Posts

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

Is there a dish more Mexican than mole poblano? For hundreds of years it has been the pride of Mexican gastronomy, but what is mole poblano?? Mole is a traditional Mexican sauce with over 18 different ingredients. It is a not a chocolate sauce!! Though chocolate is one of the ingredients. The combination of flavors is unlike anything you have ever eaten, and the richness and depth of the sauce is remarkable.

Ingredients for mole poblano recipe displayed on a dark wooden board

There are several varieties of mole, but today we will be making mole poblano, which as the name states is from the Mexican state of Puebla. This version is of course vegan! It’s really important to mention this because not all of the mole pastes you can buy at the grocery store or markets are vegan. Some are made with lard and chicken stock, so it’s always best to check the ingredients.

Large stainless steel bowl filled with dry chiles soaking in water

Onions, tomatoes, and garlic simmering in water in a pot for mole poblano recipe

History of Mole Poblano

Mole is a dish with pre-Hispanic roots, mentioned in Bernardino de Sahagún’s General History of Things of New Spain (1569). In the manuscript it is mentioned that a stew was served to Monctezuma made with chilies, tomatoes, and ground pumpkin seeds. Also, the name “mulli” was given to several types of sauces, and it is thought that moles were prepared as an offering to the gods.

nuts, bread, tortillas, sesame seed and spices in a cast iron pan

During colonial times two myths arise about the origin of mole poblano. My favorite is the story of the convent of Santa Rosa de Lima. It is said that mole poblano originated in the convent around 1685 by Sor. Andrea de la Asunción. Sor. Andrea was very famous for her skills in the kitchens of the convent and was asked to make a special dinner for the bishop Don Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz and the viceroy Conde de Paredes and Marques de la Laguna.

Soaked chiles in blender for mole poblano recipe

She selected a variety of ingredients for her special dish, chiles, bitter chocolate, sesame, anise, cloves, almonds, peanuts, and pumpkin seeds. Everything was ground in the metate and mole poblano was born. However, it is unlikely that this story is true, since there is proof of mole’s prehispanic origins, but perhaps this nun added her own special touch to this dish.Pureed chiles in blender

 

Our Vegan Mexico

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Nut sauce in blender

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Puebla, is the creation of Chantall Vigueras of @mamavegetal here she tells you a bit of her story.

Piloncillo, chocolate, and bouillon cubes in a large pot

 

Chantall’s Story

In 2010 vegetarianism came to my life, because I believed that it wasn’t necessary to eat animals in order to live at their expense, but I still consumed fish and cheese without knowing everything that was behind their production. At that time I didn’t know much, but I began learning along the way.  In 2015 Chantall Vegetal was born promoting the philosophy of veganism. I’ve been veganizing and creating dishes for almost five years! My love for cooking, the planet, and life without violence were what prompted me to want to share this lifestyle. I want to encourage and help others include more plant-based foods in their day to day life with my content, which I create with love.

 

Clay pot filled with mole poblano

 Mole Poblano Recipe

  • This recipe is time-consuming but not complicated at all!!
  • The recipe makes mole paste, which you can freeze or save in the fridge for later use. To use the paste all you need to do is add enough vegetable stock to get it to the right consistency and let it simmer for a couple of minutes, then serve.
  • You can make enmoladas with this or serve it over potatoes, chayote, and zucchini with rice.
  • If you want to make this without oil you can toast the ingredients, that were meant to be fried, in the oven until a dark golden Brown.
  • There were some chiles I couldn’t find easily and I purchased these on Amazon: Chile Mulato and chile chipotle.

 

Enmoladas in a clay plate surrounded by mole ingredients

Clay pot filled with mole poblano

Vegan Mole Poblano Recipe and Enmoladas

Is there a dish more Mexican this mole poblano recipe? Mole is a traditional Mexican sauce with over 18 different ingredients!
5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: mole poblano, vegan mexican
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 12 servings
Calories: 394kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Mole Poblano Paste

  • 7 Ancho chiles
  • 6 Mulato Chiles
  • 6 Pasilla Chiles
  • 3 Chipotle chiles dried
  • 1 Onion, small
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 2/3 cup Raisins
  • ¾ cup Raw peanuts, unsalted
  • 2/3 cup Almonds
  • 1/3 cup Pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1/3 cup Sesame seeds
  • 2 Corn tortillas, cut into fourths
  • 1 Bolillo, a couple of days old, sliced
  • 1 Ripe plantain, peeled sliced
  • 1 stick Ceylon cinnamon broken into pieces
  • 3 Whole cloves
  • ½ tsp. Anise seed
  • ½ cone Piloncillo
  • 1 tablet Mexican chocolate (Ibarra)
  • 1 L Water or vegetable stock
  • 2 Vegetable bouillon cubes (optional)
  • 1 tsp. Black peppercorns
  • Olive oil or avocado oil

ENMOLADAS

  • Corn Tortillas
  • 8 oz. Mushrooms, sliced
  • ¼ Onion, thinly sliced

Garnish for Enmoladas

  • Toasted sesame seeds
  • Crumbled tofu
  • Thin onion slices
  • Avocado

Instructions

MOLE POBLANO PASTE

  • Clean, and remove the seeds and stems from the dried chiles. Using a comal or cast iron pan set to médium heat toast the chiles. Be careful not to burn them or the sauce will be bitter. Once they are lightly toasted submerge them in a pot full of boiling wáter and let soak for 20 minutes.
  • While the chiles are soaking, bring a médium pot of water to a simmer and add the tomato, onion, and garlic. Simmer for about 6-7 minutes or until the tomates begin to lose their skins and the onion is tender. Drain and set aside.
  • Once the chiles are soft and pliable, place them in the blender with 1 cup of water or some of the soaking liquid. Blend until smooth. Strain and set aside.
  • Heat a large saute pan to médium-high heat and add vegetable oil. Fry the raisins, pumpkin seeds, peanuts, almonds, tortilla, bolillo, and plantain one at a time until deep golden brown, almost burnt!
  • Place all of the fried ingredients in the blender with the cinnamon stick, clove, anise seed, black peppercorns, and sesame seeds. Add 1 cup of water and blend. Add as much water as necessary to get your blender to process all of the ingredients into a smooth thick sauce. Strain and set aside.
  • In a large pot (preferably clay), set to médium heat, add ½ cup of water, piloncillo, vegetable bouillon and Mexican chocolate. Stir constantly until it dissolves.
  • Add the chile mixture and the nut-bread mixture, and mix well to incorpórate. Season to taste with salt and pepper if needed.
  • Continue mixing constantly with a wooden spoon and bring to a low simmer. Simmer for 15 minutes and recheck seasoning. Let cool in pot. Now it is ready to use or store.

MOLE POBLANO ENMOLADAS

  • Place 1 cup of the mole paste in a médium sauce pot. Add ½ cup of water or vegetable stock and bring to a low simmer. Stir to incorpórate. Add more liquid if necesary to get the right consistency.
  • In a large saute pan, saute the onions and mushrooms until golden brown. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Soften your corn tortillas by heating them briefly in the oven or microwave until the roll easily.
  • Fill the tortillas with the mushroom mixture and roll. Place on a plate and pour mole sauce on top of them.
  • Sprinkle with sesame seeds and top with sliced onions, avocado and crumbled tofu.

Notes

This recipe is time consuming but not complicated at all!!
• The recipe makes mole paste, which you can freeze or sabe in the fridge for later use. To use the paste all you need to do is add enough vegetable stock to get it to the right consistency and let it simmer for a couple of minutes, then serve.
• You can make enmoladas with this or serve it over potatoes, chayote and zucchini with rice. • If you want to make this without oil you can toast the ingredients, that were meant to be fried, in the oven until a dark golden brown.
• There were some chiles I couldn’t find easily and I purchased those on Amazon: chile mulato and chile chipotle.

Nutrition

Calories: 394kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 168mg | Potassium: 795mg | Fiber: 11g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin A: 6590IU | Vitamin C: 13mg | Calcium: 92mg | Iron: 4.1mg

Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

This Mexican hot chocolate ice cream is sweet and creamy with a hint of cinnamon. It might be the combination of my two favorite things Mexican hot chocolate and ice cream. For this recipe I’ve used my new favorite chocolate, Hernán. I found out about Hernan at a local festival here in San Antonio and I instantly fell in love with their all-natural, vegan products.

mexican hot chocolate tablillas in milk

Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is made with stone-ground ORGANIC cocoa beans from a bio-diversified plantation in Chiapas! The chocolate is available in tablillas or shaped into calaveras (chocolate skulls). It has become my favorite chocolates, because in the US it is becoming very hard to find Mexican hot chocolate without artificial flavors or oils.

mexican hot chocolate skulls

 

Plus it’s a local business run by a fellow Mexican and entrepreneur, Isela Hernández  who is crafting these products in partnership with artisan groups and producers in Mexico!

blended mexican hot chocolate for ice cream

I have been experimenting with the chocolate and have made Mexican hot chocolate paletas, so it only seemed natural to try and use it to make ice cream.

I love ice cream and with so many dairy free alternatives on the market it’s not as difficult to find a good vegan ice cream (my favorite brand is Nadamoo). I do wish there were more Mexican or Latino inspired flavors like this Mexican hot chocolate ice cream, or other flavors like jamaica, horchata, arroz con leche, and cajeta.

These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

 

I used to have an ice cream maker, which I loved, but I had to let go of in the move from Hawaii to Texas. I figured I could just buy a new one instead of paying to ship the one I had, but then I never did. So I have made this recipe no-churn, but if you have an ice cream machine you can use it as well.

The Recipe: Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate Ice Cream

  • I tried several different types of milk for this and my favorite was almond-coconut or soy.
  • I have added avocado for creaminess, but don’t worry the taste blends in perfectly with the chocolate.
  • You can use the sweetener of your choice.
  • If you have an ice cream machine, cool down the chocolate mixture then add to your machine. You can skip the steps 4,5 and 6
  • Enjoy!!

Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate Ice Cream

This Mexican hot chocolate ice cream is sweet and creamy with a hint of cinnamon. It is also no-churn and dairy free!!
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chipotle pasta, vegan pastas, ice cream, mexican hot chocolate, no-churn
Prep Time: 10 minutes
1 day
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4 servings (1 quart)
Calories: 247kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablets (tablillas) Hernan Mexican chocolate
  • 2 cups Almond-coconut milk unsweetened
  • 1 Avocado ripe, cut in half, flesh removed
  • ¼ cup Maple syrup

Instructions

  • Bring the coconut-almond milk to a very low simmer over low heat. Add chocolate tablets, and stir with a whisk or molinillo.
  • Once the chocolate has dissolved pour it in a container and let it cool completely in the fridge or freezer.
  • Place the chocolate mixture, avocado, and maple syrup in the blender, and puree until smooth.
  • Pour into ice trays and freeze overnight.
  • The following day unmold the cubes and place in the food processor. Process until smooth (hold on to your food processor because it’s going to shake!)
  • Eat right away and enjoy!!

Video

Notes

  • I tried several different types of milk for this and my favorite was almond-coconut or soy.
  • I have added avocado for creaminess, but don't worry the taste blends in perfectly with the chocolate.
  • You can use the sweetener of your choice.
  • If you have an ice cream machine, cool down the chocolate mixture then add to your machine. You can skip the steps 4, 5, 6.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Serving | Calories: 247kcal | Carbohydrates: 33g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 175mg | Potassium: 288mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 27g | Vitamin A: 75IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 178mg | Iron: 0.3mg

 

 

 

Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

Are you a fan of Mexican hot chocolate?? Well you are going to love these Mexican hot chocolate popsicles.  Maybe the thought of eating frozen hot chocolate doesn’t get you excited, but let me change your mind.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon. They are everything that’s good about Mexican chocolate but in paleta form.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

For this recipe I used my new favorite Mexican hot chocolate: Hernán. I found out about Hernan at a local festival here in San Antonio and I instantly fell in love with their all-natural, vegan products.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

Hernán is the real deal, and I’m not talking about adding cinnamon to cocoa powder and calling it Mexican chocolate. I mean real, authentic, Mexican chocolate sourced from Chiapas, and ground with sugar and cinnamon. In fact, the cacao used to make Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is organic and from a biodiversified plantation! I can’t wait to experiment more with Hernán chocolate, maybe I’ll make Mexican chocolate ice cream next.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

I tried several ways of making this recipe, testing out several different plant milks and methods, but I couldn’t get them creamy enough.Doing some research online, I found a couple of recipes that were doing chocolate and avocado popsicles and I thought maybe I should try it.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

I’m not going to lie, I was super hesitant to use avocado in this recipe. I thought it would change the taste too much. Finally I decided to give it a go and I was shocked. The avocado makes this the creamiest chocolate popsicle ever, without any unhealthy animal fats, and it doesn’t affect the flavor at all.

The kids loved them and I hope you like them too!

The Recipe: Mexican Hot Chocolate Popsicles (Paletas de Chocolate)

  • The recipe calls for 1 tablilla per cup of milk, but if you really like dark chocolate I would use 1 1/2 tablillas per cup of milk.
  • You can use any sweetener of choice, maple syrup would be really good with this though.
  • Make sure your avocado is ripe
  • This is the mold that I used to make these.
  • Enjoy!
These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

Mexican Hot Chocolate Popsicles

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon. 
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Prep Time: 20 minutes
5 hours
Servings: 6 popsicles
Calories: 131kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablets (tablillas) Hernan Mexican chocolate
  • 2 cups Almond-coconut milk, unsweetened
  • 1 Avocado ripe, cut in half, flesh removed
  • 2 tbsp. Sugar or maple syrup

Instructions

  • Bring the coconut-almond milk to a very low simmer over low heat. Add chocolate tablets and sugar, and stir with a whisk or molinillo.
  • Once the chocolate has dissolved pour it in a container and let it cool completely in the fridge or freezer.
  • Place the chocolate mixture, avocado, and sugar in the blender, and puree until smooth.
  • Pour into popsicle molds, snap on the lids, and freeze for at least 5 hours.

Notes

• The recipe calls for 1 tablilla per cup of milk, but if you really like dark chocolate I would use 1 1/2 tablillas per cup of milk.
• You can use any sweetener of choice, maple syrup would be really good with this though.
• Make sure your avocado is ripe.

Nutrition

Serving: 1popsicle | Calories: 131kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 110mg | Potassium: 162mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 50IU | Vitamin C: 3.4mg | Calcium: 104mg | Iron: 0.2mg

Are you looking for more paleta recipes?? Check these out

Strawberry Paletas

Coconut Paletas

Cucumer-Chile Paletas

Mango-Chile Paletas

It has taken me some time to finally come up with an acceptable vegan version of Mexican hot chocolate. First we tested different types of Mexican chocolates until we found the best one.  Then we tested different types of plant milks, until finally we did it! This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

We tried 4 different types of plant milks for this recipe: coconut, almond, macadamia, and soy. I chose not to test rice and oat milk, because I thought they would be to thin and watery. The almond milk was our least favorite, which was a surprise, because I thought it was going to be the best one. The flavor was a little bit bitter, the texture thin, but it did foam up really well. Our next least favorite was the coconut milk. The coconut flavor completely overpowered everything, and the texture was almost too fatty. You could feel the fat coating your mouth, and not in a good way. The foam was average. One of our favorites was the macadamia nut milk. The flavor of the macadamia milk was very subtle, and the texture was creamy without being overpowering. The foam was average. Our favorite out of all of them was the soy milk. This was a complete surprise to me. The soy milk really let the chocolate shine through, the texture was just the right amount of creamy, and the foam was thick and bubbly.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

(Just on a side note: The beautiful napkin you see in the picture is from Kari of the site Beautiful Ingredient., a vegan blog focused on bringing in more plant- based meals into your daily life. The napkins are handmade and vegan. You can also find coasters, pot holders, and dishcloths. You can find them on her site or on her shop on Food52.)

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

The family and I are still enjoying time at my parents’ house and we are having a blast. Christmas and New Years was great, I didn’t realize how much I really missed them, and how far away Hawaii really is. It’s time to get back to work though, and I’ve been busy trying to find the best spot to take pictures and start developing new recipes. I didn’t make any New Years resolutions this time, instead I chose a word to keep me motivated the whole year. My word is perseverance: steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success. No matter what this year brings, good or bad, we will persevere. With God’s help of course. How was your holiday?

The Recipe: The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

To make this amazing vegan Mexican hot chocolate we used the TAZA chocolate Mexicano cinnamon tablets, soy milk, and a hand blender to get the foam just right. If you are a traditionalist you can use a molinillo or if you prefer convenience you can use a blender. Serve with these marranitos de piloncillo or these vegan conchas. 

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

0 from 0 votes
Print Pin Rate
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 pckg. (2.7 oz) Taza Chocolate Mexicano, cinnamon
  • 2 cups Soy milk

Instructions

  • In a medium sauce pot, heat the milk over medium heat until just about to simmer.
  • Chop chocolate, and add to pot. 
  • Whisk until the chocolate dissolves. Be careful not to overheat the milk.
  • Remove the pot from the heat and froth with a molinillo, hand blender, or blender. 
  • Serve while hot and frothy. 

Notes

You can find several flavors of Taza Chocolate Mexicano, use your favorite.