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This sweet and tender semita bread is designed to be eaten with your morning café de olla or a cold glass of your favorite plant-milk. Piloncillo, raisins, cinnamon, orange zest, and anise are studded throughout the semita, making it an incredibly fragrant and delicious Mexican pan dulce.

Flour, water, yeast in a large stainless steel bowl

Origin of Semita Bread

In the 16th century, a group of Semitic Jews came to the new world, brought by Luis de Carvajal y de la Cueva to settle what is now the state of Nuevo Leon, escaping the Spanish Inquisition that was in full force at the time. This Jewish community colonized the states of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and parts of what is now Texas, and continued to practice their faith in secret. It is thought that this community ate bread during Passover very similar to what we consider semita bread now, with the exception of the piloncillo and raisins. The origin of this bread, however, can be traced back to Spain and Islamic North Africa.

Dough for semita bread mixed in a stainless steel bowl

Semita vs. Cemita

Semita is not the same as cemita, and to confuse things even more sometimes they are both spelled the same. Semita is the sweet bread recipe I have for you today, made with piloncillo, raisins, and sometimes nuts. Cemita is a savory roll, with sesame seeds on top, that is used to make tortas, huge tortas that are very famous in Puebla.

ball of dough in a stainless steel bowl with dough hook in it

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

dough hook stretching the dough to show the texture

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Chihuahua, is the creation of the talented Liliana Arellanes from @veganocosmico and here she is sharing her story with us.

Ball of dough resting in a stainless steel bowl

Liliana’s Story

My Name is Liliana Arellanes; I am from Chihuahua Mexico but have been living in Los Angeles, CA for the last 30 years. My path to Veganism began 25 years ago, for two fundamental reasons, respect, and compassion for all living beings, and respect for myself. Understanding above all, that it is not necessary to kill another living being in order to eat. In this way, we will be nourishing ourselves with Light and not death.

Pecans, raisins, orange zest and pilincillo are added to the dough in the bowl

 

I share the recipe of the famous “CHORREADAS DE PILONCILLO” a typical bread of the region, with a delicious flavor reminiscent of “small town” comfort food. I have added my personal touch, with raisins, nuts, and fragrant orange zest. It is an exquisite handmade sweet bread, with a spongy crumb that you can enjoy fresh out of the oven with a café de olla or a glass of almond milk.

 

dough mixed well and shaped into a ball again

The Recipe: Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  • You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.

four balls of dough on a parchment lined sheet tray

  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.

basket of mexican semita bread and a white plate with slices of semita

a closeup of a piece of semita bread being held in a hand

Three mexican semita bread rolls in a basket on a light blue background
5 from 1 vote
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Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

Mexican Semita Bread, studded with pecans, raisins, orange zest and piloncillo.

Course Breakfast
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword pan dulce, semita bread, vegan mexican breakfast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Resting Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings 4 Medium sized rolls
824 kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 ½ cup Bread flour
  • ½ cup Dark brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. Ground anise seed
  • 1 tsp Freshly ground cinnamon (Ceylon)
  • 1/3 cup Coconut butter, about 3 oz
  • 1 ½ cups Warm water
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ cup Raisins, soaked in the juice of one orange
  • 1 tsp. Orange zest
  • 1 tsp. Active dry yeast
  • 3.5 oz Piloncillo (about ½ cup)
  • ½ tsp. Salt

Preparation

  1. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients flour, sugar, anise, cinnamon, yeast, and salt
  2. Add the warm water and coconut butter to the bowl and knead.
  3. I use the hook attachment on my mixer at medium-low speed for 4-6 minutes or until the dough has come off the sides of the bowl and is stretchy but not sticky.
  4. If you don’t have a mixer you can knead by hand for 10 minutes or until you reach the desired consistency.
  5. Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a kitchen towel and let rise for an hour.
  6. To prepare your piloncillo, place it in a plastic bag, and crush it with the help of a hammer until finely ground.
  7. Separate the crushed piloncillo un half. Place half of the piloncillo in a small bowl and mix with 1 tsp. Flour. This will be used to top the semitas before baking.
  8. Once the dough is done rising, add the reaming half of the piloncillo, pecans, and orange zest and knead until all the ingredients are mixed evenly throughout.
  9. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  10. Divide the dough in four, roll the pieces tightly into rounds, and place on a sheet tray lined with parchment. Press down on the rounds lightly. Brush the rounds with your favorite plant milk, and top with the piloncillo and flour mixture. Press down slightly on the piloncillo topping with your hands.
  11. Cover the sheet tray with a kitchen towel and let the dough rise for 20 minutes.
  12. Bake for 20 minutes at 350°F.

Chef's Notes

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  •  You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.
  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.
Nutrition Facts
Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 824 Calories from Fat 171
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 19g 29%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Sodium 263mg 11%
Potassium 381mg 11%
Total Carbohydrates 149g 50%
Dietary Fiber 8g 32%
Sugars 50g
Protein 16g 32%
Vitamin C 3.8%
Calcium 8.2%
Iron 17.1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Sauce pot filled with water, cinnamon, and piloncillo

Champurrado History

Champurrrado ingredients are quite simple but the combination is irresistible. Before the Spanish arrived in Mexico with their cows and their milk, champurrado was made with water.

Glass bowl with fresh masa

It is said that the great Aztec emperor Moctezuma Xocoyotzin enjoyed this beverage which he drank in ceremonial vessels made of gold, sweetened with agave honey, and spiced with a bit of chile.

Glass bowl filled with masa and water

Fray Bernardino de Sahagún documented the consumption of atoll or atolli which was drunk by the indigenous warm or cold, for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes.

Glass bowl with masa and water and a hand mixing it together.

Atole vs Champurrado

So what is the difference between atole and champurrado?? Atole is also a drink from pre-Columbian times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. Champurrado is simply atole with chocolate added to it, in other words, chocolate atole.

Bronze colored colander filled with the remnants of the strained masa

How to Make Champurrado

Making champurrado is quite easy, the piloncillo and cinnamon are simmered in water until completely dissolved, then a Mexican chocolate tablet is added. Once the chocolate has melted into the piloncillo mixture the fresh masa is added. The masa thickens the chocolate creating a thick, sweet, and chocolatey drink. Then everything is frothed with a molinillo and served hot.

Masa liquid being poured into a saucepot

The Recipe: How to Make Champurrado

This authentic Mexican champurrado is made with water instead of milk, just like in pre-Columbian times.

  • If you want to use milk I recommend you use almond-coconut milk.
  • The recipe calls for fresh masa, but if you can’t find it you can use masa harina.
  • I’ve used Ibarra chocolate, but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate.
  • Enjoy!!

Chapurrado in a sauce pot being frothed with a molinillo

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it

A mug of champurrado on a colored towel and a tamal beside it
5 from 1 vote
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Champurrado

These cold winter nights call for a nice hot mug of champurrado. Champurrado is a pre-Colombian drink made with fresh masa, water, piloncillo, and Mexican chocolate. It is especially good with perfectly tender tamales.

Course Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword champurrado, chocolate, vegan mexican
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 cups
96 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup Chopped piloncillo (2-4 oz.)
  • 1 Mexican Chocolate disk (I used Ibarra, chopped into 4 pieces)
  • ½ cup Fresh masa for tortillas (nixtamal)

Preparation

  1. Place 3 cups of water, chopped piloncillo, and cinnamon stick in a medium sauce pot and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 1 to 2 minutes or until the piloncillo has completely dissolved.
  2. Add the Mexican chocolate and continue to simmer and stir until chocolate has completely dissolved, about 3 minutes.
  3. In the meantime place the fresh masa in a large bowl and pour 1 cup of water over the masa. Use your hand to dissolve the masa into the water.
  4. Strain the masa liquid, and pour it into the simmering hot chocolate. Stir and froth with a molinillo or whisk.
  5. Simmer for 6 to 8 minutes or until the champurrado has thickened. Serve hot!!

Chef's Notes

If you like your champurrado on the thick side use ¾ cup of fresh masa, but remember, the champurrado will continue to thicken as it cools. I used Ibarra chocolate but you can use your favorite Mexican hot chocolate. If you can’t find fresh masa you can use 3/4 cup of masa harina.

Nutrition Facts
Champurrado
Amount Per Serving
Calories 96 Calories from Fat 27
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 14mg 1%
Potassium 87mg 2%
Total Carbohydrates 14g 5%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 1g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 0.6%
Calcium 4.1%
Iron 11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Disclaimer: The post is in partnership with Hernán & may include affiliate links.

Are you a fan of Mexican hot chocolate?? Well you are going to love these Mexican hot chocolate popsicles.  Maybe the thought of eating frozen hot chocolate doesn’t get you excited, but let me change your mind.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon. They are everything that’s good about Mexican chocolate but in paleta form.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

For this recipe I used my new favorite Mexican hot chocolate: Hernán. I found out about Hernan at a local festival here in San Antonio and I instantly fell in love with their all-natural, vegan products.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

Hernán is the real deal, and I’m not talking about adding cinnamon to cocoa powder and calling it Mexican chocolate. I mean real, authentic, Mexican chocolate sourced from Chiapas, and ground with sugar and cinnamon. In fact, the cacao used to make Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is organic and from a biodiversified plantation! I can’t wait to experiment more with Hernán chocolate, maybe I’ll make Mexican chocolate ice cream next.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

I tried several ways of making this recipe, testing out several different plant milks and methods, but I couldn’t get them creamy enough.Doing some research online, I found a couple of recipes that were doing chocolate and avocado popsicles and I thought maybe I should try it.

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

I’m not going to lie, I was super hesitant to use avocado in this recipe. I thought it would change the taste too much. Finally I decided to give it a go and I was shocked. The avocado makes this the creamiest chocolate popsicle ever, without any unhealthy animal fats, and it doesn’t affect the flavor at all.

The kids loved them and I hope you like them too!

The Recipe: Mexican Hot Chocolate Popsicles (Paletas de Chocolate)

  • The recipe calls for 1 tablilla per cup of milk, but if you really like dark chocolate I would use 1 1/2 tablillas per cup of milk.
  • You can use any sweetener of choice, maple syrup would be really good with this though.
  • Make sure your avocado is ripe
  • This is the mold that I used to make these.
  • Enjoy!
These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.
5 from 1 vote
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Mexican Hot Chocolate Popsicles

These Mexican hot chocolate paletas (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon. 
Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings 6 popsicles
131 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablets (tablillas) Hernan Mexican chocolate
  • 2 cups Almond-coconut milk, unsweetened
  • 1 Avocado ripe, cut in half, flesh removed
  • 2 tbsp. Sugar or maple syrup

Preparation

  1. Bring the coconut-almond milk to a very low simmer over low heat. Add chocolate tablets and sugar, and stir with a whisk or molinillo.
  2. Once the chocolate has dissolved pour it in a container and let it cool completely in the fridge or freezer.
  3. Place the chocolate mixture, avocado, and sugar in the blender, and puree until smooth.

  4. Pour into popsicle molds, snap on the lids, and freeze for at least 5 hours.

Chef's Notes

• The recipe calls for 1 tablilla per cup of milk, but if you really like dark chocolate I would use 1 1/2 tablillas per cup of milk.

• You can use any sweetener of choice, maple syrup would be really good with this though.

• Make sure your avocado is ripe.

Nutrition Facts
Mexican Hot Chocolate Popsicles
Amount Per Serving (1 popsicle)
Calories 131 Calories from Fat 72
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8g 12%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Sodium 110mg 5%
Potassium 162mg 5%
Total Carbohydrates 18g 6%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 10g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 1%
Vitamin C 4.1%
Calcium 10.4%
Iron 1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Are you looking for more paleta recipes?? Check these out

Strawberry Paletas

Coconut Paletas

Cucumer-Chile Paletas

Mango-Chile Paletas

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. In the US these are known as Mexican wedding cookies, and are dusted with powdered sugar. In northern Mexico, where I’m from, they are very popular during the Christmas season. You can see them displayed in panadería windows, and are often given as gifts.

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I This is the mother of all cookie recipes (cue angelic choir). It might just be one recipe, but you can make many different kinds of cookies, I made 3, apricot thumbprint cookies, hojarascas dusted with cinnamon sugar, and pecan hojarascas dusted with powdered sugar. On the other hand, if anise and orange isn’t your thing, you can add ground nuts, dried fruits, or even coat them in chocolate. Our favorite cookie out of the three was a small round one dusted in cinnamon-sugar.

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I

Now that we live in San Antonio visiting family is so much easier, and I am very happy to be spending Christmas in my childhood home. My mom goes all out on the Christmas decorations, and the kids are so excited about Santa coming and are counting down the days. We are making tamales tomorrow for Christmas eve, and are planning all sorts of games and activities for the children. I hope you have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I

The Recipe: Orange and Anise Vegan Hojarascas

  • I used Earth Balance as a butter substitute, which is salted, so if you use salted butter omit the salt in the recipe.( I did try to make these with coconut oil, but I wasn’t a fan of the result.)
  • The recipe is so simple. You cream butter and sugar, then add the orange zest, anise, and vanilla extract.
  • You can add 1/4 cup of finely chopped pecans if you like nuts, then dust with cinnamon sugar or powdered sugar depending on your preferences. ¡Enjoy!

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I

 

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar. I
5 from 1 vote
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Orange and Anise Vegan Hojarascas

These vegan hojarascas, also known as polvorones, are scented with ground anise and orange zest, and dusted with cinnamon sugar.
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2 dozen
118 kcal
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 5 oz. (2/3 cup) Sugar, granulated
  • 12 oz. (1 ½ cups) Vegan butter, room temperature
  • 16 oz. (3 cups) Flour, all-purpose
  • 1 tsp. Ground anise seed
  • 1 tbsp. Orange zest
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract

Cinnamon-sugar:

  • 1 ¼ cups Cane sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Freshly ground cinnamon

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Cream butter and sugar, in an electric mixer with the paddle attachment.
  3. Add vanilla, orange zest, and ground anise. Mix.
  4. Slowly add flour, with mixer at low speed. Mix until well combined.
  5. Line 2 sheet-pans with parchment paper. Roll out dough on a floured surface to ¼ inch thick and cut into desired shapes (you can also roll dough into 1 inch balls and bake them that way).
  6. Place cut dough on sheet-tray, 1 inch apart from each other.
  7. Bake for 15 minutes or until bottoms become golden brown.
  8. Remove from oven. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, dust with cinnamon sugar.
  9. Place on a wire rack to cool.

Chef's Notes

You can add ¼ cup of finely chopped pecans to the dough if you like and eat nuts. You can also use this cookie dough recipe to make thumbprint cookies. Dust with powdered sugar instead of cinnamon sugar for a more Mexican wedding cookies look. 

Nutrition Facts
Orange and Anise Vegan Hojarascas
Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)
Calories 118 Calories from Fat 51
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5.7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Sodium 67.16mg 3%
Potassium 15.8mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 15g 5%
Sugars 8g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 5%
Vitamin C 0.5%
Calcium 0.5%
Iron 2.75%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition Facts
Orange and Anise Vegan Hojarascas
Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)
Calories 118 Calories from Fat 51
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5.7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Sodium 67.16mg 3%
Potassium 15.8mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 15g 5%
Sugars 8g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 5%
Vitamin C 0.5%
Calcium 0.5%
Iron 2.75%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

I never liked atole as a child, probably because we would have those artificially flavored packets of Maizena atole. This almond atole is something completely different. Almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina combine to make this a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.

Atole is a drink from pre-hispanic times that can be sweet or savory depending on the region in Mexico where you are. It was drank by the indigenous people of Mexico for breakfast or sometimes as a meal in itself. It was also used for medicinal and ceremonial purposes. Traditionally, it is made by dissolving ground dried corn in milk or water, and adding fruits or different flavorings to it. It is available all year, but is especially popular in the winter months.

Currently, atole is also made with cornstarch, rice flour, oat flour, or barley. Its consistency ranges from thin and milky, to very thick.  It is drank on special occasions like the Day of the Dead, Christmas, baptism, first communions, weddings, and feast days. Tamales and atole is classic pairing and one you should definitely try.

While doing research on atole I happened to find that almond atole is a favorite of my home state, Coahuila. I had never tried it before, so I decided to give it a try. I was pleasantly surprised at how delicious it was, and nothing like the packaged version of atole that you can find at Mexican grocery stores. Like always, I made way too much of it, and saved what we didn’t drink in the fridge. The next day I served it to the kids for breakfast, almost like a porridge, and they ate it all up.

The Recipe: Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. You can buy fresh masa at some tortillerias or Mexican groceries. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well. I haven’t made this recipe too sweet, so feel free to sweeten it up. ¡Enjoy!

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage.
3.8 from 5 votes
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Almond Atole (Atole Almendrado)

This almond atole combines almond milk, ground almonds, cinnamon. piloncillo, and masa harina to make a warm, comforting, and sweet beverage
Total Time 25 minutes
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 stick Ceylon cinnamon
  • 1 cup Masa harina, maseca
  • 1 ½ cups Raw Almonds or (1 2/3 cup almond meal)
  • ½-3/4 cup Piloncillo, brown sugar or maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon

Preparation

  1. Heat almond milk in a medium sauce pot, bring to a simmer.
  2. While the milk comes to a simmer, grind the almonds in your blender until they resemble a powder. Set aside.
  3. Dissolve the masa harina in a little bit of water.
  4. Add the masa harina to the almond milk, and mix well.
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes, stirring to make sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.
  6. Add the ground almonds, cinnamon, and piloncillo to the saucepot. Simmer at very low heat for 15 minutes. Stir well.
  7. Serve hot. As it cools it will thicken, so add more almond milk if necessary.

Chef's Notes

I have used masa harina or maseca for this recipe. but if you have access to fresh masa I would recommend you use that instead. Also make sure the cinnamon stick is a true ceylon cinnamon (also known as Mexican cinnamon). You can use whatever sweetener you like, I used piloncillo, but brown sugar would also work well.

 

 

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Yes! These pancakes are stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries, spiced with Mexican cinnamon, and drizzled with maple syrup. They are one of our favorite pancakes in our house, and they are vegan and refined sugar-free.

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

My 7 yr. old asked me, very seriously the other day, if I could teach him how to cook. I replied with an enthusiastic: ” Sure!”, but the truth is I’m not sure. Of course he needs to learn how to cook, it’s an invaluable life skill that will serve him well his whole life, but does he really need to learn now? What if he loves cooking? What if he loves cooking so much that he wants to be a chef? No!!!

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

The life of a chef is anything but easy. There’s long hours of physically demanding work, and an incredible amount of pressure and stress. Not to mention the high cost of culinary school and the low pay. Don’t get me wrong, I love what I do, if I had to do it over again I would probably choose to go to culinary school once more, but sometimes I wonder if I should’ve chosen a career in tech or anything else for that matter. At the end of the day though, what career he chooses is not up to me.

So I decided to let him do something easy, like pancakes. I gathered all the ingredients for him, but he had to measure them  out and do the hard work of mixing the batter. Pouring the batter into than pan and flipping the pancake was his favorite part, and after wiping down all the flour and cocoa powder that was sprinkled on the counter, he ran off to play legos like making pancakes in the morning was the most natural thing in the world. Before leaving though, he turned around and said, ” Can we put the pancakes on Dora’s Table?” So here they are, Tommy’s vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes.

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes

I have used a combination of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour, but you can do use just one of them without a problem. If you are doing no-oil, substitute it for unsweetened apple sauce. Enjoy!

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!
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Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes

Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword chocolate and strawberry, vegan pancakes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 10 Pancakes
138 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 tbsp. Flaxseed, ground
  • 1/4 cup Maple syrup
  • 2 tsp. Apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Water
  • 2 tbsp. Coconut oil (sub unsweetened apple sauce)
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup All-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup Whole wheat flour
  • 3 1/2 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 tsp. Ground Mexican cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup Cocoa powder, unsweetened
  • 1 cup Thinly sliced strawberries

Preparation

  1. In a small bowl combine the almond milk, ground flaxseed. Mix well, and let rest for 5 minutes. 

  2. Add vinegar, water, vanilla extract, and oil (or applesauce) to the almond milk mixture. Whisk to incorporate.

  3. In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and cocoa powder. 

  4. Make a well in the center of the flour bowl and add liquid mixture. Whisk until a lumpy batter forms. Let rest for 10 min.

  5. To cook pancakes, heat a skillet to medium-low heat and grease lightly. Pour batter onto pan and place 3 strawberries on the pancake batter. Use a spoon to spread some of the batter on top of the strawberries to cover them. Let cook for about 3 min. or until fluffy and golden brown.

  6. Flip and cook pancake on other side for 3 more minutes.

  7. Repeat with the rest of the batter. 

  8. Serve with maple syrup.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

I have used a combination of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour, but you can do use just one of them without a problem. If you are doing no-oil, substitute it for unsweetened apple sauce.

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes
Amount Per Serving (1 Pancake)
Calories 138 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g 6%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Sodium 132mg 6%
Potassium 312mg 9%
Total Carbohydrates 23g 8%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 3g 6%
Vitamin C 10.3%
Calcium 13.3%
Iron 8.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

It has taken me some time to finally come up with an acceptable vegan version of Mexican hot chocolate. First we tested different types of Mexican chocolates until we found the best one.  Then we tested different types of plant milks, until finally we did it! This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

We tried 4 different types of plant milks for this recipe: coconut, almond, macadamia, and soy. I chose not to test rice and oat milk, because I thought they would be to thin and watery. The almond milk was our least favorite, which was a surprise, because I thought it was going to be the best one. The flavor was a little bit bitter, the texture thin, but it did foam up really well. Our next least favorite was the coconut milk. The coconut flavor completely overpowered everything, and the texture was almost too fatty. You could feel the fat coating your mouth, and not in a good way. The foam was average. One of our favorites was the macadamia nut milk. The flavor of the macadamia milk was very subtle, and the texture was creamy without being overpowering. The foam was average. Our favorite out of all of them was the soy milk. This was a complete surprise to me. The soy milk really let the chocolate shine through, the texture was just the right amount of creamy, and the foam was thick and bubbly.

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

(Just on a side note: The beautiful napkin you see in the picture is from Kari of the site Beautiful Ingredient., a vegan blog focused on bringing in more plant- based meals into your daily life. The napkins are handmade and vegan. You can also find coasters, pot holders, and dishcloths. You can find them on her site or on her shop on Food52.)

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.

The family and I are still enjoying time at my parents’ house and we are having a blast. Christmas and New Years was great, I didn’t realize how much I really missed them, and how far away Hawaii really is. It’s time to get back to work though, and I’ve been busy trying to find the best spot to take pictures and start developing new recipes. I didn’t make any New Years resolutions this time, instead I chose a word to keep me motivated the whole year. My word is perseverance: steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success. No matter what this year brings, good or bad, we will persevere. With God’s help of course. How was your holiday?

The Recipe: The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

To make this amazing vegan Mexican hot chocolate we used the TAZA chocolate Mexicano cinnamon tablets, soy milk, and a hand blender to get the foam just right. If you are a traditionalist you can use a molinillo or if you prefer convenience you can use a blender. Serve with these marranitos de piloncillo or these vegan conchas. 

This creamy, foamy, rich, and delicious vegan Mexican hot chocolate has a hint a cinnamon and just the right amount of sweetness.
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The Perfect Vegan Mexican Hot Chocolate

Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 servings
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 pckg. (2.7 oz) Taza Chocolate Mexicano, cinnamon
  • 2 cups Soy milk

Preparation

  1. In a medium sauce pot, heat the milk over medium heat until just about to simmer.

  2. Chop chocolate, and add to pot. 

  3. Whisk until the chocolate dissolves. Be careful not to overheat the milk.

  4. Remove the pot from the heat and froth with a molinillo, hand blender, or blender. 

  5. Serve while hot and frothy. 

Chef's Notes

You can find several flavors of Taza Chocolate Mexicano, use your favorite. 

I have done it! After three failed attempts, here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. Ok, I might be a little too excited about this one, but hear me out. This is my favorite pan dulce, you can ask any of my family members, and they will be sure to tell you I have eaten many marranitos in my life! A marranito is a Mexican pastry shaped like a piggy. It can be soft like a sweet bread or more on the hard side like a cookie. This version is more like a pastry than a cookie. It is made with a combination of whole wheat and white flour and infused with a piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon syrup.

Here is the best vegan marranito (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

It took me so long to get the recipe right because I wanted it to be low-fat. I tried substituting the fat with beans and the result was as weird as it sounds. Then I tried substituting the fat with apple sauce and added a flax-egg, which was a big mistake because they turned out super gummy. I finally gave up and went with the apple sauce and 2 tbsp. of oil. I am pretty happy with the result. They taste just as they should, so much so, that the kids ate them so fast I hardly had time to photograph them. We dunked them in the thickest Mexican hot chocolate.

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

School starts this week in Hawaii and we are not ready for summer to end. After many weeks of deliberation we have decided to homeschool. We did not make this decision lightly, but I think this is the best choice for us right now. I am terrified and hopeful at the same time. We are getting everything set up and we should be ready to go in the next few weeks. The good thing is that we still have a lot of Hawaii to explore, so that will keep us very busy.

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

The Recipe: The Best Vegan Marranitos

I recommend eating the marranitos while they are still warm out of the oven and dunking them in hot chocolate or coffee. If you would like to make these with fat you can substitute the amount of apple sauce with vegan butter or coconut oil. Enjoy!

Here is the best vegan marranitos (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.

Here is the best vegan marranito (Mexican piggy cookies) recipe ever. They are infused with piloncillo, star anise, clove, and cinnamon.
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Marranitos

Prep Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 25 minutes
Servings 8 large marranitos
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup Water
  • 3/4 cup Piloncillo, 4.5 oz
  • 2 Cloves, whole
  • 1 stick Mexican cinnamon
  • 1 Star anise
  • 1 cup + 2 tbsp. Flour, all-purpose
  • 1 cup Flour, whole wheat
  • 1 tsp. Baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt kosher
  • 1/2 cup Apple sauce
  • 2 tbsp. Vegetable oil

Preparation

  1. Place water, piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and star anise in a medium sauce pot set to medium heat. Simmer slowly and stir until the piloncillo dissolves. Remove from heat and let cool.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the whole wheat and all purpose flours, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  3. Strain the piloncillo syrup into a medium bowl. Add the apple sauce and oil and mix well.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until the dough begin to comes together.
  5. Use your hands to incorporate the dough together and form a ball. The dough will be on the wet side.
  6. Cover in plastic wrap and place in the fridge for an hour or in the freezer for 30 min.
  7. Preheat oven to 350F.
  8. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll out on a floured surface to 1/4 inch thickness.
  9. Use a large pig shaped cookie cutter to cut out the dough and place them on a parchment lined sheet tray.
  10. Reform the dough scraps into a ball and roll out again to cut out more marranitos. Repeat this process until you cannot cut out any more.
  11. Bake for 15 minutes or until the marranitos are golden brown on the bottom.
  12. Remove from oven and let cool slightly.

Chef's Notes

These are best eaten warm out the oven or dunked in hot chocolate or coffee. If you would like to make these with fat substitute the apple sauce with vegan butter or coconut oil.

 

Something strange is happening in our house. Our 6 yr old, Dylan, has been asking what vegan is. My husband is an omnivore, so I cook 3 vegan meals, 3 non-vegan meals and we eat out one day a week. We don’t really use labels with our food, so the kids don’t think about our meals as vegan or non-vegan. They will eat almost anything, as long as it’s good.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

He has been hearing the word vegan a lot though, because of the blog, and my husband constantly asking if something I have prepared is vegan (possibly with a grimace on his face). I don’t want Dylan to think of vegan food as different or worse than other food, so I have been naming some of his favorite foods and letting him know they are vegan. He loves tofu! When he asked me what vegan was, the best explanation I could give him was that it was food that came from plants, not animals. He kind of nodded and moved on to the next distracting thing in his path.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

Now that the WHO (World Health Organization) has stated that processed meats can cause cancer, it is more important than ever to demistify plant-based food and show others, especially our children, how great you can feel from eating it and how delicious it can be.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

The Recipe: Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

This is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. A cinderella pumpkin is cut into thick wedges, and simmered slowly in piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel. Once the pumpkin is soft and tender, it is drizzled in its own syrup. Traditionally it is served with milk, but this version is topped with decadent coconut whipped cream. Enjoy!

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

candied pumpkin (calabaza en tacha)
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Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

Prep Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours
Servings 10 servings
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 small (4 -5 lbs.) Cinderella pumpkin
  • 1 lb. Piloncillo, (2 cones)
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1 Clove, whole
  • 1 strip Orange peel
  • ¾ cup Water

Preparation

  1. Place the piloncillo, water, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel in a large pot or dutch oven set to low heat. Let the piloncillo slowly dissolve, stir frequently.
  2. In the meantime, rinse the pumpkin well to remove any dirt. With a small knife cut a circle around the stem of the pumpkin. Almost like you are carving a jack-o-lantern. Remove the stem and pull out the seeds and flesh attached to it. Leave the rest if the seeds and flesh inside.
  3. Following the natural vertical grooves of the pumpkin, cut it into wedges from top to bottom. The wedges should be about 2 ½ “ wide x 3 “ long. You do not need to remove the seeds, but you can if desired. Score the skin of the pumpkin wedges with a small knife to help them absorb the syrup.
  4. Once the piloncillo has completely dissolved, remove the pot from the heat and layer the pumpkin wedges skin side down on the bottom of the pot. Once you have covered the bottom of the pot completely, add a second layer of pumpkin wedges flesh side down, so that the pumpkin is touching flesh to flesh.
  5. Cover the pot and set it to medium- low heat. Let the pumpkin simmer for 1½ hours. Don’t worry about not having enough liquid in the pot. As the pumpkin cooks it will release a large quantity of water.
  6. Uncover the pot and let simmer for ½ hour more or until the pumpkin is a dark brown color and is completely submerged in the syrup. Take off the heat and let cool.
  7. Serve hot or cold and top with coconut whipped cream. (see note)

Chef's Notes

If you cannot find Cinderella pumpkins, use a sugar pumpkin instead. Here is  a super easy recipe for coconut whipped cream.

 

 

 

Licuado de plátano is the Mexican version of a banana smoothie. It’s more like a hybrid between a smoothie and a milk shake. I guess you could say it’s a healthy banana shake. Its main ingredient is milk, then fruit, and some people add honey and even granola, ice is optional.

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