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These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Sauce pot filled with water, cinnamon, and piloncillo

Champurrado History

Champurrrado ingredients are quite simple but the combination is irresistible. Before the Spanish arrived in Mexico with their cows and their milk, champurrado was made with water.

Glass bowl with fresh masa

It is said that the great Aztec emperor Moctezuma Xocoyotzin enjoyed this beverage which he drank in ceremonial vessels made of gold, sweetened with agave honey, and spiced with a bit of chile.

Glass bowl filled with masa and water

Fray Bernardino de Sahagún documented the consumption of atoll or atolli which was drunk by the indigenous warm or cold, for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes.

Glass bowl with masa and water and a hand mixing it together.

Atole vs Champurrado

So what is the difference between atole and champurrado?? Atole is also a drink from pre-Columbian times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. Champurrado is simply atole with chocolate added to it, in other words, chocolate atole.

Bronze colored colander filled with the remnants of the strained masa

How to Make Champurrado

Making champurrado is quite easy, the piloncillo and cinnamon are simmered in water until completely dissolved, then a Mexican chocolate tablet is added. Once the chocolate has melted into the piloncillo mixture the fresh masa is added. The masa thickens the chocolate creating a thick, sweet, and chocolatey drink. Then everything is frothed with a molinillo and served hot.

Masa liquid being poured into a saucepot

The Recipe: How to Make Champurrado

This authentic Mexican champurrado is made with water instead of milk, just like in pre-Columbian times.

  • If you want to use milk I recommend you use almond-coconut milk.
  • The recipe calls for fresh masa, but if you can’t find it you can use masa harina.
  • I’ve used Ibarra chocolate, but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate.
  • Enjoy!!

Chapurrado in a sauce pot being frothed with a molinillo

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it
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Champurrado

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Course Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword champurrado, chocolate, vegan mexican
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 cups
96 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup Chopped piloncillo (2-4 oz.)
  • 1 Mexican Chocolate disk (I used Ibarra, chopped into 4 pieces)
  • ½ cup Fresh masa for tortillas (nixtamal)

Preparation

  1. Place 3 cups of water, chopped piloncillo, and cinnamon stick in a medium sauce pot and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 1 to 2 minutes or until the piloncillo has completely dissolved.
  2. Add the Mexican chocolate and continue to simmer and stir until chocolate has completely dissolved, about 3 minutes.
  3. In the meantime place the fresh masa in a large bowl and pour 1 cup of water over the masa. Use your hand to dissolve the masa into the water.
  4. Strain the masa liquid, and pour it into the simmering hot chocolate. Stir and froth with a molinillo or whisk.
  5. Simmer for 6 to 8 minutes or until the champurrado has thickened. Serve hot!!

Chef's Notes

If you like your champurrado on the thick side use ¾ cup of fresh masa, but remember, the champurrado will continue to thicken as it cools. I used Ibarra chocolate but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate. If you can’t find fresh masa you can use 3/4 cup of masa harina.

Nutrition Facts
Champurrado
Amount Per Serving
Calories 96 Calories from Fat 27
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 14mg 1%
Potassium 87mg 2%
Total Carbohydrates 14g 5%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 1g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 0.6%
Calcium 4.1%
Iron 11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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I’ve been trying to recreate this recipe all of my adult life, and I’ve finally done it! These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too.

These <a target= So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood. Our nanny/housekeeper Polita would make these for us when we were little and we absolutely loved them!

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

Later the recipe was lost and Polita was not one to write quantities down. For years she we asked her to please recreate them, but too much time had gone by, and the recipe was just a long gone memory.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood
Well, amazingly Polita still works with my mom, and has become a sort of lifelong companion part employee, part family. After going vegan, I had completely given up on ever tasting these again, but after interrogating Polita incessantly I finally came up with something good.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

So good, that I am very happy to say, that the sweet smell of these cookies baking in the oven makes the 6 yr old inside me feel loved, safe, and happy. Enjoy!!

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood
The Recipe: Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies

  • To make these gluten-free, use oat flour instead of all purpose flour.
  • You can also use peanut butter or tahini instead of almond butter.
  • You can change up the nuts, use cranberries instead of raisins, or even add chocolate chips.

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too. So what makes these almond butter oatmeal cookies so special? I’m glad you asked. This is one of my favorite recipes from my childhood
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Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies

These piloncillo almond butter oatmeal cookies are the perfect sweet treat, and they just so happen to be vegan too.

Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword almond butter oatmeal cookies, vegan oatmeal cookies
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 12 cookies
152 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. Ground flax seed
  • 2.5 tbsp. Water
  • ½ cup Grated piloncillo
  • 4 tbsp. Almond butter, unsweetened
  • 1/3 cup Apple sauce, unsweetened
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 ¼ cup. Quick oats
  • 1/2 cup All-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup Chopped raisins
  • ¼ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp, Ground clove
  • 1 tsp. Baking powder
  • ½ tsp. Baking soda

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. In a small bowl, combine flax seed, water, piloncillo, almond butter, apple sauce, and vanilla. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine flour, oats, raisins, salt, cinnamon, clove, baking powder, and baking soda.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, and use a wooden spoon to mix until combined.
  5. Drop the dough by heaping tablespoons on a parchment lined sheet tray, 2 inches apart. Flatten cookies slightly with your fingers.
  6. Bake for 15 min. or until golden brown.

Chef's Notes

To make these gluten-free, use oat flour instead of all-purpose flour. You can also use peanut butter or tahini instead of almond butter. You can change up the nuts, use cranberries instead of raisins, or even add chocolate chips.

Nutrition Facts
Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies
Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)
Calories 152 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5g 8%
Sodium 138mg 6%
Potassium 163mg 5%
Total Carbohydrates 23g 8%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 9g
Protein 3g 6%
Vitamin C 0.2%
Calcium 5.1%
Iron 6.5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Piloncillo Almond Butter Oatmeal Cookies
Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)
Calories 152 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5g 8%
Sodium 138mg 6%
Potassium 163mg 5%
Total Carbohydrates 23g 8%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 9g
Protein 3g 6%
Vitamin C 0.2%
Calcium 5.1%
Iron 6.5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

What is capirotada? Well, according to google it’s Mexican bread pudding, but that’s not quite right. It differs greatly from American bread pudding because it does not have a custard base. It is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo, cinnamon, and clove syrup, then layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and toasted coconut. Traditionally it contains cheese, but for the vegan version I have simply omitted it. Piloncillo is unrefined whole cane sugar, and it has a very unique flavor.

This recipe for vegan capirotada is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo-cinnamon syrup layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and coconut.

This vegan capirotada (Mexican bread pudding) screams it’s Friday in lent. I realize it’s Thursday, but you know how it is when you have three kids demanding every minute of your attention. The other thing you should now is that my husband hates this dessert. Maybe hate is too strong a word, let’s just say he dislikes it very much. Though, I know many of you would agree that this is a dessert Mexicans hold close to their hearts, because it most likely reminds us of a special person who would make it without fail during lent.

This recipe for vegan capirotada is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo-cinnamon syrup layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and coconut.

Easter is right around the corner, and I’ve kind of been procrastinating like I always do. Also this year Karina’s birthday is on Easter. Any ideas for a vegan Easter-birthday party menu?

This recipe for vegan capirotada is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo-cinnamon syrup layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and coconut.

The Recipe: Vegan Capirotada

  • You can refrigerate the leftovers and eat it hot or cold.
  • If you cannot find bolillos feel free to use a baguette instead.
  • Toast the bread very lightly.
  • Feel free to add vegan cheese if you like. Enjoy!

This recipe for vegan capirotada is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo-cinnamon syrup layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and coconut.

This recipe for vegan capirotada is toasted bread soaked in a piloncillo-cinnamon syrup layered with bananas, peanuts, raisins and coconut.
4.34 from 3 votes
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Vegan Capirotada

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 5 Bolillos, large, stale, cut into 3/4 inch slices
  • 8 oz Piloncillo (1 cone)
  • ½ Ceylon Cinnamon stick
  • 4 cups Water
  • 2 Cloves, whole
  • 2 Bananas, sliced into rounds
  • ½ cup Raisins
  • ½ cup Roasted peanuts
  • ¼ cup Coconut, shredded, toasted, unsweetened
  • 2 tbsp. Sprinkles

Preparation

  1. Turn on oven broiler on high.
  2. Place sliced bread on a sheet tray and place under broiler 1 -2 min. or until bread is golden brown.
  3. Flip the pieces of bread over and repeat the process. Remove from oven and set aside.
  4. Preheat oven to 350F
  5. In a small sauce pot, bring water, piloncillo, clove, and cinnamon to a boil. Turn down to a simmer and stir until the piloncillo has dissolved. Strain and place liquid back into the pot.
  6. Add the raisins, and ¼ cup of the roasted peanuts to the liquid and bring back up to a simmer. Take off heat and set aside.
  7. Line the bottom of an 8 X 8 square pan with a layer of bread. Pour ¼ of the liquid over the bread and cover with banana slices, raisins, and peanuts. Add another layer of bread and repeat the process. You should be able to fit 3 layers of bread.
  8. When the final layer of bread has been laid down, pour the remaining liquid on top and cover with banana slices, toasted coconut, ¼ cup of remaining peanuts, and some sprinkles.
  9. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 15 to 20 min. or until syrup is absorbed. Remove from oven and let rest for 20 min. then serve

Chef's Notes

Refrigerate leftovers. Can be eaten hot or cold. If you cannot find bolillos use baguette or french bread.

 

I have done it! After three failed attempts, here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. Ok, I might be a little too excited about this one, but hear me out. This is my favorite pan dulce, you can ask any of my family members, and they will be sure to tell you I have eaten many marranitos in my life! A marranito is a Mexican pastry shaped like a piggy. It can be soft like a sweet bread or more on the hard side like a cookie. This version is more like a pastry than a cookie. It is made with a combination of whole wheat and white flour and infused with a piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon syrup.

Here is the best vegan marranito (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

It took me so long to get the recipe right because I wanted it to be low-fat. I tried substituting the fat with beans and the result was as weird as it sounds. Then I tried substituting the fat with apple sauce and added a flax-egg, which was a big mistake because they turned out super gummy. I finally gave up and went with the apple sauce and 2 tbsp. of oil. I am pretty happy with the result. They taste just as they should, so much so, that the kids ate them so fast I hardly had time to photograph them. We dunked them in the thickest Mexican hot chocolate.

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

School starts this week in Hawaii and we are not ready for summer to end. After many weeks of deliberation we have decided to homeschool. We did not make this decision lightly, but I think this is the best choice for us right now. I am terrified and hopeful at the same time. We are getting everything set up and we should be ready to go in the next few weeks. The good thing is that we still have a lot of Hawaii to explore, so that will keep us very busy.

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

The Recipe: The Best Vegan Marranitos

I recommend eating the marranitos while they are still warm out of the oven and dunking them in hot chocolate or coffee. If you would like to make these with fat you can substitute the amount of apple sauce with vegan butter or coconut oil. Enjoy!

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

Here is the best vegan marranito (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.
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Marranitos

Prep Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 25 minutes
Servings 8 large marranitos
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup Water
  • 3/4 cup Piloncillo, 4.5 oz
  • 2 Cloves, whole
  • 1 stick Mexican cinnamon
  • 1 Star anise
  • 1 cup + 2 tbsp. Flour, all-purpose
  • 1 cup Flour, whole wheat
  • 1 tsp. Baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt kosher
  • 1/2 cup Apple sauce
  • 2 tbsp. Vegetable oil

Preparation

  1. Place water, piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and star anise in a medium sauce pot set to medium heat. Simmer slowly and stir until the piloncillo dissolves. Remove from heat and let cool.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the whole wheat and all purpose flours, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  3. Strain the piloncillo syrup into a medium bowl. Add the apple sauce and oil and mix well.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until the dough begin to comes together.
  5. Use your hands to incorporate the dough together and form a ball. The dough will be on the wet side.
  6. Cover in plastic wrap and place in the fridge for an hour or in the freezer for 30 min.
  7. Preheat oven to 350F.
  8. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll out on a floured surface to 1/4 inch thickness.
  9. Use a large pig shaped cookie cutter to cut out the dough and place them on a parchment lined sheet tray.
  10. Reform the dough scraps into a ball and roll out again to cut out more marranitos. Repeat this process until you cannot cut out any more.
  11. Bake for 15 minutes or until the marranitos are golden brown on the bottom.
  12. Remove from oven and let cool slightly.

Chef's Notes

These are best eaten warm out the oven or dunked in hot chocolate or coffee. If you would like to make these with fat substitute the apple sauce with vegan butter or coconut oil.

 

Something strange is happening in our house. Our 6 yr old, Dylan, has been asking what vegan is. My husband is an omnivore, so I cook 3 vegan meals, 3 non-vegan meals and we eat out one day a week. We don’t really use labels with our food, so the kids don’t think about our meals as vegan or non-vegan. They will eat almost anything, as long as it’s good.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

He has been hearing the word vegan a lot though, because of the blog, and my husband constantly asking if something I have prepared is vegan (possibly with a grimace on his face). I don’t want Dylan to think of vegan food as different or worse than other food, so I have been naming some of his favorite foods and letting him know they are vegan. He loves tofu! When he asked me what vegan was, the best explanation I could give him was that it was food that came from plants, not animals. He kind of nodded and moved on to the next distracting thing in his path.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

Now that the WHO (World Health Organization) has stated that processed meats can cause cancer, it is more important than ever to demistify plant-based food and show others, especially our children, how great you can feel from eating it and how delicious it can be.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

The Recipe: Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

This is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. A cinderella pumpkin is cut into thick wedges, and simmered slowly in piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel. Once the pumpkin is soft and tender, it is drizzled in its own syrup. Traditionally it is served with milk, but this version is topped with decadent coconut whipped cream. Enjoy!

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

candied pumpkin (calabaza en tacha)
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Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

Prep Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours
Servings 10 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 small (4 -5 lbs.) Cinderella pumpkin
  • 1 lb. Piloncillo, (2 cones)
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1 Clove, whole
  • 1 strip Orange peel
  • ¾ cup Water

Preparation

  1. Place the piloncillo, water, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel in a large pot or dutch oven set to low heat. Let the piloncillo slowly dissolve, stir frequently.
  2. In the meantime, rinse the pumpkin well to remove any dirt. With a small knife cut a circle around the stem of the pumpkin. Almost like you are carving a jack-o-lantern. Remove the stem and pull out the seeds and flesh attached to it. Leave the rest if the seeds and flesh inside.
  3. Following the natural vertical grooves of the pumpkin, cut it into wedges from top to bottom. The wedges should be about 2 ½ “ wide x 3 “ long. You do not need to remove the seeds, but you can if desired. Score the skin of the pumpkin wedges with a small knife to help them absorb the syrup.
  4. Once the piloncillo has completely dissolved, remove the pot from the heat and layer the pumpkin wedges skin side down on the bottom of the pot. Once you have covered the bottom of the pot completely, add a second layer of pumpkin wedges flesh side down, so that the pumpkin is touching flesh to flesh.
  5. Cover the pot and set it to medium- low heat. Let the pumpkin simmer for 1½ hours. Don’t worry about not having enough liquid in the pot. As the pumpkin cooks it will release a large quantity of water.
  6. Uncover the pot and let simmer for ½ hour more or until the pumpkin is a dark brown color and is completely submerged in the syrup. Take off the heat and let cool.
  7. Serve hot or cold and top with coconut whipped cream. (see note)

Chef's Notes

If you cannot find Cinderella pumpkins, use a sugar pumpkin instead. Here is  a super easy recipe for coconut whipped cream.