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There’s nothing better than warm whole wheat flour tortillas, just made and slathered in butter. These tortillas take the best of both worlds. The combination of all-purpose flour with wheat germ, and wheat bran result in a soft, yet not gummy tortilla that will conquer your heart.

stainless steel bowl with all purpose flour, wheat bran, wheat germ, baking powder, and salt
stainless steel bowl with flour mixture and vegetable shortening

This is a family recipe. My güelita Lolita is famous for her tortillas integrales (whole wheat flour tortillas), and she was more than happy to share the recipe with us. Northern Mexico is known for flour tortillas. Most people think flour tortillas are not Mexican, but this is totally not true. Flour tortillas are eaten all across northern Mexico, almost as much as corn tortillas!

a hand up close showing the texture of the flour mixture

History of Flour Tortillas

Wheat arrived in Mexico with the Spanish around 1543. The Spanish accustomed to eating wheat were not big fans of corn tortillas. However it wasn’t in central Mexico where wheat took its stronghold but in the north. Northern Mexico, specifically the state of Sonora, Southern California, and Arizona were once considered one of the breadbaskets of America.

water added to the stainless steel bowl with the flour mixture
a large ball of dough in a stainless steel bowl

Some believe the flour tortilla is the new world version of a Middle Eastern flatbread, a product of Jewish and Arab influence in Spanish cuisine. Flour tortillas in Mexico very in size from small and a bit thick like in Coahuila, to incredibly large and thin, like in Sonora. (There’s a tortilla in Sonora called la sobaquera (armpit tortilla), because it’s so large that when you’re stretching it it reaches your armpit.)

small balls of dough lined on a parchment lined sheet tray

In some regions flour tortillas are made with lard, in others with a combination of lard and vegetable shortening, and in some places only vegetable shortening. This whole wheat version of the tortilla is the Mexican equivalent of “healthy”, the wheat germ and wheat bran add some fiber and earthiness to this Mexican classic.

ball of tortilla dough rolled out really thin on a piece of parchment

The Recipe: Whole Wheat Flour Tortillas

  • My grandma uses vegetable shortening in her recipe, but this will also work with refined coconut oil.
  • The longer the dough rests the softer the tortillas will be. Leaving the dough overnight in the refrigerator is recommended.
  • Roll the tortillas as thin as you possibly can.
  • These tortillas are not meant to make burritos. They are perfect for tacos.
a stack of whole wheat tortillas on a white linen towel with green stripes
a stack of whole wheat tortillas on a white linen towel with green stripes, with the top tortilla folded over

Whole Wheat Flour Tortilla

There’s nothing better than warm whole wheat flour tortilla, just made and slathered in butter. These tortillas take the best of both worlds. The combination of all purpose flour with wheat germ, and wheat bran result in a soft, yet not gummy tortilla that will conquer your heart.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: butternut squash and mushroom tacos, shortening, wheat bran, wheat germ
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
1 hour
Servings: 12 tortillas
Calories: 124kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups All-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup Wheat germ
  • 3/4 cup Wheat bran
  • 1 ½ tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1/3 cup Vegetable shortening
  • 3/4 cup Warm water

Instructions

  • In a large bowl combine the flour, wheat bran, wheat germ, baking powder, salt, and mix well. Add vegetable shortening and use your fingers to to rub the shortening into the flour mixture until completely incorporated.
  • Pour water in and mix with a fork until. If the dough is too dry, add a bit more water.
  • Scoop mixture out into a cutting board and knead until smooth (about 3-4 minutes). The dough should be soft and stretchy, but not as soft as bread dough.
  • Cover dough with plastic wrap and let rest for at least 1 hour. (The longer the dough rests the softer your tortillas will be.)
  • Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and roll into balls. Heat a cast iron skillet or comal to medium-high heat.
  • Sprinkle flour on your work surface, flatten the ball of dough with your hand. Using a rolling pin, begin to roll back and forth across the ball, rotating it slightly each time, and sprinkling more flour as necessary, until the dough has stretched out to make a large thin circle. Try to roll it as thin as you possibly can.
  • Lay the tortilla on the comal and flip after 30 to 40 seconds The tortilla should bubble up almost immediately. Cook 30 more seconds on the other side and remove from pan. Be careful not to overcook the tortillas or they will become crisp. Remove tortillas from pan and place in a tortilla warmer or kitchen towel.
  • Repeat this process with the rest of the dough.

Notes

  • My grandma uses vegetable shortening in her recipe, but this will also work with refined coconut oil.
  • The longer the dough rests the softer the tortillas will be. Leaving the dough overnight in the refrigerator is recommended.
  • Roll the tortillas as thin as you possibly can.
  • These tortillas are not meant to make burritos. They are perfect for tacos.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tortilla | Calories: 124kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 161mg | Potassium: 143mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 33mg | Iron: 1mg

I have done it! After three failed attempts, here is the best marranitos recipe (Mexican piggy cookies) ever, and it’s vegan!!. Ok, I might be a little too excited about this one, but hear me out. This is my favorite pan dulce, you can ask any of my family members, and they will be sure to tell you I have eaten many marranitos in my life!

Piloncillo syrup for making this marranitos recipe

A marranito is a Mexican pastry shaped like a piggy. It can be soft like a sweet bread or more on the hard side like a cookie. This version is the perfect combination of a pastry and a cookie. It is made with a combination of whole wheat and white flour and infused with a piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon syrup.

Flour mixed with piloncillo syrup in a stainless steel bowl

I’ve reworked this recipe from a couple years ago to include a good amount of fat. When I first created this recipe I was trying to be no-oil, but quickly realized that I just can’t do it. I do try to limit the amount of oil that I use in cooking, but when it’s something as delicious as this marranito pan dulce fat is good once in a while. 

Dough mixed in a stainless steel bowlThey taste just as they should, so much so, that the kids ate them so fast I hardly had time to photograph them. We dunked them in the thickest Mexican hot chocolate.

Marranitos lined up on a sheet tray getting ready to bake

The Recipe: The Best Vegan Marranitos

  • I recommend eating the marranitos by dunking them in hot chocolate or coffee.
  • If you would like to make these without fat you can substitute the amount of vegan butter with apple sauce.
  • You can find the marranitos cookie cutter that I used right HERE Enjoy!

 

Here is the best vegan marranito (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

Marranitos

A marranito is a Mexican pastry shaped like a piggy. It can be soft like a sweet bread or more on the hard side like a cookie.
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cochinitos, cochitos, pan dulce, piloncillo
Prep Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
Servings: 8 large marranitos
Calories: 170kcal
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

Piloncillo Syrup

  • 2/3 cup Water
  • 1 cone Piloncillo, (8 oz)
  • 2 Cloves, whole
  • 1 stick Mexican cinnamon (2 inches)
  • 1 Star anise

Marranitos

  • 1 cup + 2 tbsp. Flour, all-purpose
  • 1 cup Flour, whole wheat
  • 1 tsp. Baking soda
  • 1 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/3 cup Vegan butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup Piloncillo syrup

"Egg Wash"

  • 2 tbsp Unsweetened plant milk
  • 1 tbsp Maple syrup

Instructions

To make the Piloncillo Syrup

  • Place water, piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and star anise in a medium saucepot set to medium heat. Simmer slowly and stir until the piloncillo dissolves. Continue to simmer until the mixture has the consistency of natural maple syrup. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Strain. (For this recipe we will only be using 1/2 cup of the piloncillo syrup. You can save the rest to use later.)

To make the marranitos

  • In a large bowl, combine the whole wheat and all-purpose flours, baking powder, and baking soda.
  • Combine 1/2 cup of the piloncillo syrup with the melted butter and mix well.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until the dough begin to comes together.
  • Use your hands to incorporate the dough together and form a ball. The dough will be on the wet side. If the dough is too dry add a bit more of the piloncillo syrup.
  • Cover in plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 30 - 1 hour.
  • Preheat oven to 350F.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge and roll out on a floured surface to 1/3 inch thickness.
  • Use a large pig-shaped cookie cutter to cut out the dough and place them on a parchment-lined sheet tray.
  • Reform the dough scraps into a ball and roll out again to cut out more marranitos. Repeat this process until you cannot cut out any more.
  • Combine the plant milk and maple syrup in a small bowl to make your "egg wash". Brush marranitos with "egg wash".
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the marranitos are golden brown on the bottom.
  • Remove from oven and let cool slightly.

Notes

 If you would like to make these without fat substitute the vegan butter with apple sauce.

Nutrition

Calories: 170kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 228mg | Potassium: 117mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 36mg | Iron: 1mg
Marranitos sitting by a cup of hot chocolate and a blue napkin
marranito being dipped into hot chocolate in a talavera cup

I’ve always been deeply suspicious of vegetarians and vegans. In restaurants they’re a pain in the butt, with all their special requests and demands. I have tried to be empathetic, but really, who willingly gives up all kind of animal product? Don’t they know how delicious a medium rare steak is? or a slice of Manchego cheese from Spain? I’m also guilty of being inconsiderate towards them, like the time we invited our vegetarian friend to eat at Animal Restaurant! We didn’t do it on purpose, we completely forgot. Luckily they had a couple of vegetarian options.

I recently watched the documentary Forks over Knives and read the book the China Study. I also just read a really good blog that talks about the myths of nutrition. All this reading has made me more aware of the food I eat or should be eating and what I feed my family. So as an offering for Lent we will be eating a whole foods plant based diet. This means no animal product of any kind, and no processed foods. How is this different from veganism? We are making this choice for health reasons not political ones. We love animals, but we also love to eat them. This has never been an issue for us, but when you read things like:

“Those who eat more whole, plant-based foods not only have lower cholesterol levels, but have less heart disease.”

“That a diet high in animal protein gives rise to cancer cells, and allows more rapid growth of tumors once they have officially formed.”

“Multiple sclerosis has been linked to animal food consumption, especially dairy consumption.”

“A whole-foods plant based diet can protect against and even treat a wide variety of chronic diseases.” (The China Study by T. Colin Campbell & Thomas M. Campbell II)

……..you can’t just continue to eat the way you did before. Will this eventually lead to a full conversion to the other side? I don’t think so, but it is yet to be seen.

How do we eat now? A week of dinners looks like this:

Monday: Pan roasted Steelhead Trout, Roasted Baby Fennel & Cherry Toamtoes, Celery Root Mash.

Tuesday: Eat out (this week we had pizza)

Wednesday: Turkey Chilli, Cornbread & Black Bean, Corn & Tomato Salad in a lime-avocado dressing.

Thursday: Roasted Chicken, Baked Sweet Potatoes, Kale braised with garlic, onion, apple cider, chicken stock, and almonds.

Friday: Whole wheat pasta, olive oil, oven dried cherry tomatoes, sugar snap peas, garlic, red pepper flakes, & mushrooms.

Saturday: Shredded Chicken Tinga, Avocado, Salsa, Tortillas & Beans.

Sunday: Leftover day

I buy most of our produce at the local farmer’s market, and cook almost everything from scratch. I’m not obsessive about buying organic, I focus on buying mostly local. I spend about $120-$140 a week on groceries for a family of 3. We drink water with our meals and enjoy wine, cocktails and beer whenever possible. When it comes to processed food we buy staples like bread, crackers, tortillas & peanut butter. We also indulge in the occasional donut, muffin, cookie, cake, and ice cream. We love ice cream!

When we eat out it’s another story. We are professional cooks, so we eat everything and anything we can get our hands on. We take it upon ourselves to taste as much as possible. Bottom line is, we enjoy eating and cooking, it’s our job and our passion.

I will be posting recipes here and pictures of what we’re cooking or eating on Pinterest, you can find us as Dora Stone. For now here is a recipe for whole wheat bread, it’s easy to make and contains no additives, preservatives or high fructose corn syrup like your typical grocery store sandwich bread.

The Recipe: Whole Wheat Honey Bread

This bread is hearty and soft with a touch of sweet. Perfect for sandwiches and toast.

Whole Wheat Honey Bread

Recipe adapted from Orangette: Rancho la Puerta Whole Wheat Bread
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Cook Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 2 loaves
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 2 ¼ cups Whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup Wheat bran
  • ½ cup Oat flour
  • 1 tbsp. Active dry yeast 1 pkg
  • 1 tsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 tbsp. Oil, canola
  • 1/8 cup Honey
  • 1 ¾ cups Water warm

Instructions

  • In a large bowl combine the oil, active dry yeast, water, and honey. Stir and set aside for 5 to 6 minutes or until the mixture bubbles and foams.
  • Spray 1- 8×5 loaf pan with cooking spray.
  • In a medium bowl combine the flours and the salt. Add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients 1 cup at a time, mixing with a wooden spoon until all flour is incorporated.
  • Turn the dough out into a lightly floured surface and knead for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and elastic. To test if the dough, insert your thumb into the dough for 5 seconds. If your thumb comes out clean the dough is ready.
  • Preheat oven to 350F. Shape the dough into a loaf and place in the pan. Cover with a dish towel and let rise until it doubles in size, for about 1 hour.
  • Bake bread on the center rack of the oven for about 40 min. or until the crust is golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.
  • Cool completely on a rack before slicing.

Notes

To make this vegan, you can substitute the honey for agave nectar