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Gallina Pinta is a beautiful thick stew of pinto beans, hominy, Anaheim Chile, and herbs. Served with a splash of lime juice, chopped cilantro, onion, and Chile chiltepin. It is a dish so local to the state of Sonora that you might not have heard of it before!

pinto beans soaking in a pink bowl on a stone surface

Traditionally it is made with beef, but for this vegan version, we are simply omitting it, and believe me when I say that it is equally delicious! What makes this recipe so special is that it’s made in the slow-cooker. Hours of slow simmering produces tender beans and bursting hominy (The real stuff here!! No cans were used in the production of this recipe).

beans, hominy, onion, garlic, anaheim chile in a slow cooker covered in water

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Bean and hominy soup in a large pot

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Sonora, is the creation of the talented Natalia Vanegas, and here she is sharing her story with us.

bean and hominy soup in a large pot with a full ladle lifted up over the soup

Natalia’s Story:

Changing my diet has been a long process, it didn’t happen overnight. I began a diet to lose weight which recommended the elimination of all dairy products and red meats. I could only eat chicken or fish 1-2 times per week. I followed this diet for two months until I accomplished my weight-loss goal, but since I was feeling so great I considered the possibility of becoming vegetarian, consequently, I began to eliminate all meat from my diet.

Gallina pinta soup in a melon colored bowl with toast on the side

I continued to cook for my family as I always had, but when serving the food I would simply not put the meat on my plate, on occasion I would eat fish though. Around the same time, late 2010 I watched a video by the activist Gary Yourofsky, this caused a great impact in my life and it was the first time I heard the term “vegan”, but at that moment I didn’t know how to make such a drastic change. It was clear to me that consuming cow’s milk was completely unnecessary and in certain cases, it could be harmful to your health. I began consuming soy milk or almond milk, but every once in a while I would eat cheese when I was traveling, in restaurants or at social reunions.

Gallina pinta soup in a melon colored bowl surrounded by lime, toasted bread

It wasn’t until 2017, when I had more nutritional information at my disposal, that I decided to stop being a closeted vegetarian and become fully plant-based. I am now more conscious of the nutrients my body needs. I still cook my favorite foods but in vegan versions; I eat a lot of grains and legumes, that, of course, I had eaten before, but not often. I enjoy cooking so much more now, and I often experiment with new ingredients and different types of recipes. Blogs like Dora’s have been a great help with their recipes and stories of their daily lives, tips of places to eat, and products to use. This makes it easy to live vegan and still enjoy good food!

Lime being squeezed into gallina pinta bowl of soup

The Recipe: Gallina Pinta

  • If you can’t find dry hominy, you can use canned. Add it during the final ½ hour of cooking.
  • You can also make this in your instant pot on manual setting, high pressure for 40 min.
  • I recommend you slow cook this, it is well known that slow cooked beans are so much better!
  • If your slow cooker is small, half the recipe.
  • If you can’t find Anaheim peppers, you can use serrano peppers, but the flavor will change. Some people also prepare it with chile guajillo (chile Colorado) which is essentially dried anaheim pepper.
  • The original recipe contains beef, but you can substitute with jackfruit, mushrooms or your favorite meat substitute. I prefer to simply omit the beef and I quite enjoy it. Enjoy!!
Gallina pinta soup in a melon colored bowl surrounded by lime, toasted bread

GALLINA PINTA

Gallina Pinta Soup, a thick stew of beans and hominy made in the Sonora style, an authentic Mexican recipe gone vegan
4.12 from 9 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: gallina pinta, vegan mexican recipes, vegan soups
Prep Time: 12 hours
Cook Time: 12 hours
Servings: 8 -10 people
Calories: 302kcal
Author: Natalia Vanegas

Ingredients

  • 14 oz. Pinto beans, dried
  • 14 oz. Dried Pozole, (prepared hominy)
  • 1 head Garlic, peeled
  • 1 White onion, cut into ¼’s
  • 1 Anaheim pepper, stemmed and deseeded (increase quantity according to taste)
  • 1 tbps. Coriander seeds
  • 1 gallon Water
  • Salt to taste, add at the end when the hominy has “burst”

Garnish:

Instructions

  • Clean the beans and soak them for 8 – 12 hours, discard the soaking water and rinse the beans.
  • Place the hominy in a strainer and rinse until the water is clear.
  • Place the beans, hominy, garlic, onion, Anaheim pepper, and coriander seeds in the slow-cooker. Add water (according to the instructions on your slow cooker). Cook on low for 12 hours.
  • Check periodically and add more water if necessary.
  • When the beans are cooked and the hominy has “burst”, remove the chile skins and add salt to taste.
  • Serve hot in large bowl. Place garnishes on the table so everyone can garnish their own plate.

Notes

I recommend you slow cook this, it is well known that slow cooked beans are so much better!
If your slow cooker is small, half the recipe.
If you can’t find Anaheim peppers, you can use serrano peppers, but the flavor will change. Some people also prepare it with chile guajillo (chile Colorado) which is essentially dried Anaheim pepper.
The original recipe contains beef, but you can substitute with jackfruit, mushrooms or your favorite meat substitute. I prefer to simply omit the beef and I quite enjoy it. Enjoy!!

Nutrition

Calories: 302kcal | Carbohydrates: 57g | Protein: 17g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 129mg | Potassium: 992mg | Fiber: 15g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 140IU | Vitamin C: 15.3mg | Calcium: 146mg | Iron: 4.5mg

If you’ve never tried vegan pozole verde you’re in for a treat. Wild mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with creamy avocado, crisp lettuce and fresh radishes.

mushrooms cooking in a pot for vegan pozole verde

Pozole is a dish of pre-hispanic origins, the name pozole comes from the Nahuatl word “pozolli” which means ‘frothy’. Which refers to the appearance of the white corn as it’s boiled. It was a dish reserved for special celebrations and religious ceremonies. Legend has it that it was made with human flesh, as an offering to the gods for a fruitful harvest. (Gross!)

pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, cilantro and poblano in blender for vegan pozole verde

Nowadays, there are actually 3 most common types of pozole: rojo, blanco and verde. Red pozole is seasoned with a mixture of dried chiles, white pozole is seasoned with herbs, and green pozole usually contains pumpkins seeds, tomatillos, and green chiles.

Smooth green sauce in blender for vegan pozole verde

The recipe varies according to the state that you’re in. For pozole verde you can find a version from Jalisco, one from Guerrero, and one from Guanajuato.  They are all very similar with small variations like adding poblano peppers, or the toppings change from state to state.

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

I loved the addition of pumpkin seeds to this vegan pozole verde, because it adds a touch of creaminess to the broth without using oil or cream. You can make this pozole anytime, but it would be a great addition to your Christmas or Thanksgiving menus.

I’m not going to lie, I enjoyed this so much I ate the whole batch myself in a couple of days! I hope you like it too.

The Recipe: Vegan Pozole Verde

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of Serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.
  • Enjoy

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Vegan pozole verde topped with lettuce, radishes, and avocado in a blue and white talavera bowl

Vegan Pozole Verde

Vegan pozole verde, mushrooms and hominy are stewed in a spicy tomatillo-pumpkin seed broth. Then topped with avocado, lettuce and radishes.
4.53 from 23 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course, Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: pozole verde, vegan pozole
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 375kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 1 ½ lb. Maitake or oyster mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup Diced onion
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ cup Raw pumpkin seeds, pepitas
  • 2 Poblano peppers
  • 3-4 Serrano peppers
  • 4 Tomatillos, medium
  • 1/2 cup Chopped cilantro
  • 1 cup Leafy greens, spinach, radish greens, swiss chard
  • 1 sprig Epazote
  • ¼ tsp. Cumin, ground
  • ¼ tsp. Mexican oregano, dried
  • 2 qts. Vegetable stock
  • 1 can (29oz) White hominy 29 oz, drained, and rinsed

Garnishes:

  • 1 Avocado, pitted and diced
  • 4 Red radishes, sliced
  • ½ Head Romaine or iceberg lettuce, finely shredded (julienned)
  • 4 Tostadas

Instructions

  • In a large pot set to medium heat sauté the mushrooms in 1 tbsp. of oil until golden brown about 6-8 min.
  • While the mushrooms are cooking, toast the pumpkin seeds lightly in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • Remove the mushrooms from the pot, and add the onions. Turn heat down to medium-low and sweat onions until tender and transparent about 4-5 minutes.
  • Add garlic and cook for two more minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot. Pour in the vegetable stock and hominy and simmer softly until you are ready to add the sauce.
  • Turn oven broiler on to HI setting.
  • Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, and tomatillos on a sheet tray lined with foil. Place under the broiler for 3 minutes or until the peppers have begun to get dark spots. Flip the peppers and tomatillos over and let cook for 3 more minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  • Place the poblano peppers in bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit 5 minutes.
  • Peel poblano peppers and remove the stems and seeds.
  • Place the poblano peppers, serrano peppers, pumpkin seeds, tomatillos, greens, epazote, cilantro, cumin, and oregano in a blender and process until smooth.
  • 10. Strain the sauce into a medium sauce pot set to medium-low heat. Let sauce simmer for 5-6 minutes or until it changes to a darker green color.
  • 11. Pour sauce into the pot with the mushrooms and hominy and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 8-10 minutes, and season with salt and pepper.
  • 12. Serve with garnishes.

Notes

  • I think the mushrooms are perfect in this, but you can also use jackfruit.
  • I used hen of the woods mushrooms (maitake), but if you can’t find those, you can also use oyster or shiitake mushrooms.
  • You can increase or decrease the amount of serrano peppers according to your heat tolerance.
  • Chayote or zucchini would make a good addition to this.

Nutrition

Calories: 375kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 2053mg | Potassium: 1460mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 2605IU | Vitamin C: 66.7mg | Calcium: 70mg | Iron: 5.1mg
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These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema. They are crazy easy to make, and are so good you’ll be making them again and again.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

In Mexico these are known simply as encacahuatadas, and are a classic home cooked dish. They are usually filled with chicken, but your favorite vegetable filling will go great with these. They would make a great dinner, or even a good brunch option.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Let me just say that I am obsessed with this sauce. I have been putting it on everything! So far it is perfect with the enchiladas, but you can also put it on your baked potatoes, polenta, pasta, tacos, buddha bowls, and tofu. I’m one of those people that falls in love with a sauce or dish and then I makes it over and over again until I get tired it. This is one of those sauces. So you definitely have to try it.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Summer is coming up and I am so not ready to have all the kids home. Not ready!! The first couple of weeks are always a little rough, but once we get into a groove we really have fun. My two older ones are always arguing and bothering each other, which can get really stressful sometimes, but our sweet baby is always all smiles. What are some of your summer plans?? I’ll tell you what I am ready for, all the delicious summer fruit. 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

The Recipe: Spicy Peanut Sauce Enchiladas

  • Your favorite veggie filling will be perfect with these
  • If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds.
  • Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.
  • You can use cashew or almond crema
  • Do not place these in the oven because they will fall apart.

 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
4.8 from 5 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: peanut enchiladas, spicy peanut sauce, vegan enchiladas
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 387kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 8 Guajillo Chiles stems and seeds removed, rinsed
  • 1-2 Chipotle pepper in adobo
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • 1 cup Peanuts, toasted
  • 1 Plum tomato, roasted
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground clove
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Filling

  • 1 lb. Mushrooms. cremini sliced
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 oz. Spinach or other leafy green, roughly chopped
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Almond crema

Instructions

To make the peanut sauce:

  • Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Drop in the guajillo chiles and turn heat down to a simmer, let simmer for 10 min.
  • Drain guajillo chiles and place in blender with peanuts, chipotle chiles, garlic, roasted tomato, clove, and vegetable stock. Blend until smooth. If necessary add more stock until you reach the desired consistency.If you do not have a high powered blender, strain the sauce. Set aside.

To make the filling:

  • Add ¼ cup of water or vegetable stock to a large sauté pan set to medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until almost all the moisture has evaporated from the mushrooms and they are beginning to brown. Add more liquid if necessary.
  • Lower heat to medium-low and add the garlic, cook for 1 min. Add the spinach and stir. Cover pan and let spinach cook down, 2 -3 minutes. Add hominy and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

To assemble

  • Bring a medium sauce pot to low-medium heat and pour in sauce. Heat just enough to get it hot. If it simmers, the sauce might break.
  • Warm corn tortillas in the microwave for 30 seconds or in the oven at 350F on a sheet tray for 5 min. Just enough so that the tortillas are soft enough to be rolled.
  • Spread 2-3 tbsp. of the peanut sauce on the bottom of a 9 x13 baking dish, Place 1 tbsp. of filling on each tortilla. Roll and place on baking dish. Continue this process until you have used up all the tortillas and the entire filling.
  • Pour the rest of the peanut sauce on top of the enchiladas and drizzle almond crema on top.

Notes

If the sauce and the filling are hot there is no need to put the enchiladas in the oven. If you would rather place them in the oven do so at 350°F for 5-7 minutes. If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds. Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 387kcal | Carbohydrates: 57g | Protein: 18g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 648mg | Potassium: 1392mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 7490IU | Vitamin C: 21.8mg | Calcium: 170mg | Iron: 4.3mg
Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Fat 10g15%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 648mg28%
Potassium 1392mg40%
Carbohydrates 57g19%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 18g36%
Vitamin A 7490IU150%
Vitamin C 21.8mg26%
Calcium 170mg17%
Iron 4.3mg24%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Pozole is a hearty, spicy, satisfying Mexican soup. It is said to be a hangover cure, which I cannot confirm, but it is certainly a special occasion dish and is often served on Christmas and New Year’s. There are three varieties most commonly served: rojo, verde y blanco. Traditionally pozole is made with pork shank, trotters and shoulder, but of course, this will no longer work for us, so I have created this jackfruit vegan pozole rojo recipe just for you.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This is an adaptation of my grandmother’s famous recipe. Every Christmas for as long as I can remember my grandmother would make two of the biggest pots of pozole and menudo I have ever seen. The adults would salivate over it, talk about how good it was going to be, and would go over to the kitchen and stir the pots to see how much longer it would be until they finally had their pozole. One year I decided I was going to see what the big deal was, and I waited until the kitchen was empty. Then I went over to the pot and grabbed the ginormous ladle. I gave the whole thing a stir and almost fainted and threw up all over myself at the same time! (I must have been about 8 yrs. old.) When I stirred the pot a couple of pork trotters rose up to surface and I swear I saw a pig snout, but I might of imagined that. After that, it took me years to give pozole a try, but I eventually became one of those salivating adults waiting for the pozole to be done each Christmas.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

Now that I no longer eat meat it was only natural that I made a vegan version of this dish. Originally, I was going to make this with mushrooms instead of jackfruit, since I know jackfruit is not easily accesible to many. However, when I went to the grocery store I discovered that here in Hawaii button mushrooms are $8.00 a pound! I quickly decided instead to pay about $5 for two cans of green jackfruit. I am so happy with the result and I know you will be too. It is just as I remember it, so deeply satisfying.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

The Recipe: Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

I have used canned hominy to speed things up, but if you have access to dried hominy you can use that instead. (Dried hominy takes about 2 hours to cook.) Pozole is all about the toppings. Serve with dried oregano, diced white onion, lime wedges, sliced radishes, and shredded cabbage. My grandma used to serve a salsa macha on the side as well for the ones who wanted more heat. Here is a recipe from Mexico in my Kitchen that is very similar to my grandma’s, only she used chile piquín instead of árbol. Enjoy!

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

Vegan Jackfruit Pozole Rojo, a spicy soup made with dried chiles, hominy, jackfruit, and veggies. 
4.59 from 39 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: jackfruit, vegan pozole
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 can (29 oz.) White hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 3 quarts Vegetable Stock
  • 5 Chile guajillo, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 2 Chile ancho, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 5 Chile de árbol, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • ½ Onion, white
  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 2 cans (20oz./ea) Young green jackfruit brine, drained
  • 1 Zucchini, medium, cut into dice

Toppings

  • 1 White onion, small, minced
  • 6 Red radishes, sliced into batons
  • 2 tbsp. Oregano, dried
  • ½ Green cabbage, cored, thinly sliced
  • 4 Limes cut into quarters
  • 1 bag Corn chips or tostadas

Instructions

  • In a large pot, combine the vegetable stock and hominy and bring to a LOW simmer.
  • While the hominy is simmering, remove stems and seeds from the chile ancho, arbol, and guajillo. Rinse and place in a medium pot with water.
  • Bring pot to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 min.
  • Drain chiles, but reserve 1 ½ cups of the chile water. Place chiles, garlic and onion in the blender, add the chile water and blend until smooth. Strain.
  • To prepare the jackfruit, drain the jackfruit, rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes on each side or until it begins to brown. Pour the chile sauce over the jackfruit and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 10 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Your hominy should still be simmering very slowly. Scoop out one cup of the hominy-vegetable stock mixture and blend until smooth. Pour this back into the pot with the hominy
  • Raise heat to medium-low, and add the zucchini and shredded jackfruit with sauce. Let simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until the zucchini is tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 
  • Serve your pozole with all of the toppings on the side.

Video

Notes

If you don’t have access to jackfruit you can use 2lbs. of mixed mushrooms or soy curls instead. You can substitute the zucchini with chayote with excellent results. If you like your pozole really spicy serve it with this salsa macha from Mexico in my Kitchen