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Tamales are probably one of my favorite things in the whole world!! If you want to learn how to make vegan tamales look no further. Unlike what you may think they are not difficult to make at all. They are a bit time consuming, but with some help from friends or family you can make a tamalada and enjoy vegan tamales all year.

I have searched the internet far and wide for the best vegan tamales out there so you don’t have to. Here are over 15 different recipes that you can use and adapt to your liking. Enjoy!!

Savory and Easy Vegan Tamales

Did you know there are both sweet and savory tamales? Here is a list of our favorite savory ones.

1. Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel                           dorastable.com

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed to perfection. What makes these so good is that the masa is spiced with guajillo chiles, coconut oil, and cumin. Find recipe HERE.

2. Jalapeño and Cactus Tamales

Jalapeño and cactus tamales on a white plate                                                                     nibblesandfeasts.com

These jalapeño and cactus tamales are super easy to make. Rather than stuffing each tamal individually, the pickled jalapeños and cooked cactus bits are added to the masa and mixed thoroughly, making the spreading so quick. (This recipe does call for chicken bouillon powder, but you can substitute for Better than Bouillon No Chicken Base.) Find the recipe HERE.

3. Sweet Potato, Spinach, and Black Bean Tamales

Chipotle sweet potato and black bean vegan tamales on a wooden board                                naturallyella.com

Sweet potato, black beans, and spinach simmered in a chipotle sauce. Smoky, sweet, and full of delicious goodness. This dough is seasoned with oregano and coconut oil. You can find the recipe HERE.

4. Vegan Green Corn Tamales

Vegan Green Corn Tamales on a white plate and a green background createdmindfully.com

Vegan Green Corn Tamales. These rich, spicy tamales are made with Hatch green chiles, fresh white corn, and masa harina. Wrapped in fresh corn leaves and steamed. You can find the recipe HERE.

5. Oil-Free Vegan Tamales

Oil-Free Tamales filled with black beans, sweet potatoes, and green chiles cut in half. brandnewvegan.com

Oil-Free Tamales filled with black beans, sweet potatoes, and green chiles in a New Mexican red chile sauce. Instead of oil the masa uses pureed corn, kind of genius! You can find the recipe HERE.

6. Potato and Pinto Bean Vegan Tamales

a vegan tamal topped with crema tomatoes and onion on a plate.               sweetsimplevegan.com  

These Potato and Pinto Bean vegan tamales are also filled Anaheim peppers and tomatoes, spiced with a touch if cumin and chili powder. The masa is made with extra-virgin olive oil. You can find the recipe HERE.

7. Low-Fat Vegan Tamales

A brown plate with a vegan tamal topped with salsa, surrounded by rice and beans.cheftographer.com

These tamales are filled with a black bean-zucchini stew, but the best part is that the masa has a secret ingredient. Instead of oil or shortening, it uses pumpkin puree to substitute the fat. They are healthy and delicious!! Find the recipe HERE.

8. Vegan Potato Adobo Tamales

Two vegan tamales on a wooden board, one cut open                                        dorastable.com

Vegan potato adobo tamales filled with a mixture of potatoes and peas tossed in a spicy adobo sauce. The adobo is smoky, spicy, tangy, and has an earthy quality to it. The masa that surrounds it, is fluffy and light, and it’s all wrapped in a corn husk and steamed until tender. (This recipe uses coconut oil in the masa.) Find the recipe HERE.

9. Jalapeño and Cheese Tamales

Tamales on Mexican clay plates on a dark backgroundmexicanmademeatless.com

Tender tamales stuffed with jalapeños, tomatoes, and cheese. This recipe is vegetarian, but can be easily veganized by using vegan cheese. Find the recipe HERE. 

10. Bean and Jalapeño Tamales

Three tamales topped with salsa verde over Mexican rice.              lapinaenlacocina.com

Bean and Jalapeño Tamales filled with beans stewed in chile ancho and spices, and pickled jalapeño peppers. The recipe does call for chicken stock, but you can easily substitute for vegetable stock. Yum!! Find the recipe HERE.

11. Zucchini and Corn Tamales

A large tamal with zucchini and corn on a blue plate.                                                      muybuenocookbook.com

Zucchini and Corn Tamales, a simple and delicious vegan tamal recipe, no filling required. The masa is studded with sweet corn and zucchini then wrapped in corn husks and steamed. (This recipe calls for chicken bouillon, but you can substitute forBetter than Bouillon No Chicken Base.) You can find the recipe HERE.

12. Easy Sweet Corn Tamales

A sweet corn tamal on a white plate with salsa and crema.                                  mexicoinmykitchen.com

Sweet Corn Tamales, made with fresh corn and a sprinkle of masa harina. These can be served as sweet tamales for dessert or as savory with spicy salsa and vegan crema. (The recipe calls for butter, but can be easily substituted for vegan butter.) You can find the recipe HERE.

Sweet and Easy Vegan Tamales

If you’ve never had sweet vegan tamales you’re in for a treat. It makes so much sense when you think about it, corn itself is so sweet that it only makes sense to enhance that sweetness with flavor like lime, strawberry, chocolate, and pumpkin.

13. Lime Tamales

a lime tamal on a white and green plate     thymeandlove.com

Lime Tamales are a traditional sweet tamal. For vegan sweet tamales, we use vegan butter and almond milk. A few easy swaps and traditional sweet Lime Tamales can be made vegan! You can find the recipe HERE.

14. Sweet Pineapple Tamales

Pineapple tamal on a black and white plate with a silver spoon      chefmarcela.com

Sweet Pineapple Tamales, soft and billowy and perfectly sweet and completely addictive. The masa is made with coconut oil, and vegetable shortening and studded with crushed pineapple. Find the recipe HERE.

15.  Strawberry Tamales

A pink tamal surrounded by strawberries on a blue plate.                                                        dorastable.com

These strawberry tamales are soft, tender packets of ground corn, filled with sweet strawberry jam. The aroma of the tamales steaming is irresistible. They are great with a mug of Mexican hot chocolate or an atole. Find the recipe HERE.

16. Pumpkin Pie Tamales

Pumpkin pie tamal bathed in syrup on a white plate     thymeandlove.com

Pumpkin Pie Tamales are a sweet dessert tamal inspired by the classic American Pumpkin Pie. Perfect for Dia de Los Muertos or Thanksgiving! Find the recipe HERE.

17. Vegan Chocolate Tamales

chocolate tamales on a blue kitchen towel      dorastable.com

These vegan chocolate tamales are filled with bittersweet chocolate chips, and chopped pecans. The best tamal is a warm tamal just out of the steamer with the scent of cinnamon and the melted bittersweet chocolate. Find the recipe HERE.

18. Vegan Tamales Unwrapped

vegan tamales ebook

You didn’t find the recipe you were looking for?? Vegan Tamales Unwrapped Ebook has over 50 detailed pictures, and will guide you step-by-step in the tamal making process. Make delicious savory and sweet tamales inspired by traditional Mexican cuisine, but all vegan and gluten-free. Including an oil-free option for making guilt-free plant-based tamales. You will be able to find recipes like jackfruit in salsa verde tamales. mushroom mole tamales, rajas con crema tamales, and blackberry tamales. Find out more HERE

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

It’s the irresistible aroma of chocolate and cinnamon that I first think of when I’m offered hot chocolate. Mexican hot chocolate is not your ordinary cacao powder and milk, oh no, and somebody needs to say this, but adding cinnamon to your hot chocolate does not make it Mexican. It is one of my culinary pet peeves. So what are the best vegan Mexican chocolate brands and what makes them so different?

Find out which is the best Mexican hot chocolate.

 

Not only that it comes from Mexico, but the process used to make it is unique in itself. Mexican chocolate for beverages is sold in tablets not powder, it is made by toasting, and grinding cacao beans with sugar, vanilla, and cinnamon. It is then packed into a mold and formed into a tablet. To make into a beverage simply dissolve a couple of pieces of the tablet in hot milk. If the chocolate is of high quality you can dissolve it in water, milk is not necessary. The video below, from Saveur.com shows you exactly how chocolate tablets are made in Mexico.

 

 

The Best Vegan Brand of Mexican Chocolate

There are four Mexican chocolate brands most commonly available in the US: Abuelita, Ibarra, Hernan, and Taza. We tested all four of them for you with Almond-coconut milk.

These Mexican hot chocolate popsicles (paletas de chocolate) are creamy and sweet, chocolaty and rich, with a touch of cinnamon.

Best Overall:

Hernan Mexican hot chocolate is made with stone-ground ORGANIC cocoa beans from a bio-diversified plantation in Chiapas. It is made in Mexico and imported into the US. I found Hernán to have the most authentic flavor and quality. It has a strong chocolate flavor, but it is not overpowering. It is the tight amount of sweet, and the foam is thick and a bit airy. It contains only four ingredients: cacao beans, sugar, cinnamon, and soy lecithin. The downfall is that it is available mostly online and in select stores. The price is reasonable for the quality of the chocolate at $10 for a box of 6 tablillas (6 cups of hot chocolate).

 

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Second Best: Taza Chocolate 

Taza is produced here in the US using the same process described in the video above. It is intensely chocolaty, aromatic, not too sweet, but with a hint of bitterness. The foam is thick, not at all airy. It contains only three ingredients: cacao beans, sugar, and cinnamon. It is also certified USDA organic, non-GMO, certified gluten-free, and vegan. The only downside is the price, $5.oo. It really isn’t too expensive, but one package will only make you two cups of hot chocolate.

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Best Budget-Friendly Chocolate: Ibarra

Ibarra is the one we buy more often, and it is a Mexican product. It has a medium chocolate flavor intensity and it is pretty sweet. There is no bitterness to it at all. The foam is airy and firm. It contains cocoa liquor, sugar, soy lecithin, and cinnamon flavoring. The price, $3.50, and it makes 24 cups of hot chocolate.

What is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate? This taste test will decide once which one makes the best cup of steaming hot chocolate.

Last but Not Least: Abuelita

I contacted Nestle and they confirmed that it is NOT vegan.

NOTE: Even though Nestle has said that the product is not vegan certified, there are no animal products on the ingredient list. After further inquiry this is what Nestle responded: “The evaluation for vegan claims has not been performed on this item. We therefore would advise that the product is not suitable for vegans.” 

I leave it up to yo whether you want to try it or not. That being said, Abuelita has a special place in my heart, it evokes a lot memories for me and it is extremely popular in Mexico. It has a medium chocolate flavor, is very sweet, and has no bitterness. The cinnamon flavor is strong and fragrant. The foam is airy and very firm. The downside is that it contains additives like vegetable oils, artificial flavor, and PGPR. The price, $3.25, and it makes 24 cups of chocolate.

Regardless of which one you think is the best vegan brand of Mexican chocolate, I urge to give Mexican hot chocolate a try. You won’t be disappointed. What is your favorite brand?

 

 

 

 

 

The Day of the Dead is a celebration of life, and a mocking of death and the power it holds over us. The indigenous people of Mexico believed that death was not an end, but a passageway to another life. El Día de los Muertos is a homecoming festival, where we receive our loved ones with open arms, and party like only Mexicans now how to, with food, color, music, and dance.

 

Altars are used to honor those that have departed, and there are many traditional elements that must come together to create an altar worthy of our ancestors. One of these elements are candy skulls.The use of sugar or amaranth skulls can be traced back to pre-hispanic times, and historians believe that human blood might have been used to form the amaranth skulls. Today you can find colorfully decorated skulls made out of sugar, honey and amaranth, and chocolate and amaranth.

Over the years I have slowly found ways to veganize some of our food traditions. We have made vegan pan de muerto, sugar skulls, and candied pumpkin. This year we made vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls, which are decorated with colorful royal icing, are very easy to do, and are quite delicious! Unlike the sugar skulls which are used mostly for decorations, these are meant to be eaten.

To make these you will need a skull mold, vegan semi-sweet chocolate chips, and popped amaranth. You can pop the amaranth yourself, or you can buy it already popped. I found mine at a Mexican candy store and ended up buying way too much! The chocolate takes about 30 minutes to set, and they hold for up to 3 days if you store in an air tight container.

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate and Amaranth Skulls

For the vegan chocolate you can use the enjoy life brand which is certified vegan or Guittards, if none of those are available in your area, there are other options. I bought my skull molds on mexicansugarskulls.com. Enjoy!

Vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls for the day of the dead with colorful royal icing, very easy to do, and are quite delicious!
5 from 2 votes
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Vegan Chocolate and Amaranth Skulls

Vegan chocolate and amaranth skulls for the day of the dead with colorful royal icing, very easy to do, and are quite delicious! 
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 4 large skulls (front only)
Author Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Vegan Semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 3 1/4 cups Popped amaranth

Royal Icing

  • 3 floz. Aquafaba (liquid from a can of chickpeas) (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp.)
  • 4-5 cups Powdered sugar
  • 4 Food coloring of choice

Equipment

  • 1 Skull mold
  • 4 Pieces of cardboard (4.5 X 4.5 inches)
  • 4 Disposable piping bags

Preparation

  1. Place the chocolate chips in a large bowl and melt over a double boiler until all the chocolate has melted. You can also melt it in 30 sec. intervals in the microwave, making sure to stir between each interval.

  2. Pour popped amaranth into the bowl with the chocolate and mix well. with a wooden spoon, to incorporate.

  3. Wet the mold a little bit with a moistened paper towel and press the amaranth chocolate mix into the mold. 

  4. Press the cardboard square against the mold and flip the mold, to have the skull facing you. Lift the mold, and carefully place the cardboard with the skull on it on a sheet tray.
  5. Repeat this process with the rest of the mix. Let chocolate set for 30 min.

Royal Icing

  1. While de chocolate is setting, in a large bowl, lightly beat the aquafaba until it starts to bubble. Add 4 cups of the powdered sugar and mix well. Test the consistency of the icing on a plate. It should be thick enough that it doesn’t slide down the plate easily. If it seems too thin, add 1 more cup of powdered sugar. The consistency should be considerably thicker than the icing used to decorate cookies.

  2. Separate the icing into 4 small bowls. Add your food coloring of choice and mix well.
  3. Pour each bowl of icing into a disposable piping bag. Secure with a rubber band, and cut a tiny bit off of the tip of the bag. Test the amount of icing that comes out before decorating your skull.
  4. Decorate your skull however you desire. The icing will take about 30 min. to set.

Chef's Notes

For the vegan chocolate you can use the enjoy life brand which is certified vegan or Guittards, if none of those are available in your area, there are other options. I bought my skull molds on mexicansugarskulls.com.

You can pop the amaranth yourself, or you can buy it already popped.

 

 

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Yes! These pancakes are stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries, spiced with Mexican cinnamon, and drizzled with maple syrup. They are one of our favorite pancakes in our house, and they are vegan and refined sugar-free.

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

My 7 yr. old asked me, very seriously the other day, if I could teach him how to cook. I replied with an enthusiastic: ” Sure!”, but the truth is I’m not sure. Of course he needs to learn how to cook, it’s an invaluable life skill that will serve him well his whole life, but does he really need to learn now? What if he loves cooking? What if he loves cooking so much that he wants to be a chef? No!!!

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

The life of a chef is anything but easy. There’s long hours of physically demanding work, and an incredible amount of pressure and stress. Not to mention the high cost of culinary school and the low pay. Don’t get me wrong, I love what I do, if I had to do it over again I would probably choose to go to culinary school once more, but sometimes I wonder if I should’ve chosen a career in tech or anything else for that matter. At the end of the day though, what career he chooses is not up to me.

So I decided to let him do something easy, like pancakes. I gathered all the ingredients for him, but he had to measure them  out and do the hard work of mixing the batter. Pouring the batter into than pan and flipping the pancake was his favorite part, and after wiping down all the flour and cocoa powder that was sprinkled on the counter, he ran off to play legos like making pancakes in the morning was the most natural thing in the world. Before leaving though, he turned around and said, ” Can we put the pancakes on Dora’s Table?” So here they are, Tommy’s vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes.

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes

I have used a combination of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour, but you can do use just one of them without a problem. If you are doing no-oil, substitute it for unsweetened apple sauce. Enjoy!

Fluffy and rich vegan chocolate strawberry pancakes for breakfast? Stuffed with thinly sliced strawberries and drizzled with maple syrup!!
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Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes

Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword chocolate and strawberry, vegan pancakes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 10 Pancakes
138 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 tbsp. Flaxseed, ground
  • 1/4 cup Maple syrup
  • 2 tsp. Apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Water
  • 2 tbsp. Coconut oil (sub unsweetened apple sauce)
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup All-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup Whole wheat flour
  • 3 1/2 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 tsp. Ground Mexican cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup Cocoa powder, unsweetened
  • 1 cup Thinly sliced strawberries

Preparation

  1. In a small bowl combine the almond milk, ground flaxseed. Mix well, and let rest for 5 minutes. 

  2. Add vinegar, water, vanilla extract, and oil (or applesauce) to the almond milk mixture. Whisk to incorporate.

  3. In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and cocoa powder. 

  4. Make a well in the center of the flour bowl and add liquid mixture. Whisk until a lumpy batter forms. Let rest for 10 min.

  5. To cook pancakes, heat a skillet to medium-low heat and grease lightly. Pour batter onto pan and place 3 strawberries on the pancake batter. Use a spoon to spread some of the batter on top of the strawberries to cover them. Let cook for about 3 min. or until fluffy and golden brown.

  6. Flip and cook pancake on other side for 3 more minutes.

  7. Repeat with the rest of the batter. 

  8. Serve with maple syrup.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

I have used a combination of whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour, but you can do use just one of them without a problem. If you are doing no-oil, substitute it for unsweetened apple sauce.

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Chocolate Strawberry Pancakes
Amount Per Serving (1 Pancake)
Calories 138 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g 6%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Sodium 132mg 6%
Potassium 312mg 9%
Total Carbohydrates 23g 8%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 3g 6%
Vitamin C 10.3%
Calcium 13.3%
Iron 8.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Hola! I am Jeni from the blog Thyme & Love and I am so excited to be writing a guest post here on Dora’s Table! Before I share my recipe for these delicious and easy Vegan Tequila Truffles, I thought that I would give a little background about myself and my recipe inspiration.

These Vegan Tequila Truffles are rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple. They are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.

I first discovered authentic Mexican food when I started dating my Husband Hector, who is from Mexico City. I immediately feel in love with the cuisine and culture of Mexico. I grew up in the Midwest and ate a pretty typical American diet. There wasn’t much variety and we never had true authentic Mexican food. I learned a few recipes and the basics of Mexican cuisine from Hector’s Mom Adela. Since I was already Vegan when I met Hector I began to research Mexican recipes that were naturally Vegan or that could easily be made Vegan.

 

These Vegan Tequila Truffles are rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple. They are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.

I love traveling to Mexico as much as I can, especially to Mexico City. It is the first place that I visited in Mexico and it holds a special place in my heart. After Hector and I got married, we decided to move to Mexico City for awhile. It was one of the greatest experience of my life. On my blog, you’ll find that many of my recipes are inspired by Mexico.

Now, let’s talk about these Vegan Tequila Truffles. When Dora asked me to share a holiday recipe with you, I immediately knew that I wanted to share a Mexican inspired truffle recipe. Truffles are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.

These Vegan Tequila Truffles are rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple. They are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.

The Recipe: Vegan Tequila Truffles

The truffles start by melting dark chocolate in warmed coconut milk. You want to look for chocolate that is at least 70% cacao. After most of the chocolate has melted, the rich ganache is infused with Mexican vanilla and tequila. It is completely optional but for a little kick add chili powder to the ganache. I like to use guajillo chili powder.

After chilling the fridge for a few hours, the truffles are rolled into balls and then coated in cocoa powder.

You’ll find these Vegan Tequila Truffles to be rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple.

These Vegan Tequila Truffles are rich, creamy, chocolaty and simple. They are easy to make and perfect for the holiday season.
5 from 1 vote
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Vegan Tequila Truffles

Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 5 minutes
Author Jeni Hernandez

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Coconut milk, full fat
  • 12 oz. Vegan Dark Chocolate at least 70% Cacao, finely chopped
  • 1 pinch Sea Salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Mexican Vanilla Extract
  • 2 tbsp. Tequila
  • ¼-½ tsp. Chili Powder, optional
  • 1/4 cup Cocoa powder, for dusting

Preparation

  1. In a medium saucepan heat the the coconut milk over medium heat. When the milk comes to a low boil add the chopped chocolate and continually stir until about ¾ of the chocolate has melted. Turn off the heat and add the pinch of salt, vanilla, tequila and chili powder if using. Keep stirring until all of the chocolate has melted. 

  2. Pour the chocolate into a loaf pan or shallow dish. Refrigerate for 2 hours, or until the chocolate is almost solid. If the chocolate is still wet in some spots continue chilling until firm. 

  3. Once the chocolate is chilled and firm, prepare a dish with the cocoa powder for rolling. Use a tablespoon sized scoop to scoop out small balls; I like to use a cookie scoop. Scoop out the tablespoon size balls then gently use your hands to roll into a round ball shape. Toss in cocoa powder to coat and shake off the excess. Transfer to a cookie sheet or pan lined with wax paper. Continue until all the chocolate has been scooped out. Depending on the size of the scoop, you should get about 14-16 truffles. 

  4. Enjoy the truffles right away or store in a tightly covered container in the fridge. Let the truffles come up to room temperature before serving, about 10-15 minutes. 

Chef's Notes

It is completely optional but for a little kick add chili powder to the ganache. I like to use guajillo chili powder.

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

It’s that time of year again when the cold starts creeping in and we yearn for a nice mug of hot chocolate and a tamal. If you have never tried a sweet tamal you are in for a treat.  These vegan chocolate tamales are made by beating vegan butter and sugar, adding corn masa flour, ground Mexican chocolate, cinnamon, and warm almond milk. It is filled with bittersweet chocolate chips and chopped pecans. The best tamal is a warm tamal just out of the steamer, and the scent of cinnamon and the melted bittersweet chocolate interior of this tamal will surely conquer your taste buds.

Masa for tamales in a silver bowl

 

 

We love tamales in this house both savory and sweet. Our favorites are the red chile jackfruit tamales, potato adobo tamales, and strawberry tamales. We love them so much that two years ago I self-published an ebook to help you make all kinds of vegan tamales. The book is called Vegan Tamales Unwrapped and contains over 18 different vegan tamal recipes for you to enjoy this Christmas season, with a step-by-step picture guide to making the dough, wrapping the tamales, and placing them in the steamer. The recipes include both savory and sweet tamales.

This vegan latino gift guide is inspired by our love of Latino culture, they are made or curated by Latino business owners and entrepreneurs.

Recently, while doing some research on tamales I read that there is very little evidence that tortillas were part of the Mayan diet, at least not until 900 AD. However, tamales can be found in the Aztec and Maya civilizations as far back as 7000 BC according to their hieroglyphs. It is thought that they were often carried by warriors, hunters, and travelers since they are the perfect portable food individually wrapped in corn husks. Who would have thought???

tamales chocolate

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Tamales

  • If you would like to make these tamales with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa.
  • I used Ibarra chocolate for this recipe, but there are many other vegan options. 
  • You can also make these with coconut oil or vegetable shortening.
  • If you would like to make these without fat, use unsweetened pumpkin puree to replace the fat.
tamales chocolate
5 from 1 vote
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Vegan Chocolate Tamales

Vegan Chocolate tamales filled with roasted pecans and chocolate chips.

Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword chocolate, pecans, vegan tamales
Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 40 minutes
Servings 18 tamales
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (8 oz.) Vegan Butter, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup Sugar, granulated
  • 4 cups (1 lb. 2oz) Masa harina
  • 1.5 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 1/2 cups (9 oz.) Mexican chocolate, ground
  • ½ tsp. Cinnamon, ground
  • 2 cups Almond Milk, unsweetened, warm
  • 2 cups Water, warm
  • ½ cup Pecans, chopped
  • 2 cups Chocolate chips, bittersweet
  • 30 Corn husks dried

Preparation

To prepare the husks:

  1. Soak the corn husks in hot water, in a large pot or in your kitchen sink. Place a plate over them to weigh them down so they are completely submerged. Let them soak for at least an hour.

To make the dough:

  1. Chop the Mexican chocolate into small pieces and grind to a powder in the food processor. If you don’t have a food processor, you can grate the chocolate with a standard kitchen grater.
  2. Beat the butter and sugar, on medium-high speed, with an electric mixer, until the butter has doubled in size and is nice and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the Mexican chocolate, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, and beat for 1 minute to incorporate into the butter.
  3. Add half of the masa harina then add the almond milk. After it is completely incorporated, add the other half of masa harina and water. Beat at low speed, until thoroughly mixed. It should have the consistency of a thick cake batter. If necessary add more water until you reach that consistency.
  4. For lighter and fluffier tamales, let the dough rest for an hour in the refrigerator. Remove the dough from the fridge and rebeat it, adding enough liquid to get it to the consistency it had before.
  5. Remove the corn husks from the water and set on paper towels.

To set up the steamer:

  1. Fill the bottom with water making sure the water is not touching the steamer rack. Line the rack and sides of the steamer pot with corn husks. Set aside.

To wrap the tamales:

  1. Pull 24 pencil thin strips off of the corn husks and set aside. Take a husk and dry off the excess water on it with a paper towel. Place the husk in your hand with the tapered side away from you and the smooth side up. Using a spoon, spread 2-3 tbsp. of the dough (¼ inch thick) onto the corn husk, forming a 3 - 4 inch square. Leave a border of at least 3/4 inch on each side of the square.
  2. Place 5-10 chocolate chips, and a sprinkle of chopped pecans in the center of the dough. Bring the two long sides of the corn husk together, this will cause the masa to surround the filling, and roll them in the same direction around the tamal. (If the husk is too small, fold one of the long sides towards the center, and then fold the other long side on top.) Fold down the empty tapered section of the corn husk, forming a closed bottom. This will leave the top of the tamal open. Tie with a corn husk strip to secure the bottom of the tamal.
  3. Place the tamal in the steamer vertically leaning against the side of the steamer, with the folded part of the tamal on the bottom. Repeat this process until you run out of dough and all the tamales are in the steamer. Cover them with a layer of corn husks. If the steamer is not full, fill the empty spaces with more corn husks. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and cook for 40 minutes. Check the tamales, when they separate easily from the corn husk it means they are done. If they are not done, steam for 10 more minutes and check again.
  4. Remove steamer from the heat and let sit covered for 10 minutes. Uncover and let cool. Don’t be alarmed if the tamales seem really soft. As they cool, they will firm up.

Recipe Video

Chef's Notes

If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa. You can also use 8 oz. of coconut oil or 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin to replace the fat.

 

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