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This vegan Matamoros style seafood stew is a spicy, tangy, and hearty stew of oyster mushrooms, chickpeas, hearts of palm, and corn simmered in a chile-tomato broth. It is served with chopped cilantro, a splash of lime juice, and tostadas.

Dulse flakes, garlic, oregano, and chile powder in a large pot

This stew is somewhat similar to the caldo de siete mares, which is a classic Mexican seafood soup. This version besides being vegan, is delicious and full of a wide variety of vegetables. It gets its fishiness from dulse flakes, which are sun-dried seaweed flakes rich in fiber, protein, vitamin B12, and omega-3.

(Matamoros is a city in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. It is a border town with Brownsville, TX and it is located 28 miles from the coast of the gulf of Mexico.)

Tomato and guajillo chiles added to the pot with the dulse flake mixture

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Tamaulipas, is the creation of the talented chef Eddie Garza from @theeddiegarza and here he is sharing his story with us.

Eddie’s Story:

Every November I celebrate my veganiversary. This year, I’m celebrating my Sweet Sixteen! It’s been an amazing journey.

I was born and raised in the South Texas border town of Brownsville, right across the Rio Grande River from Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico. My hometown slogan is “On the border, by the Sea.” And as the slogan suggests, Mexican style seafood a big part of the culture. Unfortunately, chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease caused by obesity is also a big part of the culture.

Blender container with blended chile sauce for vegan seafood stew

Like many of my classmates, I was a chubby kid. And every year I got bigger and bigger. By the time I finished high school, I weighed close to 250 pounds. For a 5’7” 18 year-old, that’s a lot. But it didn’t stop there. I finally maxed out at 310 pounds and I was always sick and injured (because my ankles couldn’t keep up with my rapid weight gain). I hit my rock bottom when I was diagnosed as prediabetic right after college.

Pot filled with sauteed mushrooms, carrots, celery, and onion

Thankfully, things turned around for me after meeting a new friend who taught me how to feed myself better. I began eating less of the fatty meat-centric meals that were harming my body and eating more fruits and vegetables. After 5 years of trying to go fully vegan, I finally did it. And I lost 150 pounds along the way. Now, 16 years later, I feel better than ever! And what’s really amazing is that I still get to enjoy all the same flavors I loved growing up on the SoTex-Mex border in a healthy plant-based way.

vegan seafood stew in a large pot. A ladle dunk in to show the stew

Today, I’m delighted to share a veganized version of one of our fall family favorites. It’s a Matamoros style seafood stew that features hearts of palms, oyster mushrooms, and chickpeas instead of sea animals. What gives this lip-smacking stew it’s sea-like flavor is dulse seaweed, which I love using for all my plant-based seafood dishes. I hope you love it as much as I do. ¡Buen provecho!

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro

The Recipe: Matamoros Style Seafood Stew

  • If you can’t find dulse flakes, you can use ground up nori seaweed.
  • Potatoes make a great addition to this!
  • You can also add zucchini or chayote.
  • Any mushroom would do, but preferably try to find oyster mushrooms.
  • Serve with tostadas.

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro
5 from 1 vote
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Matamoros Style Seafood Stew

This vegan Matamoros style seafood stew is a spicy, tangy, and hearty stew of oyster mushrooms, chickpeas, hearts of palm, and corn simmered in a chile-tomato broth. It is served with chopped cilantro, a splash of lime juice, and tostadas.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free, veganmexican
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 8 people
207 kcal
Author Eddie Garza

Ingredients

  • 8 Dried guajillo chiles, soaked, seeded and chopped
  • 2 tbsp. Vegetable oil divided
  • 4 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ tbsp. Dried Mexican oregano
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • ½ tsp. Black pepper
  • 2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 2 tsp. Ancho chile powder
  • 1 tsp. Chipotle powder
  • 2 tbsp. Dulse flakes
  • 4-5 Roma tomatoes roasted and peeled
  • 8 ounces Tomato sauce
  • 2 Carrots diced medium
  • 1 Medium onion diced medium
  • 3 Stalks celery diced medium
  • 8 ounces Oyster mushrooms separated
  • 4 cups Vegetable stock
  • 14 ounces Hearts of palm, half diced in rings, half julienned
  • 4 ears Fresh corn on the cob broken into halves
  • 1 ½ cups Chickpeas, cooked
  • ½ cup Cilantro, chopped (garnish)
  • Lime wedges (garnish)

Preparation

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large soup pot, and sauté the garlic, oregano, salt, pepper, cumin, ancho chile powder, chipotle powder, and dulse flakes for 3 minutes. Add the rehydrated guajillo chiles, tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.
  2. Purée the mix (the soup base) with an immersion blender (or in batches with a conventional blender). Transfer the soup base to a bowl and set aside.
  3. In the same pot, heat 1 tablespoon of oil on medium heat and sauté the carrots, onions, celery and mushrooms for 4 minutes. Return the soup base to the pot. Add the vegetable stock, and cook for 10 minutes.
  4. Add the hearts of palm, corn on the cob and chickpeas. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
  5. Serve hot, garnished with cilantro and lime wedges.

Chef's Notes

  • If you can’t find dulse flakes, you can use ground up nori seaweed.
  • Potatoes make a great addition to this!
  • You can also add zucchini or chayote.
  • Any mushroom would do, but preferably try to find oyster mushrooms.
  • Serve with tostadas.
Nutrition Facts
Matamoros Style Seafood Stew
Amount Per Serving
Calories 207 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5g 8%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Sodium 930mg 39%
Potassium 1487mg 42%
Total Carbohydrates 35g 12%
Dietary Fiber 7g 28%
Sugars 16g
Protein 7g 14%
Vitamin A 96.3%
Vitamin C 17.5%
Calcium 8.3%
Iron 24.4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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Atapakua, this spicy Mexican vegetable stew from Michoacan is simmered in a smoky chile guajillo sauce made with pumpkin seeds, fresh corn, spearmint, garlic, and tomato.  It is a unique combination of very Mexican flavors and spices. If you have never tried it, you are in for a treat!!

 ingredients for atapakua, corn, potato, mushrooms, tomato, chile guajillo, pumpkin seeds, chayote, and zucchini

What is Atapakua??

Atapakua is a traditional dish from Michoacan that has prehispanic origins, prepared for hundreds of years by the Purepecha indigenous people. It is thought that before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores atapakua used only plant-based ingredients like chilacayote, its flowers, and other vegetables, and legumes. After the conquest, animal products were added to the dish.

diced sweet potato, chayote, and zucchini on a sheet tray for atapakua

In Michoacan, you can find different variations of atapakua. It can be prepared with tomatoes or tomatillos, making it green or red in color. Atapakua is notable for its use of fresh corn or masa to thicken the sauce giving it an earthy flavor.

sauteed mushrooms in a cast iron pan

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

roasted ingredients for atapakua in a blender

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Michoacan, is the creation of Cynthia Estrada of @nutricionycocina, and here she with a message.

Cynthia’s Message:

They say that the Earth needs to be saved. Before existing as men, women or your gender of preference we are human beings, and before that we are animals, just another species. The planet evolves, the species become extinct.

atapakua in a clay cazuela, on a purple table mat, surrounded by tomato, zucchini and mint

I accept the word ecologist to describe me. The reality is that I am just trying to save myself. Earth can exist without humans, but we can’t exist without the earth. So why have I decided to reduce the consumption of animal products in my life and everything that goes with it?? The preservation of my person.

I decided to reduce my consumption of animal products for my health, to improve my existence on this planet, to have more energy, and improve my economy.

bright orange-red sauce for atapakua in a sauce pot

The Recipe: Atapakua – Spicy Mexican Vegetable Stew

  • If you want to prepare this recipe without oil, simply toast the pumpkin seeds and chile guajillo until golden brown in a cast iron pan. Saute the onion and garlic in a little bit of water.
  • You can add zucchini blossoms, fava beans or green beans to add more variety to the dish.
  • If you think sweet potato is too sweet you can use potato instead
  • The sauce is not very spicy since it uses only guajillo chiles, but if you do want it spicy you can add 1-2 serrano chiles.
  • For a deeper smoky flavor, you can roast the tomato on a cast iron pan or under your oven broiler until it has black spots all over, then add it to the blender.
  • The recipe calls for fresh corn, but since corn in the US is so much sweeter than Mexican corn, to make this récipe more authentic tasting use ½ fresh corn and ½ fresh masa. If you do use masa, let the sauce simmer for 15 min.

  atapakua in a clay cazuela, on a purple table mat, surrounded by tomato, zucchini and mint

5 from 1 vote
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Atapakua - Mexican Vegetable Stew

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword atapakua, vegan mexican, vegetable stew
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 2 people
247 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 Sweet potato, peeled, cut into cubes
  • 1 Chayote or chilacayote, cut into cubes
  • 1 Zucchini, cut into cubes
  • 3 Guajillo chiles, seeds and stems removed
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, seeds removed
  • 2 cloves Garlic, peeled
  • ¼ Large white onion, peeled, chopped
  • 10 Pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • ¼ cup Water
  • 1 cup Fresh corn kernels
  • 1 tbsp. Spearmint or mint, chopped
  • 8 oz. Oyster or maitake mushrooms (any mushroom will do)
  • 1 Avocado leaf, dried, crumbled
  • Avocado Oil (Optional)

Preparation

Sweet Potato, Zucchini and Chayote

  1. Pre-heat oven to 450°F for 15 minutes.
  2. Place sweet potato, zucchini, and chayote on a parchment lined sheet tray, season with salt and pepper.
  3. Turn heat down to 350°F and bake for 20 minutes.

Salsa

  1. Heat a large sauté pan to low heat and add 1 tbsp. of oil (if you are oil-free see notes). Add pumpkin seeds and chile guajillo and cook until golden brown, remove from pan and set aside. Add onion and garlic to pan and cook until golden brown (keep garlic whole).
  2. In a small pot, simmer the corn in water until tender, about 2-3 minutes. Strain and reserve ¼ cup of the corn cooking liquid, and 1 tbsp. of corn kernels for garnish.
  3. Place the corn, chile guajillo, pumpkin seeds, onion, garlic, tomato, and ¼ cup of the corn water and blend until smooth.
  4. Add 1 tbsp. of spearmint, season with salt and pepper, and blend again.
  5. Pour the sauce into a medium sauce pot, set to medium-low heat, and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 3-5 minutes, then turn off heat, cover and keep warm.

Mushrooms:

  1. In a large sauté pan set to medium high-heat, sauté the mushrooms until golden brown in avocado oil (oil is optional), about 6-7 minutes.
  2. Season with salt and pepper. Crush the avocado leaf in your hands and sprinkle it over the mushrooms.

To serve:

  1. Place the sautéed mushrooms in a large bowl or cazuela. Add the sweet potato, zucchini, and chayote.
  2. Pour the sauce over the vegetables and stir.
  3. Garnish with corn kernels, and spearmint leaves.
  4. Serve with your favorite beans and corn tortillas.

Chef's Notes

  • If you want to prepare this recipe without oil, simply toast the pumpkin seeds and chile guajillo until golden brown in a cast iron pan. Remove from pan then, char the onion and cook the garlic until golden brown.
  • You can add zucchini blossoms, fava beans or Green beans to add more variety and texture to the dish.
  • If you think sweet potato is too sweet you can use potato instead
  • The sauce is not very spicy since it uses only guajillo chiles, but if you do want it spicy you can add 1-2 serrano chiles.
  • For a deeper smoky flavor, you can roast the tomato on a cast iron pan or under your oven broiler until it has black spots all over, then add it to the blender.
  • The recipe calls for fresh corn, but since corn in the US is so much sweeter than Mexican corn, to make this recipe more authentic tasting use ½ fresh corn and ½ fresh masa. If you do use masa, let the sauce simmer for 15 min.
Nutrition Facts
Atapakua - Mexican Vegetable Stew
Amount Per Serving
Calories 247 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g 6%
Sodium 75mg 3%
Potassium 1473mg 42%
Total Carbohydrates 47g 16%
Dietary Fiber 10g 40%
Sugars 17g
Protein 11g 22%
Vitamin A 235.7%
Vitamin C 56.1%
Calcium 7.6%
Iron 18.1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

I never liked atole as a child, probably because we would have those artificially flavored packets of Maizena atole. This almond atole is something completely different. Almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina combine to make this a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.

Atole is a drink from pre-hispanic times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. It was drank by the indigenous people of Mexico for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water, and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. It is available all year, but is especially popular in the winter months.

Currently, atole is also made with cornstarch, rice flour, oat flour, or barley. Its consistency ranges from thin and milky, to very thick.  It is drank on special occasions like the Day of the Dead, Christmas, baptism, first communions, weddings, and feast days. Tamales and atole is classic pairing and one you should definitely try.

While doing research on atole I happened to find that almond atole is a favorite of my home state, Coahuila. I had never tried it before, so I decided to give it a try. I was pleasantly surprised at how delicious it was, and nothing like the packaged version of atole that you can find at Mexican grocery stores. Like always, I made way too much of it, and saved what we didn’t drink in the fridge. The next day I served it to the kids for breakfast, almost like a porridge, and they ate it all up.

The Recipe: Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. You can buy fresh masa at some tortillerias or Mexican groceries. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well. I haven’t made this recipe too sweet, so feel free to sweeten it up. ¡Enjoy!

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.
3.8 from 5 votes
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Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage
Total Time 25 minutes
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 stick Ceylon cinnamon
  • 1 cup Masa harina, maseca
  • 1 ½ cups Raw Almonds or (1 2/3 cup almond meal)
  • ½-3/4 cup Piloncillo, brown sugar or maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon

Preparation

  1. Heat almond milk in a medium sauce pot, bring to a simmer.
  2. While the milk comes to a simmer, grind the almonds in your blender until they resemble a powder. Set aside.
  3. Dissolve the masa harina in a little bit of water.
  4. Add the masa harina to the almond milk, and mix well.
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes, stirring to make sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.
  6. Add the ground almonds, cinnamon, and piloncillo to the saucepot. Simmer at very low heat for 15 minutes. Stir well.
  7. Serve hot. As it cools it will thicken, so add more almond milk if necessary.

Chef's Notes

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well.

 

 

During the summer I probably make these calabacitas tacos once or twice a week. (Every mom in Mexico makes calabacitas, it is one of the most common side dishes.) They are super easy to make and they utilize all the wonderful summer produce available at the local farmer’s market. Tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stew together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

Traditionally calabacitas tacos are topped with crema and cheese. However, this time I have chosen to use avocado instead, but feel free to use my recipe for almond crema and macadamia nut cheese, or top with your favorite vegan cheese. If you would like to make this a heartier meal you can add baked tofu or your favorite beans.

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

This week we went back to the Dole pineapple plantation to ride the train. The plantation has a little train that takes you on a tour of the plantation fields. The kids were more than happy to ride around on the train and spend time with their dad, and the view was amazingly beautiful. While at the plantation my husband and I were commenting that we were so ready for the summer to be over. There are so many tourists, everywhere, all the time. More than 8 million people visit Hawaii every year! It can get kind of crowded. I expect that around September or October things will slow down a bit, and we can enjoy some quiet time at the beach. Look at me sounding like a local!

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

I am in the process of planning the recipes for the next couple of months, and I want to know what YOU would like to see on the blog. There are many wonderful Mexican recipes that still need to be veganized, so tell me about your favorite Mexican dish or food memory and I will try my best to make it vegan and healthy-ish.

The Recipe: Summer Calabacitas Tacos

This has always been one of my favorite recipes and it is great in tacos, or served over rice with lentil picadillo. Enjoy!

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

Calabacitas tacos are tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stewed together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.
5 from 1 vote
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Summer Calabacitas Tacos

Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Vegetable broth
  • 1 cup Onion, white, finely diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 ears Corn, large, cut into kernels
  • ¼ cup Vegetable stock or water
  • 2 Zucchini, large, cut into dice
  • 2 cups Tomato, diced (fresh or canned)
  • 10 Corn tortillas
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • 1 cup Favorite Salsa

Preparation

  1. In a large heavy bottomed pot, set to medium heat; sweat the onion in 1/4 cup of vegetable broth for 2 to 3 minutes until onion is translucent.
  2. Add corn and garlic and pour in remaining ¼ cup of vegetable broth, cover and let steam until corn is tender, about 3 – 4 minutes.
  3. Uncover, add zucchini and cook for 3-4 minutes, until it begins to soften.
  4. Add tomato and cook for 5 minutes more, or until all the vegetables are tender.
  5. Season to taste, and serve on warm tortillas with avocado slices and salsa.

Chef's Notes

During the summer I probably make these calabacitas tacos once or twice a week. (Every mom in Mexico makes calabacitas, it is one of the most common side dishes.) They are super easy to make and they utilize all the wonderful summer produce available at the local farmer's market. Tender zucchini, ripe tomatoes, sweet corn, and garlic stew together to make a satisfying, finger licking taco.

Traditionally calabacitas tacos are topped with crema and cheese. However, this time I have chosen to use avocado instead, but feel free to use my recipe for almond crema and macadamia nut cheese, or top with your favorite vegan cheese. If you would like to make this a heartier meal you can add baked tofu or your favorite beans.

 

 

 

Today I want to introduce you to a very talented cook, blogger and restauranteur, Douglas Cullen from the blog Mexican Food Journal. Douglas and I met through Food Blogger Pro community and when the opportunity came up for a collaboration I was more than thrilled. Anything to support and promote Mexican food. Douglas has lived in Mexico for over 20 years, and he is the former owner of a restaurant in San Miguel de Allende. His blog Mexican Food Journal aims to teach you and inspire you to cook Mexican food. He is sharing with us a vegan recipe for roasted chile poblano soup or crema de chile poblano.

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are the large fresh chiles that are deep green in color which are available in almost every supermarket. If you have ever eaten chiles rellenos then you have tried poblano chile and if you have never cooked with poblano chiles give this recipe a try. You will love it. Poblanos have a deep flavor but don’t overpower you with chile heat. In Mexico, they are considered a very mild chile but I consider them moderately hot. Typically, roasted chile poblano soup is prepared with heavy cream to give it body and richness but in the recipe it’s the potato that gives it body and richness.

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green

The Recipe: Roasted Chile Poblano Soup

The roasting of the poblano pepper can be done over an open flame or under your oven broiler. The secret is after they are roasted place them in a plastic bag or in a bowl covered with plastic wrap for a couple of minutes to let the steam loosen the skin. Garnish the soup with fried tortillas strips and a couple spoonfuls of corn. Provecho!

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green

Here is a vegan variation on crema de poblano, roasted chile poblano soup served throughout Mexico. Poblano chiles are large, and deep green
3.75 from 4 votes
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Roasted Chile Poblano Soup - Vegan

Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Douglas Cullen

Ingredients

  • 3 Poblano chiles, medium size, about 4 to 5 inches long
  • 1 Waxy potato, medium
  • ½ White onion, medium
  • 1 (12 oz) can White corn
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • 1 tsp. Epazote, Mexican herb
  • 6 Corn tortillas
  • 2 tbsp. Cooking oil
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 6 cups Water

Preparation

  1. Chop the poblano chile, potato and onion
  2. Heat the cooking oil in a pot to medium heat
  3. To the pot add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion starts to turn translucent (about 5 minutes). Stir frequently
  4. Add the potato and continue cooking for another 5 minutes
  5. Add the chiles and ½ of the white corn
  6. Add 5 cups of water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and cook for 20 minutes
  7. In 2 batches, blend the soup until very smooth (about 2 minutes per batch)
  8. Return the soup to the pot and simmer for 20 more minutes
  9. If the soup is too thick, add the remaining cup of water a little bit at a time until the desired consistency is reached.

Preparation - Tortilla Strips

  1. Cut the corn tortillas in half and then slice into ¼ inch wide strips
  2. Preheat ¼ inch of cooking oil in a frying pan to medium hot
  3. Tip: To check to see if the oil is ready, drop 1 tortilla strip into the oil. If the oil starts to bubble the oil is ready
  4. Place the tortilla strips into the hot oil
  5. Every 30 seconds stir the tortilla strips so that they cook evenly
  6. When the tortilla strips have turned Golden Brown they are done
  7. Drain the tortilla strips on paper towels

Serving

  1. Divide the soup into 4 -6 bowls
  2. Heat the reserved corn in the microwave for 45 seconds
  3. Garnish the soup with tortilla strips and 2 spoonfuls of corn

Chef's Notes

It is important to use white corn for this recipe. Yellow sweet corn changes the taste.
This version packs a little heat but the recipe is very flexible. If you prefer a milder soup substitute 1 white potato for 2 poblano chiles.

 

Corn Paletas? What kind of weird sorcery is this? When you think about it a little bit, it makes total sense. We tend to associate corn with savory, but what about corn muffins and corn bread. Corn can also be sweet. Corn is sweet, so why not make paletas out of it.

I didn’t come up with this myself though. Corn is a common flavor in the paleterias of Michoacan and Central Mexico, where you can find ice cream as well as paletas. The first time I had one I was a little thrown off by the visible chunks of corn, but the flavor won me out at the end. Kind of like the first time I had Korean shaved ice with sweet red beans. You will have to make them in order to decide whether you like them or not. One of my kids loved them, and the other hated them.

This recipe for corn paletas takes all the sweet goodness of corn and transforms it into a an icy treat. They are super easy to make.

Cooking Mexican food in Hawaii hasn’t been to difficult. I have been able to find most of what I need at the regular grocery store, but dried chiles eluded me. I had to drive 40 minutes to the one Mexican grocery store in all of Oahu to find them. It turned out to be a little hole in the wall shop, and it became instantly smaller as soon as I brought my two kids in there. They were touching everything and running around like the crazy kids that they are. The lady, who I assume was the owner, was very nice, but I could tell she was worried about her livelihood with my kids in there. I picked up some dry chiles, spices, and some Mexican candy and ran out as quick as I could. It was a hot sticky day, so I bought two Jumex juices for the kids and we sat outside the shop to drink them. What is your favorite paleta flavor?

This recipe for corn paletas takes all the sweet goodness of corn and transforms it into a an icy treat. They are super easy to make.

The Recipe: Corn Paletas

This recipe for corn paletas takes all the sweet goodness of corn and transforms it into a an icy treat, and they are super easy to make. I used almond milk to make these paletas, but you can use coconut milk for a more decadent version. If this is your first time making these I would recommend pureeing the mixture until it is completely smooth and straining it. Once you decide if you like them or not you can play around with the texture. Enjoy!

 

This recipe for corn paletas takes all the sweet goodness of corn and transforms it into a an icy treat. They are super easy to make.

This recipe for corn paletas takes all the sweet goodness of corn and transforms it into a an icy treat. They are super easy to make.
0 from 0 votes
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Corn Paletas

Prep Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 10 paletas
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Corn kernels fresh (about 4 ears)
  • 3 cups Almond milk
  • 3/4 cup Sugar, granulated, or other vegan sweetener
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract

Preparation

  1. Place corn, almond milk, and sugar in a large pot. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Once it simmers, turn the heat off and take off the stove.
  2. Let cool to room temperature.
  3. Place mixture in the blender, add vanilla, and process until smooth. (You can leave chunky if that is your preference.)
  4. Straining the mixture is completely optional.
  5. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze for 5 hours.

Chef's Notes

If you are using popsicle molds without an insert, refrigerate popsicles for 45 min. then insert wooden popsicle sticks. You can use coconut milk for a more decadent version. If this is your first time making these I would recommend pureeing the mixture until it is completely smooth and straining it. Once you decide if you like them or not you can play around with the texture.

 

Rajas con crema is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour “crema” is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying. Of course, the best way to eat this is in a taco. These vegan rajas con crema tacos will even impress your omnivore friends.

Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour "crema" is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying

There’s something about the smell of roasting poblano peppers that evokes so many food memories and recipes. Before going to culinary school my dad had me work at his restaurant for 6 months. Let’s just say the cooks weren’t too happy to have me around. I peeled a lot of potatoes and cracked a lot of eggs. I’ll never forget the time they had me roast and peel tray after tray of poblano peppers. They of course could do it without even thinking, no gloves, quickly, one after the other. I think it took me about 3 hours to get them done, and by the end I was almost crying (or maybe I was crying) because my hands were burning. I’m sure they had a kick out of that.

Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour "crema" is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying

Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour "crema" is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying

Poblano chiles are readily available almost anywhere in the United States. I am even able to find them here in Hawaii! They are very versatile and can be used in soups, tacos, pasta, enchiladas, stews, and they can even be stuffed and fried. They are relatively mild on the heat scale depending on where you live. Roasting and peeling them is not complicated, as you can see in this video. This is a perfect summer dish for using up all of the sweet, tender corn at your farmer’s market. If you are staying away from nuts, you can omit the “crema” and serve with a salsa instead.

Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour "crema" is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying

The heat here in Hawaii is starting to rise and ice cream, paletas, and aguas frescas have been on my mind lately. What recipes would you like to see?

The Recipe: Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos

This recipe is pretty straight forward. You can skip the roasting of the poblano peppers if you’re in a hurry, but they will not be as tender as if you had roasted them. The crema can me made without oil by substituting it with unsweetened almond milk. I use the almonds with the peel on because I prefer the flavor, but if you are looking for a really white crema, you can use blanched almonds instead. Enjoy!

Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos is one of those true Mexican comfort dishes. Poblano peppers are roasted over an open flame, peeled, cut into strips, then sauted with onion, garlic, and corn. A thick, slightly sour "crema" is poured over the whole thing. It is spicy, creamy, and incredibly satisfying
4 from 5 votes
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Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos

Vegan Rajas con Crema tacos, roasted poblano peppers sautéed with onion, garlic, and corn and bathed in an almond crema.

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword poblano peppers, rajas con crema, vegan tacos
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 5 Poblano peppers,roasted, peeled, seeded, cut into strips
  • 1/4 Water
  • 1 Onion, white, large, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 3 ears Corn, kernels sliced off
  • ½ cup Vegetable stock or broth

Crema: (see note)

  • ½ cup Almonds, raw
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • ¾ cup Water
  • ¼ cup Almond milk, unsweetened or vegetable oil (see note)
  • 1 tbsp. Lemon juice fresh

Preparation

To make the filling:

  1. Heat a large sauté pan to medium heat, add water. Add the onion and sweat for 2-3 minutes or until it is tender and translucent.

  2. Add corn, garlic, and ½ cup of vegetable stock, cover and let steam until corn is tender, about 3 – 4 minutes.
  3. Add the poblano peppers and let cook for 1 minute more. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

Almond Crema:

  1. Place the almonds, garlic, water,almond milk, and lemon juice in the blender and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the almond crema over the cooled filling and mix well.

  2. Serve with warm corn tortillas.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you are a no-oil vegan use unsweetened almond milk for the crema, but if you don't mind oil use a mild vegetable oil for a super smooth sauce.

If you don't have a high powered blender soak the almonds the night before, peel them the next day, and use only 1/4 - 1/2 cup of water. 

Here are some other delicious taco recipes you can try as well:

25 Vegan Tacos for 5 de Mayo

Chickpea and Spinach Tacos

Spicy Zucchini Black Bean Tacos

Carrot and Sweet Potato Tinga Tacos

Potato and Chorizo Tacos

 

We are moving to Hawaii!!! I don’t even know where to begin. I am nervous, excited, sad, a little bit of everything. Are there any vegans in Hawaii? How about Mexicans? We have never been there, so I don’t know what to expect.

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.

The start date for my husband’s new job is the last week week of April. I know, so soon! The good thing is we have done this so many times before that the packing process does not seem daunting anymore. Nevertheless, there is a lot of work to be done.

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.

Our life continues to be a wonderful adventure, Maryland, D.C, Carlsbad, South Carolina, Orange County, and now Hawaii. I hope our kids remember it that way and don’t suffer too much from leaving their friends behind. All I have to say, is that this blog just got a whole lot more interesting! Sourcing ingredients might be a challenge though, but I plan to continue making delicious vegan Mexican recipes. Even if it’s on an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.

The funny thing is, when I was a teenager I wanted to be a missionary. I had rose colored visions of traveling the world helping people and serving God. Sometimes I still think about it and how amazing it would’ve been. Well, it turns out I did become a sort of missionary. Maybe not quite the way I had in mind, but God has his ways and they are definitely a mystery. Everywhere I go I try to be a witness of God’s love and mercy, and help others as much as I can. Now I get to do that in Hawaii, and wherever else we might go next.

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.

 

I am sad though, because I’m going to miss our wonderful friends who have supported us and helped us out in so many ways. We will never be able to repay them. Fran & Ren, Marisa & Neil, and Kristen & Jeremy we love you and will miss you terribly, but don’t think because we are far away that you will be getting rid us. You are stuck with us forever. No matter how far away we are, you know you can always count on us.

I guess we should talk about the recipe now, but stay tuned to find out what it will be like for a vegan Mexican and her family to move to Hawaii. #mexicaninhawaii

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.

The Recipe: Vegan Roasted Tomatillo Enchiladas

One of my sisters has become vegan!!! Vegan I say!! Can you believe it? She requested a recipe for enchiladas and I was happy to oblige. Roasted tomatillo enchiladas are one of my favorites. The tortillas are filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, corn, and pinto beans. Then they are bathed in a savory roasted tomatillo sauce and drizzled in a smooth almond crema. Top them with thinly sliced onions and some chopped cilantro. You can make this a quick dinner by buying already made tomatillo salsa. Enjoy!

Vegan roasted tomatillo enchiladas, filled with sautéed onions, garlic, poblano peppers, and pinto beans. Bathed in salsa and almond crema.
5 from 4 votes
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Vegan Roasted Tomatillo Enchiladas

Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

Filling

  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil, optional
  • 1/2 Onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 cup Corn, kernels
  • 1/4 cup Vegetable stock
  • 2 Poblano peppers, roasted, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 cup Pinto beans, canned

Almond Crema

  • 1/2 cup Almonds raw
  • 1/4 cup Soy milk unsweetened
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • 1 tsp. Lemon juice

Garnish

  • 12 tortillas
  • 3 cups Tomatillo salsa (see note)
  • 1/2 Onion sliced into paper thin rings
  • 1 tbsp. Cilantro chopped

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. To make the filling: heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan to medium-high heat. Once oil is hot, add onions and sauté for 3 - 4 minutes, or until almost the onions are tender and translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute.
  3. Add corn and 1/4 cup of vegetable stock. Cover and cook for 2-3 minutes or until the corn is tender. Add poblano pepper and beans and mix well. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. To make the almond crema: place all ingredients in the blender until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  5. To assemble: Warm corn tortillas in the microwave for 30 seconds or in the oven at 350F on a sheet tray for 5 min. Just enough so that the tortillas are soft enough to be rolled.
  6. Spread 2-3 tbsp. of the tomatillo sauce on the bottom of a 9 x13 baking dish Place 1 tbsp. of filling on each tortilla. Roll and place on baking dish. Continue this process until you have used up all the tortillas and the entire filling.
  7. Pour the rest of the tomatillo sauce on top of the enchiladas and bake in oven for 5 – 10 min. or until the enchiladas are warm. Remove from the oven and drizzle almond crema on top.
  8. Garnish with onion slices and chopped cilantro.

Chef's Notes

To make this a quick weeknight dinner you can buy the sauce already made and skip the roasting and peeling of the poblano peppers. You can find a recipe for a tomatillo salsa here.

 

In May, I wrote about wanting to quit blogging, so it might come as a surprise to you that I started a new blog! Unfortunately, for all you English speaking readers it’s in Spanish. I was born and raised in Mexico, which means Spanish is my primary language. I came to the U.S. as an international student in order to go to The Culinary Institute of America, thus the majority of my culinary education was imparted in English. I’m a embarrassed to say this, but I’m a bit more comfortable writing about food in English. However, my parents and a big chunk of my extended family do not speak English, and they have voiced their complains about not being able to understand anything I write. Oops!

This recipe for vegan chile relleno stuffed with zucchini and quinoa is an adaptation of a Mexican classic. It is bursting with flavor!

The reason I was hesitant to start a blog in Spanish was for the same reasons I was considering quitting this blog, it’s a lot of work! However, after receiving support and encouraging comments from a couple of readers, I am once again motivated to continue sharing recipes with you. Of course, it also really helps that the munchkin is in school full time:)

This recipe for vegan chile relleno stuffed with zucchini and quinoa is an adaptation of a Mexican classic. It is bursting with flavor!

 

This recipe for vegan chile relleno stuffed with zucchini and quinoa is an adaptation of a Mexican classic. It is bursting with flavor!

This recipe for vegan chile relleno stuffed with zucchini and quinoa is an adaptation of a Mexican classic. It is bursting with flavor!

 

This recipe for vegan chile relleno stuffed with zucchini and quinoa is an adaptation of a Mexican classic. It is bursting with flavor!

Monday is Mexico’s Independence Day, so in honor of a wonderful country, an amazing group of people, and one of the best cuisines in the world ( I might be a little bit biased here) is a recipe for chiles rellenos that is not traditional, but has all the flavor and complexity of Mexican cuisine.

The Recipe: Vegan Chile Relleno with Zucchini and Quinoa

Roasted poblano peppers are stuffed with a sauté of zucchini , corn , tomato, onion, garlic, and quinoa. They are slathered in a creamy chipotle sauce or you can use whatever salsa you like. If quinoa is not easily accessible to you, feel free to use rice instead. Enjoy!

5 from 1 vote
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Vegan Chile Relleno with Zucchini and Quinoa

Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

Zucchini Sauté (Calabacitas)

  • 1 tbsp. Grapeseed oil (optional)
  • 1 cup Onion, white, finely diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 Ears of corn, cut into kernels
  • 1/4 cup Vegetable stock or water
  • 3 Zucchini, cut into large dice
  • 2 cups Tomato, fresh or canned, diced

Stuffed Peppers

  • 8 Poblano peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded 8 ea.
  • 3 cups Quinoa, cooked
  • Zucchini sauté, Recipe above
  • Creamy Chipotle Sauce (see note)

Preparation

  1. In a large heavy bottomed pot, set to medium heat; sweat the onion in 1 tbsp. of oil for 2 to 3 minutes until onion is translucent.
  2. Add corn and ¼ cup of water or veg stock, cover and let steam until corn is tender, about 3 – 4 minutes.
  3. Uncover, add zucchini and cook for 3-4 minutes, until it begins to soften.
  4. Add tomato and cook for 2 minutes more.
  5. Season and reserve for later use.
  6. Stuff the bottom of the chiles with quinoa and top with zucchini mixture. Pour chipotle sauce on top and serve.

Chef's Notes

If you can’t find quinoa or don’t like it, you can use rice. You can find the recipe for the creamy chipotle sauce here. 

 

 

The first day of school is only eleven days away. It will mark the end of what seems to be an endless summer. The munchkin and I really need to meet some people. We are starting to get bored and that can only lead to trouble.

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

We have been living in Bluffton, SC for almost two months and so far we have been unimpressed with the food scene here and in Hilton Head Island. At first we were kind of disappointed, but then decided that we should just cook more at home. However, last week we took a day trip to Charleston and were pretty happy to eat some good food and enjoy some drinks while the munchkin played at Play Garden. (Drop-in childcare is the best! I’m baffled at why every city doesn’t have this, it’s genius.)

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

On the way there we stopped by the Carolina Cider Company. Their store is located on the side of the highway between Savannah and Charleston. It is an unadorned white house with a couple of signs advertising cider and free samples. We almost drove right past it! Its shelves are lined with jams, jellies, preserves, pickles and relishes. There are also homemade pies and sweet cherry, peach, and muscadine cider. We happily enjoyed a cold glass of cider on the porch. It was a welcome rest from driving.

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

We didn’t get to see much of Charleston. Since we only had couple of hours to ourselves we were not looking to do the tourist thing, we just wanted to eat.  We had appetizers at The Macintosh, drinks at the The Cocktail Club, and even more drinks at The Gin Joint. I have to say that I’m really enjoying this whole cocktail resurgence movement. Classic cocktails made with fresh ingredients are making a comeback, goodbye sour mix, hello handcrafted bitters, soda, and vermouth. We had some pretty great cocktails, but I especially enjoyed the butcher plate at Macintosh. The silky foie gras parfait, the glistening lardo, and the rich pork rillette paired perfectly with the homemade pickles and coarse mustard.

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

We were pleasantly surprised at what Charleston had to offer. All of the bartenders and servers we spoke to were very knowledgeable and professional. You could tell they had a real passion and respect for the craft. We are definitely going back! Inspired by our visit the hubby recreated a 100 yr. old punch recipe at home and I made charred okra and grits.

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

These creamy southern vegan grits are topped with a spicy charred okra, tomato, onion, garlic, and corn sauté. No dairy needed!

The Recipe: Southern Vegan Grits

Charred okra, sautéed with corn, tomato, green bell pepper, garlic, and onion top a plate of creamy grits. This dish is inspired by the classic shrimp and grits. Enjoy!

4.15 from 7 votes
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Southern Vegan Grits

Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Grits, white or yellow, coarse grind
  • 4 + 1/4 cup Vegetable Broth
  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil
  • 1 lb. Okra, cut into ½ in. pieces
  • 1 Onion, yellow, diced
  • 1 Ear of corn, cut into kernels
  • 3 Garlic, cloves, minced
  • 1 Green bell pepper, seeded, diced
  • 1 Tomato, large, diced
  • 1/4 cup Green onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp. Red pepper flakes
  • To taste Salt kosher
  • To Taste Black pepper ground

Preparation

  1. In a large heavy bottomed pot, bring 4 cups of broth to a boil. Add the grits in gradually while stirring constantly.
  2. Lower heat to a simmer and cover. Stir constantly every five minutes to prevent grits from sticking.
  3. Cook for 20 to 25 min. or until grits are tender. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper.
  4. While the grits are cooking, set a large sauté pan to high heat and add 1 tbsp. of oil.
  5. When the pan is hot, add the okra and cook for 5 – 6 minutes. Shake the pan every two minutes to let the okra brown evenly. Remove the okra from the pan and set aside.
  6. Using the same pan, turn heat down to low and add the onion and sweat for 2 -3 min. until translucent.
  7. Add corn and ¼ cup of vegetable broth. Cover and cook for 5 min. or until corn is tender and the liquid is close to evaporating.
  8. Add garlic and green bell peppers. Cook for 2 min. then add tomatoes, green onion, and red pepper flakes.
  9. Cook for 5 more minutes, until the tomatoes have begun to soften. Add okra back into the pan. Season with salt and pepper and serve over grits.

Chef's Notes

The okra is cooked at a high heat to prevent it from getting slimy. Make sure your pan is hot!