Posts

Barbacoa means so many different things to different people, as with any other Mexican dish it varies from state to state. This traditional vegan barbacoa Sinaloense uses Gardein beefless tips instead of pork or beef, but still holds all the chiles, spices, and flavors that characterize barbacoa in Sinaloa. 

Glass bowl filled with gardein beefless tips soaking in water

It is a hearty stew full of vegetables like potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, and olives simmered in a mixture of Anaheim, chile guajillo, cumin, oregano, and beer. In Sinaloa, it is served with cold macaroni salad and refried beans.

Stainless steel pot filled with dried chiles and water

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

White pot with onion, tomato, and anaheim chile.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Sinaloa, is the creation of the talented Fabby Gastelum, and here she is sharing her story with us.

White pot with onion, carrots, tomatoes, and anaheim chile.

Fabby’s Story:

Hi my name is Fabiola Gastelum and I was born in Culiacán Sinaloa. My family and I moved here when I was 7 years old, we lived in Mesa Arizona and I spent all my childhood there. That’s Home! I currently live in Albuquerque New Mexico with my toddler and my husband.

Small saute pan with browned beefless tips

Growing up I remember hating the feeling of knowing where my food came from. I would cry after every zoo trip thinking of the animals incarcerated there. I always considered myself a “tree hugger” because I hated plastic and I would try and safe water. When I became a mother I became so conscious of what products I used on my son -all-natural plant-based products. He never had cow milk and very little red meats. I remember watching What The Health for the first time on August 2017 (knowing that I would come out of it feeling different) that day our lives changed.

Vegan barbacoa sinaloense in a blue and white pot with a wooden spoon in it

My inner wish of always wanting to be vegetarian finally made it out. And by vegetarian I mean growing up I watched a kids show where one of the girls was an animal activist and I dreamt of having her courage to fight for animal rights. Our vegan journey began 1 week after that. We stopped buying, wearing, eating and exploiting animals. As much as I wished our journey would have come sooner I’m happy to say we are one big happy vegan family! I have not left my culture, my food or my identity. I’m a true Sinaloense and I will continue to veganize my states dishes! #LosVeganosComenMejor

Vegan barbacoa sinaloense on a white plate with macaroni salad and refried beans, and flour tortillas

The Recipe: Vegan Barbacoa Sinaloense

  • If you can’t find Gardein beefless tips you can use mushrooms, TVP or seitan or your favorite meat substitute.
  • If you can’t find no-chicken or no-beef bouillon cubes you can use vegetable stock instead of water.
  • Adding beer is very common in the state of Sinaloa and I wanted to make this as traditional as possible. Yes it’s safe for children since it’s only a small amount and the alcohol taste disappears with all the other spices. I added Michelob.
  • The beefless tips are already seasoned, I didn’t want that flavor to overpower the barbacoa. I washed them very well and added a squeeze of lime juice and let it rest for 15 mins with lime juice and water. It helped, and the “meat” got the original taste of the barbacoa spices added but this is totally optional
A closeup of a flour tortilla scooping up vegan barbacoa sinaloense from a white plate
Vegan barbacoa sinaloense on a white plate with macaroni salad and refried beans

Vegan Barbacoa Sinaloense

This traditional vegan barbacoa Sinaloense uses Gardein beefless tips instead of pork or beef, but still holds all the chiles, spices, and flavors that characterize barbacoa in Sinaloa.
0 from 0 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: gardein beefless tips, sinaloa, vegan
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 422kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 package Gardein Homestyle Beefless Tips *see note
  • 5 Small russet potatoes (about 4 cups diced potatoes)
  • 5 Small carrots (about 1 ½ cups diced Carrots)
  • 3 Small tomatoes (about 1 ¼ cup diced tomato)
  • 1/4 White onion (about 1/3 cup diced onion)
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 1 Anaheim chile, fresh
  • 5 Guajillo chiles, dried
  • 1 Pinch Cumin (about 1/4 tsp.)
  • 2 Not Beef Bouillon Cubes
  • 1 Not-Chick’n Bouillon Cube
  • 1 tsp. Dried oregano
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup Manzanilla olives
  • 2 Bay leaves, dried
  • 1/4 cup Preferred beer, *see notes

Instructions

  • Fill a medium pot with water and bring to a boil. Add guajillo chiles and let simmer slowly for 5 – 8 minutes to soften the chiles.
  • Continue by dicing tomato, anaheim chile and onion in to very small-fine pieces.
  • Heat a large pot to medium-low heat and add 1 tsp. oil (optional). Add onion, Anaheim chile, and tomato and sweat for 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender,
  • Meanwhile chop carrots and potatoes into small-medium chunks. Add only carrots and olives to pot; cover and continue to cook for another 3-5 mins.
  • When guajillo chiles have softened, drain, and place in the blender with 1 cup of water, garlic, cumin, dried oregano, and a pinch of salt and black pepper, blend till smooth.
  • Take that chile mixture and strain it, add strained liquid to pot and simmer for another 5 mins
  • Add potatoes and both not-beef cubes, 1 chkn cube and 2 bay leaves. Increase heat to medium, cover, and keep cooking for another 10 mins depending how soft or hard you like your potatoes to be. (If necessary add more water.)
  • Heat a sauté pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tsp. of oil. Add beefless tips and brown them on both sides until golden brown.
  • Add the beefless tips to the pot with the vegetables, add another 2 cups of water, and ¼ cup of beer. Stir and let cook on low heat for 5 more mins. (You can add more than 2 cups of water. Today I did because I wanted my barbacoa to have plenty of broth. Add as much or little as you like.)
  • 1Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Turn off heat, make some frijoles puercos and sopa fria to go with it and voilà

Notes

*The beer is only for a different kick on the taste of this barbacoa, in Sinaloa (my Mexico native state) adding some beer to it is very common and I wanted to make this as traditional as possible. Yes it’s safe for children since it’s only a small amount and the alcohol taste disappears with all the other spices. I added Michelob. (of course I drank the remaining of it #bosslife #momlife #winning)
*The beefless tips are already seasoned, I didn’t want that flavor to overpower the barbacoa. I washed them very well and added a squeeze of lime juice and let it rest for 15 mins with lime juice and water. It helped, and the “meat” got the original taste of the barbacoa spices added but this is totally optional

Nutrition

Calories: 422kcal | Carbohydrates: 71g | Protein: 20g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 635mg | Potassium: 1708mg | Fiber: 11g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 14753IU | Vitamin C: 36mg | Calcium: 100mg | Iron: 4mg

This vegan Matamoros style seafood stew is a spicy, tangy, and hearty stew of oyster mushrooms, chickpeas, hearts of palm, and corn simmered in a chile-tomato broth. It is served with chopped cilantro, a splash of lime juice, and tostadas.

Dulse flakes, garlic, oregano, and chile powder in a large pot

This stew is somewhat similar to the caldo de siete mares, which is a classic Mexican seafood soup. This version besides being vegan, is delicious and full of a wide variety of vegetables. It gets its fishiness from dulse flakes, which are sun-dried seaweed flakes rich in fiber, protein, vitamin B12, and omega-3.

(Matamoros is a city in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. It is a border town with Brownsville, TX and it is located 28 miles from the coast of the gulf of Mexico.)

Tomato and guajillo chiles added to the pot with the dulse flake mixture

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Tamaulipas, is the creation of the talented chef Eddie Garza from @theeddiegarza and here he is sharing his story with us.

Eddie’s Story:

Every November I celebrate my veganiversary. This year, I’m celebrating my Sweet Sixteen! It’s been an amazing journey.

I was born and raised in the South Texas border town of Brownsville, right across the Rio Grande River from Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico. My hometown slogan is “On the border, by the Sea.” And as the slogan suggests, Mexican style seafood a big part of the culture. Unfortunately, chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease caused by obesity is also a big part of the culture.

Blender container with blended chile sauce for vegan seafood stew

Like many of my classmates, I was a chubby kid. And every year I got bigger and bigger. By the time I finished high school, I weighed close to 250 pounds. For a 5’7” 18 year-old, that’s a lot. But it didn’t stop there. I finally maxed out at 310 pounds and I was always sick and injured (because my ankles couldn’t keep up with my rapid weight gain). I hit my rock bottom when I was diagnosed as prediabetic right after college.

Pot filled with sauteed mushrooms, carrots, celery, and onion

Thankfully, things turned around for me after meeting a new friend who taught me how to feed myself better. I began eating less of the fatty meat-centric meals that were harming my body and eating more fruits and vegetables. After 5 years of trying to go fully vegan, I finally did it. And I lost 150 pounds along the way. Now, 16 years later, I feel better than ever! And what’s really amazing is that I still get to enjoy all the same flavors I loved growing up on the SoTex-Mex border in a healthy plant-based way.

vegan seafood stew in a large pot. A ladle dunk in to show the stew

Today, I’m delighted to share a veganized version of one of our fall family favorites. It’s a Matamoros style seafood stew that features hearts of palms, oyster mushrooms, and chickpeas instead of sea animals. What gives this lip-smacking stew it’s sea-like flavor is dulse seaweed, which I love using for all my plant-based seafood dishes. I hope you love it as much as I do. ¡Buen provecho!

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro

The Recipe: Matamoros Style Seafood Stew

  • If you can’t find dulse flakes, you can use ground up nori seaweed.
  • Potatoes make a great addition to this!
  • You can also add zucchini or chayote.
  • Any mushroom would do, but preferably try to find oyster mushrooms.
  • Serve with tostadas.

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro

A white and blue bowl filled with vegan seafood stew surrounded by lime, chiles, and cilantro

Matamoros Style Seafood Stew

This vegan Matamoros style seafood stew is a spicy, tangy, and hearty stew of oyster mushrooms, chickpeas, hearts of palm, and corn simmered in a chile-tomato broth. It is served with chopped cilantro, a splash of lime juice, and tostadas.
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free, veganmexican
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings: 8 people
Calories: 207kcal
Author: Eddie Garza

Ingredients

  • 8 Dried guajillo chiles, soaked, seeded and chopped
  • 2 tbsp. Vegetable oil divided
  • 4 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ tbsp. Dried Mexican oregano
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • ½ tsp. Black pepper
  • 2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 2 tsp. Ancho chile powder
  • 1 tsp. Chipotle powder
  • 2 tbsp. Dulse flakes
  • 4-5 Roma tomatoes roasted and peeled
  • 8 ounces Tomato sauce
  • 2 Carrots diced medium
  • 1 Medium onion diced medium
  • 3 Stalks celery diced medium
  • 8 ounces Oyster mushrooms separated
  • 4 cups Vegetable stock
  • 14 ounces Hearts of palm, half diced in rings, half julienned
  • 4 ears Fresh corn on the cob broken into halves
  • 1 ½ cups Chickpeas, cooked
  • ½ cup Cilantro, chopped (garnish)
  • Lime wedges (garnish)

Instructions

  • Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large soup pot, and sauté the garlic, oregano, salt, pepper, cumin, ancho chile powder, chipotle powder, and dulse flakes for 3 minutes. Add the rehydrated guajillo chiles, tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Purée the mix (the soup base) with an immersion blender (or in batches with a conventional blender). Transfer the soup base to a bowl and set aside.
  • In the same pot, heat 1 tablespoon of oil on medium heat and sauté the carrots, onions, celery and mushrooms for 4 minutes. Return the soup base to the pot. Add the vegetable stock, and cook for 10 minutes.
  • Add the hearts of palm, corn on the cob and chickpeas. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
  • Serve hot, garnished with cilantro and lime wedges.

Notes

  • If you can’t find dulse flakes, you can use ground up nori seaweed.
  • Potatoes make a great addition to this!
  • You can also add zucchini or chayote.
  • Any mushroom would do, but preferably try to find oyster mushrooms.
  • Serve with tostadas.

Nutrition

Calories: 207kcal | Carbohydrates: 35g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 930mg | Potassium: 1487mg | Fiber: 7g | Sugar: 16g | Vitamin A: 4815IU | Vitamin C: 14.4mg | Calcium: 83mg | Iron: 4.4mg

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce. The combination of chile ancho, chile guajillo, oregano, a pinch of cumin, and garlic add a smoky and savory flavor to the stew. This dish is inspired by a very northern dish called guisado de puerco in chile colorado. I have of course left out the pork and used a combination of potatoes and chickpeas. It is best served with rice, beans, and warm tortillas.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

I know working with dried chiles can be intimidating at first, but it is quite easy. All you have to do is remove the stems and take out the seeds. They can be slightly toasted to bring out the smoky flavor of the chiles, but it is not necessary to do so. To use them you have to first reconstitute them in hot water. Simple drop the deseeded chiles in nearly boiling water and let them sit for about 10 minutes or until they are soft and pliable. They can be found in your local hispanic market or now most grocery stores carry them in their hispanic sections.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

We have been in Hawaii 7 months now!! Can you believe it? I can’t. I think it has taken me this long to really appreciate the beauty of Hawaii, its people, and culture. We recently travelled to the Big Island for a small 3 day vacation.The Big Island is so different from Oahu, less crowded, but there are not as many restaurants and shops as Oahu.  We had the opportunity to stay at the Four Seasons Hualalai and it was amazing! We had been so stressed out with homeschooling, the blog, my husband working a ridiculous amount of hours, that this is just what we needed. The ambience at the hotel was completely peaceful and relaxing, the hotel itself is beautiful, and the restaurants quite good. The only thing that was disappointing is that they did not have many vegan options. Sometimes it can be such a drag to have to request special meals all the time, it would be nice if there was at least a couple of vegan options on the menu. We also celebrated our 8 year anniversary there, and got a babysitter so we could go out to dinner. It’s amazing how a couple of hours away from the kids, and the stress can put things into perspective. Hopefully one day we can visit another one the Hawaiian islands.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

The Recipe: Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower would also be a great addition to this dish.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

This sweet potato and chickpea stew combines sweet potatoes, yukon gold potatoes and chickpeas in a classic chile colorado sauce.

Sweet Potato and Chickpea Stew in Chile Colorado

5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Ancho chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 4 Guajillo chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 1 Tomato, medium
  • 5 cloves Garlic
  • 1 tsp. Oregano, dried
  • 1 Bay leaf, dried
  • 1/2 tsp. Cumin, ground
  • 1 cup Onion, white, minced
  • 1 ½ cups (1 large) Diced Sweet Potato
  • 1 cup (1 medium) Diced Yukon gold potato
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Chickpeas, drained
  • 2 Thyme sprigs
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Instructions

  • Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add chiles, tomato and bay leaf and turn heat down to a slow simmer. Let simmer for 10 minutes.
  • While the chiles are simmering, heat a large pot to medium heat and add ¼ cup of water. Add onion and sweat until tender and translucent, about 4 minutes.
  • Add potatoes and 1 cup of vegetable stock. Cover and let simmer for about 6 min or until potatoes are tender.
  • Strain the chiles, but reserve one cup of the chile soaking liquid. Place the drained chiles, garlic, tomato, oregano, cumin, and 1 cup of the chile soaking liquid in the blender and blend until smooth. Strain the sauce.
  • Add sauce, chickpeas, and sprigs of thyme to the pot with the potatoes. Let simmer slowly for 8-10 minutes. If the sauce is too thick, add more vegetable stock accordingly.
  • Season with salt and pepper. Remove thyme sprigs before serving.
  • Serve with rice, beans, and warm corn tortillas.

Notes

Instead of sweet potatoes you could use russet, yukon gold or any other type of potato. The chickpeas could be substituted with any other bean. Cauliflower would also be a great addition to this dish.

 

 

Pozole is a hearty, spicy, satisfying Mexican soup. It is said to be a hangover cure, which I cannot confirm, but it is certainly a special occasion dish and is often served on Christmas and New Year’s. There are three varieties most commonly served: rojo, verde y blanco. Traditionally pozole is made with pork shank, trotters and shoulder, but of course, this will no longer work for us, so I have created this jackfruit vegan pozole rojo recipe just for you.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This is an adaptation of my grandmother’s famous recipe. Every Christmas for as long as I can remember my grandmother would make two of the biggest pots of pozole and menudo I have ever seen. The adults would salivate over it, talk about how good it was going to be, and would go over to the kitchen and stir the pots to see how much longer it would be until they finally had their pozole. One year I decided I was going to see what the big deal was, and I waited until the kitchen was empty. Then I went over to the pot and grabbed the ginormous ladle. I gave the whole thing a stir and almost fainted and threw up all over myself at the same time! (I must have been about 8 yrs. old.) When I stirred the pot a couple of pork trotters rose up to surface and I swear I saw a pig snout, but I might of imagined that. After that, it took me years to give pozole a try, but I eventually became one of those salivating adults waiting for the pozole to be done each Christmas.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

Now that I no longer eat meat it was only natural that I made a vegan version of this dish. Originally, I was going to make this with mushrooms instead of jackfruit, since I know jackfruit is not easily accesible to many. However, when I went to the grocery store I discovered that here in Hawaii button mushrooms are $8.00 a pound! I quickly decided instead to pay about $5 for two cans of green jackfruit. I am so happy with the result and I know you will be too. It is just as I remember it, so deeply satisfying.

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

The Recipe: Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

I have used canned hominy to speed things up, but if you have access to dried hominy you can use that instead. (Dried hominy takes about 2 hours to cook.) Pozole is all about the toppings. Serve with dried oregano, diced white onion, lime wedges, sliced radishes, and shredded cabbage. My grandma used to serve a salsa macha on the side as well for the ones who wanted more heat. Here is a recipe from Mexico in my Kitchen that is very similar to my grandma’s, only she used chile piquín instead of árbol. Enjoy!

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

This jackfruit vegan pozole is a hearty, spicy, and satisfying soup. It is an adaptation of my grandmother's recipe, perfect for the holidays

Jackfruit Vegan Pozole Rojo

Vegan Jackfruit Pozole Rojo, a spicy soup made with dried chiles, hominy, jackfruit, and veggies. 
4.58 from 38 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: jackfruit, vegan pozole
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 can (29 oz.) White hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 3 quarts Vegetable Stock
  • 5 Chile guajillo, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 2 Chile ancho, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 5 Chile de árbol, dried, stemmed and seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • ½ Onion, white
  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil (optional)
  • 2 cans (20oz./ea) Young green jackfruit brine, drained
  • 1 Zucchini, medium, cut into dice

Toppings

  • 1 White onion, small, minced
  • 6 Red radishes, sliced into batons
  • 2 tbsp. Oregano, dried
  • ½ Green cabbage, cored, thinly sliced
  • 4 Limes cut into quarters
  • 1 bag Corn chips or tostadas

Instructions

  • In a large pot, combine the vegetable stock and hominy and bring to a LOW simmer.
  • While the hominy is simmering, remove stems and seeds from the chile ancho, arbol, and guajillo. Rinse and place in a medium pot with water.
  • Bring pot to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 min.
  • Drain chiles, but reserve 1 ½ cups of the chile water. Place chiles, garlic and onion in the blender, add the chile water and blend until smooth. Strain.
  • To prepare the jackfruit, drain the jackfruit, rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes on each side or until it begins to brown. Pour the chile sauce over the jackfruit and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 10 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Your hominy should still be simmering very slowly. Scoop out one cup of the hominy-vegetable stock mixture and blend until smooth. Pour this back into the pot with the hominy
  • Raise heat to medium-low, and add the zucchini and shredded jackfruit with sauce. Let simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until the zucchini is tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 
  • Serve your pozole with all of the toppings on the side.

Video

Notes

If you don’t have access to jackfruit you can use 2lbs. of mixed mushrooms or soy curls instead. You can substitute the zucchini with chayote with excellent results. If you like your pozole really spicy serve it with this salsa macha from Mexico in my Kitchen