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Known as the land of the seven moles, Oaxaca’s crown jewel is without a doubt Mole Negro. A dark smoky, slightly bitter, and incredibly rich sauce is paired with cauliflower in the vegan version.

Toasted peanuts, bread, tortillas, plantains, and pumpkin seeds in a saute pan.

Don’t let the ingredient list for this black mole scare you. Mole is quite simple to make, it’s only a little time consuming, but it is the combination of ingredients such as chile chilhuacle rojo and negro, chile mulato, chile pasilla, burnt tortilla, peanuts, raisins, pumpkin seeds, and chocolate that makes this dish so unique.

Charred tomatoes, tomatillos, garlic, and onion in a saute pan.

This particular version a little bit non traditional since it substitutes coconut oil for lard, goji berries for raisins, and has the addition of turmeric. All beautiful ingredients that serve to enrich the sauce while keeping its authentic flavor.

Dried chiles soaking in water in a stainless steal pot.

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Chocolate being added to the mole negro sauce.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Oaxaca, is the creation of Fernanda Alvarez from @lahealthymexicana here she tells you a bit of her story.

Fernanda’s Story:

I was proudly born and raised in Mexico. Five years ago I arrived in the United States and I now call it my home. I am passionate about sharing health and well being through food, and I am a firm believer that you don’t need to consume animals, that what is needed is more superfoods, and more home-cooked meals.

When I was 15 years old I was diagnosed with hypoglycemia, but for a long time, I had been living with food intolerances that did not allow me to live a happy life.

Mole negro enmoladas on a talavera plate and a bright orange tablecloth with flowers behind it.

When I discovered and experienced that I could heal everything that was keeping me from living a healthy life with food, I decided to share it with the world so I could help other people live longer and better lives regardless of their intolerance or illness while at the same time nourishing themselves with delicious food.

Fork digging into a plate of mole negro enmoladas

The Recipe: Oaxacan Mole Negro

  • If you can’t find hazelnuts you can use almonds
  • You can also use cranberries instead of goji berries
  • If you are gluten-free, you can use gluten-free bread instead.
  • You can also serve your cauliflower enmoladas with this almond crema.
  • Chile chilhuacle is a chile native to Oaxaca that is hard to find out of the state. I order mine from here.
  • If you want to make this without oil you can toast all the ingredients in a dry pan, and instead of frying the sauce you can simmer it.
Fork taking a bite of enmoladas away from the plate.
Mole negro enmoladas on a talavera plate and a bright orange tablecloth with flowers behind it.

Oaxacan Mole Negro Cauliflower Enmoladas

Oaxaca’s crown jewel is without a doubt Mole Negro. A dark smoky, slightly bitter, and incredibly rich sauce is paired with cauliflower in the vegan version.
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: mole negro, oaxaca, traditional
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Extra virgin coconut oil
  • 1 cup Chile chilhuacle negro dried
  • 1 cup Chile chilhuacle rojo
  • 1 cup Chile Mulato
  • 1 cup Chile Pasilla
  • ¼ cup Sesame seeds
  • ¼ cup Peanuts raw
  • ¼ cup Pecans raw
  • ½ cup Hazelnuts raw
  • ¼ cup Pepitas pumpkin seeds, raw
  • 2 Corn tortillas
  • 3 Slices whole wheat bread
  • 2 Large red onions
  • 4 Garlic cloves peeled
  • 2 Ripe plantains peeled
  • ¼ cup Goji berries
  • 8 Plum tomatoes cut into dice
  • 10 Tomatillos husks removed, cut into dice
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. Dried oregano
  • 1 tsp.Dried thyme
  • 1 tsp. Ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. Ground turmeric
  • 5 Whole cloves
  • 5 Whole allspice
  • ¼ cup Coconut sugar
  • 1 cup Dark chocolate dairy-free
  • 4 Avocado leaves toasted

To Serve:

  • 10 corn tortillas
  • 1 Large head of cauliflower
  • ¼ cup Coconut oil extra virgin
  • Sea salt
  • 1 tsp. Smoked Paprika
  • 1 tsp. Ground cumin

Pickled Red Onions:

  • 1 Large red onin
  • 2 Limes juiced
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 1 tsp. Oregano

Crema:

  • 1 cup Sunflower seeds hulled, raw
  • 1 ½ cups Water
  • 1 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1 Lime juiced
  • 1 tsp. Nutritional yeast

Instructions

To make the crema:

  • Fill a large glass container with water and add the sunflower seeds. Let them soak overnight in the refrigerator. (Preferably one day before you make the mole.)
  • Drain the seeds.
  • Place the sunflower seeds, water, salt, lime juice, and nutritional yeast in the blender and process until smooth.
  • You can adjust the lime and salt to taste or even add some other spice like jalapeño, ginger, turmeric or nutmeg.

To Make the Mole:

  • Set a large sauté pan to medium-high heat add all the chiles (stems and seeds removed), and toast lightly on both sides. Transfer to a bowl with cold water and set aside for later.
  • In a large pot or wok, add 1 cup of coconut oil and heat to medium heat. Add sesame seeds, peanuts, nuts, hazelnuts, pumpkin seeds, bread, tortilla, onion, garlic, plantain slices, and goji berries. Add them one at a time until they are a deep golden brown, then remove them from the pan, set them aside, and add the next ingredient.
  • Add the diced tomatoes and tomatillos to the pot, season them with salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, oregano, thyme, ground ginger, cumin, clove, turmeric, and allspice, cook until golden brown. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • Place all the fried ingredients plus the drained dried chiles in the blender, and process until smooth. Strain this mixture.
  • Heat a large pot to medium heat and add the remaining 1 cup of coconut oil, fry the sauce for 5 minutes and add the 5 cups of vegetable broth.
  • Add the coconut sugar, chocolate, and avocado leaves (previously toasted). Simmer for 45 min at medium heat, stirring constantly to avoid sticking.
  • While de mole is simmering, cut the cauliflower in small florets and sauté it with a little bit of coconut oil. Seasons with cumin, paprika, and salt to taste. Cover and let it pan steam for about 10 minutes or until tender. Add a little bit of water to the pan if necessary.
  • Prepare the crema (instructions above) and marinate the red onion with the lime juice, water, and oregano.
  • Fill the tortillas (heat them up for a couple of seconds in the microwave so they are easy to fold), and fold them in half.
  • Pour the finished mole
    sauce on top of the folded tortillas and drizzle some crema, and top with
    pickled red onions.

Notes

Chef’s Notes:
• If you can’t find hazelnuts you can use almonds
• You can also use cranberries instead of goji berries
• If you are gluten free, you can use gluten-free bread instead.
• You can also serve your cauliflower enmoladas with this almond crema.

This vegan arroz con leche is creamy, delicious, and easy to make. It is topped with a sprinkle of freshly ground cinnamon and studded with raisins. I love it when it’s served cold on a hot day, but in the winter nothing beats a cup of warm arroz con leche. It’s one of those classic Mexican desserts that you make over and over again.

Milk and rice cooking in a large pot with a cinnamon stick.

Mexican Arroz con Leche

Mexican rice pudding is the perfect combination of milk, sugar, cinnamon, rice, and raisins. Depending on what region of Mexico you grew up in you might have added fresh fruit, orange or lime zest, and even rum.

Raisins added to the pot with the rice and milk.

Did you know that there are many versions of arroz con leche? There is Dominican, Costa Rican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Guatemalan….and the list goes on and on. Most of them are similar but each country has its own variation that makes it unique. In Puerto Rico they use coconut milk, in Spain they add orange zest, in Cuba, they add condensed milk, and in Jamaica, they add allspice or nutmeg.

A wooden spoon full of vegan Mexican rice pudding suspended over a pot.

But it doesn’t matter what country you are from, arroz con leche evokes memories of the smell of cinnamon and a big pot of boiling milk on the stove, and the song, “ Arroz con leche, me quiero casar con un señorita…..”

How to Make Arroz con Leche Vegan

To make this arroz con leche without dairy I did a test between three different types of plant milk: soy milk, oat milk, and almond coconut milk. I used the same recipe for all of them and had some really picky taste-testers (my children) evaluate the results.

Two glass cups of vegan arroz con leche surrounded by cinnamon sticks and raisins.

The Test: Soy milk, Oat Milk or Almond Milk

The clear winner of the taste test was soy, then oat milk, and in the last place was almond-coconut milk. Soy milk resembled cow’s milk the most because of the high-fat content. The one that was made with oat milk was deliciously sweet, but it gave it a yellowish color and it wasn’t as creamy as the soy milk. The almond-coconut milk was creamy but did have a distinctive taste of coconut. My kids loved all of them, but they preferred the soy by far. I know a lot of people don’t do soy, so if you don’t, I recommend the oat milk instead.

A close up of vegan Mexican rice pudding with raisins with the spoon digging in.

The Recipe

  • You can use any plant milk of your choice, but we found that soy was the one that mimicked the taste of cow’s milk the best.
  • Oat milk also makes a yummy arroz con leche.
  • You can add fresh fruit, orange zest, dried fruit, nutmeg, and even vegan condensed milk.
  • I decided to use long-grain rice because it’s what is most accessible, but using short-grain rice will give a creamier result.
Vegan arroz con leche in a glass goblet with a golden spoon inserted into the cup.

Vegan Arroz con Leche

Vegan Arroz con Leche, a traditional Mexican classic made dairy-free with soy milk, cinnamon. and raisins.
5 from 5 votes
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cinnamon, dairyfree, raisins, rice pudding, vegan
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 8 people (Serving size 1/2 cup)
Calories: 311kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Long grain-rice
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick 2 -inch
  • 3 cups Water
  • 4 cups Soy milk
  • ½ – 1 cup Sugar or your sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup of raisins optional

Instructions

  • In a large pot combine water, cinnamon stick, and rice. Bring water to a simmer and simmer slowly for 15 min.
  • Add soy milk to the pot and simmer for 10 more minutes.
  • Add ½ – 1 cup of the sugar (depending on desired sweetness), and simmer for another 10 minutes or until the arroz con leche has reached the right consistency.
  • Remove from the heat, add raisins, and let the rice cool slightly. It will thicken as it cools.
  • Sprinkle with ground cinnamon before serving. Serve warm, or let cool in the refrigerator and serve cold.

Notes

You can use any plant milk of your choice, but we found that soy was the one that mimicked the taste of cow’s milk the best. Oat milk also makes a yummy arroz con leche. You can add fresh fruit, orange zest, dried fruit, nutmeg, and even vegan condensed milk. I decided to use long-grain rice because it’s what is most accessible, but using short grain rice will give a creamier result.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cups | Calories: 311kcal | Carbohydrates: 68g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 68mg | Potassium: 268mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 40g | Vitamin A: 464IU | Vitamin C: 9mg | Calcium: 181mg | Iron: 1mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

This sweet and tender semita bread is designed to be eaten with your morning café de olla or a cold glass of your favorite plant-milk. Piloncillo, raisins, cinnamon, orange zest, and anise are studded throughout the semita, making it an incredibly fragrant and delicious Mexican pan dulce.

Flour, water, yeast in a large stainless steel bowl

Origin of Semita Bread

In the 16th century, a group of Semitic Jews came to the new world, brought by Luis de Carvajal y de la Cueva to settle what is now the state of Nuevo Leon, escaping the Spanish Inquisition that was in full force at the time. This Jewish community colonized the states of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and parts of what is now Texas, and continued to practice their faith in secret. It is thought that this community ate bread during Passover very similar to what we consider semita bread now, with the exception of the piloncillo and raisins. The origin of this bread, however, can be traced back to Spain and Islamic North Africa.

Dough for semita bread mixed in a stainless steel bowl

Semita vs. Cemita

Semita is not the same as cemita, and to confuse things even more sometimes they are both spelled the same. Semita is the sweet bread recipe I have for you today, made with piloncillo, raisins, and sometimes nuts. Cemita is a savory roll, with sesame seeds on top, that is used to make tortas, huge tortas that are very famous in Puebla.

ball of dough in a stainless steel bowl with dough hook in it

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

dough hook stretching the dough to show the texture

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Chihuahua, is the creation of the talented Liliana Arellanes from @veganocosmico and here she is sharing her story with us.

Ball of dough resting in a stainless steel bowl

Liliana’s Story

My Name is Liliana Arellanes; I am from Chihuahua Mexico but have been living in Los Angeles, CA for the last 30 years. My path to Veganism began 25 years ago, for two fundamental reasons, respect, and compassion for all living beings, and respect for myself. Understanding above all, that it is not necessary to kill another living being in order to eat. In this way, we will be nourishing ourselves with Light and not death.

Pecans, raisins, orange zest and pilincillo are added to the dough in the bowl

 

I share the recipe of the famous “CHORREADAS DE PILONCILLO” a typical bread of the region, with a delicious flavor reminiscent of “small town” comfort food. I have added my personal touch, with raisins, nuts, and fragrant orange zest. It is an exquisite handmade sweet bread, with a spongy crumb that you can enjoy fresh out of the oven with a café de olla or a glass of almond milk.

 

dough mixed well and shaped into a ball again

The Recipe: Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  • You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.

four balls of dough on a parchment lined sheet tray

  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.

basket of mexican semita bread and a white plate with slices of semita

a closeup of a piece of semita bread being held in a hand

Three mexican semita bread rolls in a basket on a light blue background

Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

Mexican Semita Bread, studded with pecans, raisins, orange zest and piloncillo.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: pan dulce, semita bread, vegan mexican breakfast
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Resting Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings: 4 Medium sized rolls
Calories: 824kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 ½ cup Bread flour
  • ½ cup Dark brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. Ground anise seed
  • 1 tsp Freshly ground cinnamon (Ceylon)
  • 1/3 cup Coconut butter, about 3 oz
  • 1 ½ cups Warm water
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ cup Raisins, soaked in the juice of one orange
  • 1 tsp. Orange zest
  • 1 tsp. Active dry yeast
  • 3.5 oz Piloncillo (about ½ cup)
  • ½ tsp. Salt

Instructions

  • In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients flour, sugar, anise, cinnamon, yeast, and salt
  • Add the warm water and coconut butter to the bowl and knead.
  • I use the hook attachment on my mixer at medium-low speed for 4-6 minutes or until the dough has come off the sides of the bowl and is stretchy but not sticky.
  • If you don’t have a mixer you can knead by hand for 10 minutes or until you reach the desired consistency.
  • Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a kitchen towel and let rise for an hour.
  • To prepare your piloncillo, place it in a plastic bag, and crush it with the help of a hammer until finely ground.
  • Separate the crushed piloncillo un half. Place half of the piloncillo in a small bowl and mix with 1 tsp. Flour. This will be used to top the semitas before baking.
  • Once the dough is done rising, add the reaming half of the piloncillo, pecans, and orange zest and knead until all the ingredients are mixed evenly throughout.
  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • Divide the dough in four, roll the pieces tightly into rounds, and place on a sheet tray lined with parchment. Press down on the rounds lightly. Brush the rounds with your favorite plant milk, and top with the piloncillo and flour mixture. Press down slightly on the piloncillo topping with your hands.
  • Cover the sheet tray with a kitchen towel and let the dough rise for 20 minutes.
  • Bake for 20 minutes at 350°F.

Notes

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  •  You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.
  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.

Nutrition

Calories: 824kcal | Carbohydrates: 149g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 263mg | Potassium: 381mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 50g | Vitamin C: 3.1mg | Calcium: 82mg | Iron: 3.1mg

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

I’ve been trying to recreate this recipe all of my adult life, and I’ve finally done it! These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too.

These <a target= So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood. Our nanny/housekeeper Polita would make these for us when we were little and we absolutely loved them!

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

Later the recipe was lost and Polita was not one to write quantities down. For years she we asked her to please recreate them, but too much time had gone by, and the recipe was just a long gone memory.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood
Well, amazingly Polita still works with my mom, and has become a sort of lifelong companion part employee, part family. After going vegan, I had completely given up on ever tasting these again, but after interrogating Polita incessantly I finally came up with something good.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

So good, that I am very happy to say, that the sweet smell of these cookies baking in the oven makes the 6 yr old inside me feel loved, safe, and happy. Enjoy!!

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood
The Recipe: Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies

  • To make these gluten-free, use oat flour instead of all purpose flour.
  • You can also use peanut butter or tahini instead of almond butter.
  • You can change up the nuts, use cranberries instead of raisins, or even add chocolate chips.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almond butter oatmeal cookies, vegan oatmeal cookies
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 12 cookies
Calories: 152kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. Ground flax seed
  • 2.5 tbsp. Water
  • ½ cup Grated piloncillo
  • 4 tbsp. Almond butter, unsweetened
  • 1/3 cup Apple sauce, unsweetened
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 ¼ cup. Quick oats
  • 1/2 cup All-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup Chopped raisins
  • ¼ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp, Ground clove
  • 1 tsp. Baking powder
  • ½ tsp. Baking soda

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • In a small bowl, combine flax seed, water, piloncillo, almond butter, apple sauce, and vanilla. Set aside.
  • In a large bowl, combine flour, oats, raisins, salt, cinnamon, clove, baking powder, and baking soda.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, and use a wooden spoon to mix until combined.
  • Drop the dough by heaping tablespoons on a parchment lined sheet tray, 2 inches apart. Flatten cookies slightly with your fingers.
  • Bake for 15 min. or until golden brown.

Notes

To make these gluten-free, use oat flour instead of all-purpose flour. You can also use peanut butter or tahini instead of almond butter. You can change up the nuts, use cranberries instead of raisins, or even add chocolate chips.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookie | Calories: 152kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 5g | Sodium: 138mg | Potassium: 163mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin C: 0.2mg | Calcium: 51mg | Iron: 1.2mg

Nutrition Facts
Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies
Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)
Calories 152 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Fat 5g8%
Sodium 138mg6%
Potassium 163mg5%
Carbohydrates 23g8%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 9g10%
Protein 3g6%
Vitamin C 0.2mg0%
Calcium 51mg5%
Iron 1.2mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.