Add the vegan mayo and 1/2 tbsp. of pickled jalapeño liquid or lime juice. Mix well.

  5. Season with salt and pepper and taste. If necessary, add remaining 1/2 tbsp. of pickled jalapeño liquid or lime juice.

  6. Place salad in fridge for 15 to 20 min. (optional)

  7. Stuff the poblano peppers with the chickpea salad and serve. 

Recipe Notes

 If you can't find vegan mayo or you are a no-oil vegan, you can substitute the mayo with mashed avocado or this oil-free vegan mayo. You can also add 1 tbsp. of nori flakes to make the salad more “fishy”. Here is a small tutorial on how to roast poblano peppers. This dish is meant to be eaten cold, like a salad, but if you like, it can be eaten warm. If you choose to eat it warm, I recommend serving it with this chipotle tomato sauce.  

 

 

 

 

 

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Roasted Romanesco Tarragon and Olives

This roasted romanesco with tarragon, olive and lemon is a healthy side dish to any meal. 

Romanesco is the ultimate confused vegetable. Is it broccoli or is it cauliflower? It is known as romanesco cauliflower, broccoli romanesco,  or roman broccoli. It is a variety of cauliflower, not a cross between broccoli and cauliflower, as is often thought. Its taste is very similar to cauliflower, but it is nuttier, sweeter, and with a softer texture when cooked. It is in season from late fall through winter. You can usually find them at your local farmer’s market, which is where I found mine. When selecting them be sure to look for a firm head with no signs of discoloring or yellow buds. To store them, cover in a damp paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic wrap, and place stem side up in the refirgerator. It will keep fresh for about a week. To prepare, wash and cut just as you would a cauliflower.

This roasted romanesco with tarragon, olive and lemon is a healthy side dish to any meal. It is nutty and sweet, similar to cauliflower.

I’m having a crisis, a food crisis. I’ve been avoiding the blog, because I’m having a hard time coming to terms with the truth. The hubby and I have decided to keep practicing the plant based diet after Lent is over. We plan on eating like normal human beings one day a week. One day a week!!! ” What about cheese? No more cheese!”, is all that keeps going through my head.

I have been having some health problems, in the last 3 years, that have caused me a lot of discomfort. Medicine hasn’t helped or any other doctor recommendation, and I have finally reached the point where I would try anything to make it better. Well, just in the first week of cutting out all animal products from my diet, most of my symptoms disappeared, thus our decision to stick to this plant-based “nonsense”. Surprisingly my hubby is on board with this, not only to be supportive towards me, but because he has seen an increase in energy and his day-to-day life, and because frankly he feels good.

This roasted romanesco with tarragon, olive and lemon is a healthy side dish to any meal. It is nutty and sweet, similar to cauliflower.

Don’t worry, I’m not making this a vegan or plant-based blog. I hate labels, what if I start calling this a vegan blog and one month later I change my mind? We’re hoping that by eating animal products one day a week we won’t feel too deprived and be able to keep this going for longer than 40 days. I don’t know, we’ll see how it goes.

The Recipe: Roasted Romanesco Tarragon and Olives

You can eat Romanesco raw, steamed, sautéed, roasted, and boiled. We like it roasted the best, but it is great in pasta, mashed with potatoes, in soups, or raw in salads. Enjoy!

This roasted romanesco with tarragon, olive and lemon is a healthy side dish to any meal. It is nutty and sweet, similar to cauliflower.
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Roasted Romanesco Tarragon and Olives

Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 2 heads Romanesco cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 tbsp. Olive oil
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Olives, green, manzanilla, sliced
  • 1 tbsp. Tarragon, fresh, roughly chopped
  • 2 tsp. Lemon juice, fresh
  • ¼ tsp. Lemon zest

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375F.
  2. In a large bowl combine romanesco, olive oil, salt, and pepper and toss to coat.
  3. Place romanesco on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper and cover with foil. Roast for 30 min.
  4. Uncover and raise oven temperature to 400F. Roast for 15 more minutes.
  5. Remove romanesco from oven and combine with fresh tarragon, lemon juice, lemon zest, and olives. Adjust seasoning and serve.

Recipe Notes

This recipe will also work with cauliflower.

Here are some other ways to use romanesco:

Romanesco, celery root and Broccoli Soup – pineappleandcoconut.com

Linguine with romanesco and scampi – latartinegourmande.com

Romanesco and sweet potato gratin – cookinginsens.wordpress.com