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Pineapple Chile Margarita on the Rocks

There’s nothing like a refreshing margarita on a blistering hot summer day. This pineapple chile margarita on the rocks is exactly that, refreshing, slightly sweet, tart, and a bit spicy. The combination of fresh pineapple, pineapple juice, tequila, triple sec, lime juice and chile powder make it hard to have just one. I am happy to be participating in margarita week hosted by holajalapeno.com with this recipe. Click on the link to discover many other margarita recipes that you can test out on your friends this 5 de Mayo.

This pineapple chile margarita on the rocks is refreshing, slightly sweet, tart, and a bit spicy. It's hard to have just one!

I first had this margarita on my honeymoon, of course I was no stranger to the combination of pineapple and chile, but to have it incorporated in one of my favorite drinks was a delightful surprise. It could have been my newlywed bliss, the amazing Four Seasons Punta Mita with its views, beach and service, or even the especially hot sun on that day that made this drink so particularly enchanting. Over the years I have made this pineapple chile margarita over and over again and I figured it’s finally time to share with you.

This pineapple chile margarita on the rocks is refreshing, slightly sweet, tart, and a bit spicy. It's hard to have just one!

I am a bit of a margarita snob. I’m pretty sure all bartenders hate me, because I always specify the quantities and ingredients I would like in my margarita. It goes something like this: ” I would like a margarita please, 2 oz of Don Julio reposado, 1 oz. of triple sec, and 1 oz of fresh lime juice, but please make sure it’s FRESH lime juice, and on the rocks with salt.” After a sure eye roll from the server, and my husband’s stare of embarrassment (or maybe it’s pride), most of the time I get the exact margarita I want. I just cannot swallow another taste of margaritas made with sour mix or fake lime juice. I told you I was a snob!

This pineapple chile margarita on the rocks is refreshing, slightly sweet, tart, and a bit spicy. It's hard to have just one!

The Recipe: Pineapple Chile Margarita on the Rocks

I prefer my margaritas with a salt rim and on the rocks, but if you would like to make this frozen, just blend the whole think up. Enjoy!

This pineapple chile margarita on the rocks is refreshing, slightly sweet, tart, and a bit spicy. It's hard to have just one!
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Pineapple Chile Margarita on the Rocks

Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 drinks
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 Lime, cut into quarters
  • 1/2 cup (4 fl oz.) Tequila of your choice, ( I like Corralejo)
  • 1/4 cup (2 fl oz.) Cointreau or triple sec
  • 1/4 cup (2 fl oz.) Lime juice, fresh
  • 1/2 cup (4 fl oz.) Pineapple juice
  • 1/4 cup Chopped pinapple, fresh
  • 1 tsp. + 1/4 cup Tajín chile powder (see note)
  • 2 cups Ice cubes or crushed ice

Preparation

  1. Place the ¼ of a cup of Tajín chile powder on a small flat plate. 

  2. Take one quarter of a lime and rub it along the edges of the two glasses you will be serving your margarita in. Immediately place the rims of the glasses on the plate with the chile and twist to coat. 

  3. Combine the tequila, Cointreau, lime juice, pineapple juice, chopped pineapple, 1 tsp. of Tajín chile powder, and 1 cup of ice. Stir to blend well.

  4. Divide the remaining one cup of ice between the two glasses and pour margarita mixture over. 

  5. You can garnish with a wedge of pineapple dipped in chile powder

Chef's Notes

You can find Tajín chile powder at your local grocery store or at the nearest Mexican market.

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Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

What can I say about vegan cheese? I don’t like it. I’m sorry, but I just don’t. Maybe it’s because I was a passionate cheese lover before going vegan. Oh did I love cheese! The stinkier the better. The vegan versions of cheese just don’t live up to my expectations, so I prefer to do without it. However, I decided to give it a try once more with this macadamia nut queso fresco, because you can’t drink a good glass of wine without cheese.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

The Recipe: Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

This cheese is perfect for a fruit and jam cheese plate, but also topped with a chipotle-pineapple salsa and some chips. The texture is light and easily spreadable. It has a touch of sweetness, but is savory in all the right ways.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

The best part of it is that it is so easy to make. First you soak the macadamia nuts in water overnight. The following day you grind them in the food processor with garlic, oil, salt, and a bit of lime juice. This makes a sort of paste with the consistency of ricotta cheese. You wrap this paste in cheese cloth, squeeze out the excess liquid and leave in the fridge overnight. That’s it, your cheese is ready to eat.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

 

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

macadamia-nut-queso-fresco5
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Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 1 day
Total Time 1 day 25 minutes
Servings 3 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

Queso Fresco

  • 1 cup Macadamia nuts, raw
  • 1 clove Garlic, peeled
  • 1 tsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • 1 tbsp. Olive or vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp. Water
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 piece cheesecloth

Chipotle Pineapple Salsa

  • 1 Tomato, large
  • 1/4 Onion, white
  • 1 clove Garlic, unpeeled
  • ¼ cup Chopped pineapple
  • 1 Chile chipotle adobo (1 pepper)
  • 1 tbsp. Cilantro, chopped

Preparation

  1. For the queso fresco: soak the macadamias in water at room temperature overnight. The following day, drain the nuts and place in a food processor with the garlic, lime juice, oil, water, and salt.
  2. Process 1-2 minutes or until the nuts turn into a paste that resembles ricotta cheese. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  3. Wet a large piece of cheesecloth, approximately 12” X 12”. Place the paste in the center and a form it into a ball by gathering the edges of the cheesecloth around the cheese.
  4. Twist the top edges of the cheesecloth to tighten, give shape, and get rid of excess water in the cheese. Place the cheese bundle on a plate and let sit overnight in the refrigerator.
  5. The next day unwrap your cheese and serve.
  6. To make the salsa: boil water in a small saucepot. Drop tomato in and lower heat to a simmer. Simmer for 3-4 minutes or until the tomato begins to soften.
  7. While the tomato is simmering, set a large sauté pan to medium-high heat. Place the onion and garlic in the pan and let the high heat char them for 2 minutes on each side. Remove from pan, peel the garlic, and place them both in the blender.
  8. Remove the tomato from the water and add to the blender. Add the chipotle, cilantro, and pineapple to the blender and process until you reach the desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Chef's Notes

If you cannot easily find raw macadamia nuts, you can substitute with blanched almonds.

 

 

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Mango Chile Paletas

After packing all our belongings in less than two weeks we drove across the country and finally reached South Carolina. Well, I didn’t, my husband did! I’m spending some time at my parents’ house in Mexico, where the munchkin and I are being spoiled silly, while the hubby is finding a place to live. (Thanks babe!) I have written several posts about my hometown of Acuña, taken lots of pictures, and shared recipes, so this time I don’t have much to show you. It really is a small town.

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

There is one thing in particular that I greatly enjoy when I come here in the summer, the abundance of mango. The variety most commonly available here is the ataulfo. It is an oblong shaped, yellow-skinned, mango that is known for its sweet and buttery flesh. Its skin is slightly thicker than other varieties, but its seed is thinner than most.

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

You can find them at your local Mexican grocery store, Costco, or Sam’s Club. They are in season from March to July. Ataulfo mangoes turn from green to yellow as they mature. When you buy a mango make sure it is not bruised or over-ripe. If you can only find green mangoes, just let them mature at room temperature. An ataulfo mango is ready to eat when the skin is golden-yellow and the flesh is soft to the touch. Once they are ripe, store in the refrigerator for up to five days.

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

In Mexico, ataulfo mangoes are served on street carts with lime and powdered chile, in salads, salsas, and savory seafood dishes. There are also mango popsicles, mango candy, dried mango slices covered in chile, mango cakes, and pastries.

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

The Recipe: Mango Chile Paletas

I have created two popsicle recipes for you. The first one is sugar-free, super easy, and kid approved. The trick is to use really ripe mangoes. The second popsicle uses simple syrup as a sweetener, and has key lime juice and chile powder to make it fit for grownups. Enjoy!

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Mango Chile Paletas

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Total Time 5 hours 10 minutes
Servings 4 popsicles
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups Mango peeled, diced
  • 1/4 cup Simple syrup*
  • 1/4 cup Water
  • 2 tbsp. Key lime juice
  • 1 tbsp. Tajin chile powder

Preparation

  1. Combine all ingredients in blender and process until smooth.
  2. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze for at least 5 hours before unmolding.

Chef's Notes

To make simple syrup bring ¼ cup of sugar, and a ¼ of a cup of water to a simmer, until all the sugar dissolves. Let cool completely.
Tajin chile powder can be found at most Mexican grocery stores and some Wal-Mart´s.

 

Sugar-Free Mango Popsicles

 Yield: 4 popsicles

Time: 15min + 5 hrs.

 Ingredients:

Mango, peeled, diced1 ¼ cups
Water1/3 cup

Preparation:

  1. Combine ingredients in blender and process until smooth.
  2. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze for at least 5 hours before unmolding.

Chef´s  Notes:

Use really ripe mangoes for extra sweetness.

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

 

This recipe for mango chile paletas or paletas de mango con chile, combines mango, lime juice and chile powder for a sweet and spicy treat.

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Prickly Pear Margarita

Have I mentioned I love tequila? I know some of you must be fighting back your gag reflex just thinking about tequila, but not me. Tequila and I go way back, but that’s another story, preferably one told while drinking tequila. After you try this prickly pear margarital you might reconsider your aversion to tequila, at least I hope you do.

This recipe for prickly pear margarita is so good it will change your whole perspective on tequila. The prickly pears won't disappoint.

Prickly pear fruit is native to Mexico and South America, but it can be found in France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Egypt, and parts of the Middle East. It is known for its thick spiny skin and soft, sweet, & watery interior. There are many varieties, but the most well known are green, red, yellow, brown and pink.  It’s the perfect summer fruit, it tastes like a weird combination of pear, cucumber, watermelon and pineapple. It has only one monstrous defect, besides the tiny spines that line its exterior, the flesh of the fruit is riddled with seeds. It is commonly used to make drinks, candy, or jelly.

This recipe for prickly pear margarita is so good it will change your whole perspective on tequila. The prickly pears won't disappoint.

You can find them at your local Mexican or Hispanic market. I found them at my favorite grocery store, Crown Valley Market Place in Mission Viejo or you can find them at El Nopal Market in San Juan Capistrano. They are in season from early spring to late fall. To prepare them, use a paring knife to cut off both ends of the fruit and make a 1/4 of an inch deep cut lengthwise. Please, please, please wear gloves when working with this fruit. Even though you can find them without the large spines at the store, the tiny and almost hair like spines remain and can get lodged in your flesh. They truly are tiny! Place your finger in between the flesh and the outer skin and simply pull back, the outer layer should come off easily. You can store them in your refrigerator for up to a week or at room temperature if you are going to eat them in one or two days.

This recipe for prickly pear margarita is so good it will change your whole perspective on tequila. The prickly pears won't disappoint.

One of the wonderful benefits of living in SoCal is that a wide variety of tequila is available at the grocery store, liquor store, and neighborhood bar. We usually drink Corralejo, Don Juilo, or Clase Azul, but this time we used Cazadores which is a great option for those who don’t want to spend a lot of money. As for margaritas, I’m happy to see more bars have stopped using sour mix and creating their own flavored syrups and liquors. Did you know, margaritas in Mexico are made with lime juice, tequila, and triple sec or Cointreau? That’s it! I wish I had better pictures to show you; the color of this fruit is amazing, almost neon. This is officially the most tested recipe on this blog:)

This recipe for prickly pear margarita is so good it will change your whole perspective on tequila. The prickly pears won't disappoint.

 

 

The Recipe: Prickly Pear Margarita

I usually like my margaritas on the rocks in a salt rimmed glass, but the sweetness of the prickly pear called for this to be a frozen version. The prickly pear is full of seeds, make sure strain the pureed mixture. Enjoy!

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Prickly Pear Margarita

Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 2 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Red prickly pears, peeled
  • ¾ cup Tequila, reposado
  • ½ cup Cointreau,
  • ¼ cup + 1 tbsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • Ice As Needed

Preparation

  1. Blend prickly pears on low for 60 seconds. Then blend on high for 30 seconds. Strain. Set liquid aside.
  2. Pour tequila, Cointreau, lime juice, and prickly pear juice in blender. Add ice and blend on high.
  3. Serve in two salt rimmed glasses.

 

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The Best Sangrita Recipe

I love tequila!! I really do, and I hate the negative reputation is has in this country. I’ve been drinking tequila since I was 15 yrs old, with adult supervision of course. My parents decided it was best to teach me how to drink tequila properly, before I turned 18 and went out into the world. I never got drunk off of it, at least not until college, which I totally blame on you eager American college kids. I’ll spare you the drunk college stories for fear of embarrassing myself and others involved. Needless to say, I almost gave up tequila. Thankfully my mom started sending me bottles of sangrita to chase my tequila with, which reminded me that tequila, good tequila, is meant to be sipped and enjoyed. Sangrita is the best tequila chaser you’ll find. It is a combination of hot chiles, orange juice, onion, tomato juice, and just a touch of sugar. You can buy it pre-made, I recommend Viuda de Sanchez, or you can make it yourself.

The best sangrita recipe is spicy, sweet, and savory. It is the best chaser to any tequila. A vegan recipe.

Now, let me introduce you to the many wonderful ways in which Mexicans drink their tequila. First there’s the “bandera” or flag, it consists of 3 shots, one of lime juice, one of tequila, and one of sangrita. It is meant to be sipped but can also be shot. It’s called a flag because of the colors reflect those of the Mexican flag: green, white, and red. The shot glasses are not your regular shot glasses either. They are known as “caballitos” or little horses. If you would like to know why, you can visit the Mexican Academy of Tequila for some interesting facts. All you really need to know is that while a regular shot glass fits one fluid ounce of liquor, the “caballito” fits one and a half. Another way to drink tequila is with lime and salt, lick the space between your thumb and your forefinger, add some salt, lick salt, take shot, and suck on a lime. Please don’t call it training wheels, it drives me crazy, yes it’s supposed to lessen the harshness of the alcohol, but tequila shouldn’t be harsh. Surprised? This leads me to the final way of drinking tequila, which is, served in a snifter and sipped.

The best sangrita recipe is spicy, sweet, and savory. It is the best chaser to any tequila. A vegan recipe.

All of these ways of drinking tequila would be greatly improved if you invest in a good tequila. Try Corralejo or Don Julio Blanco for margaritas, the “bandera”, and the salt-shot-lime version, or for any other mixed drink. Don Julio (my lover), also comes in Reposado, Anejo, and 1942. Don Julio 1942 is for sipping, and while quite expensive you should definitely try it t least once. If you’re looking for a surprisingly smooth tequila try Clase Azul, plus it comes in a really unique bottle. I hope this helps and maybe persuades you to try tequila one more time before vowing never to touch it again.

The Recipe: The Best Sangrita Recipe

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Sangrita

Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 quart
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Tomato juice
  • 1 1/2 cups Orange juice, fresh
  • 1/2 cup Lime juice, fresh
  • 2 tsp, Onion white, large, minced
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce, vegan
  • 4 tsp. Valentina, Mexican hot sauce

Preparation

  1. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients, whisk them together, and season.
  2. Refrigerate.

Chef's Notes

Serve cold. The quality of the sangrita depends on the quality of the tomato juice, so get a good one.