Vegan Mexican Recipes easy to follow, delicious, and healthy.

These vegan cauliflower tempura bites (cauliflower tortitas) in a tomato-chipotle sauce are one of my favorite lent side dishes. Traditionally the tortitas are dropped in an egg batter and fried, but for this version of the batter, I’ve essentially made an eggless tempura batter. The tomato-chipotle sauce gives this dish the acidity and spiciness that pairs very well with the crunchiness of the cauliflower

Every time lent and Easter comes around I get very homesick. Holy Week and Easter are a big deal in Mexico and our family has a set of traditions we practice every year. Every Friday in lent we enjoy comida de cuaresma(lent food) which includes things like tortitas de camaron, lentejas, caldo de mariscos, shrimp cocktails, capirotada, tortitas de coliflor, tortitas de papa, etc. I can’t get those things around here, or at least I haven’t found a place that serves traditional lent food, so I’ve adapted some of these dishes to be vegan.

This recipe for vegan cauliflower tempura bites in a spicy tomato-chipotle sauce is a satisfying and crunchy dish. The batter has no eggs!

This recipe for vegan cauliflower tempura bites in a spicy tomato-chipotle sauce is a satisfying and crunchy dish. The batter has no eggs!

One of the other traditions that we really enjoy and we can do here is Mexican confetti eggs. I’ve been saving my eggs since February and we’ve already started painting some. It’s so fun to watch the kids smash the eggs on each other’s heads and the colorful confetti jump out every where. Now all I have to do is find a family who will adopt us for Easter since the hubby is working. Sigh.

This recipe for vegan cauliflower tempura bites in a spicy tomato-chipotle sauce is a satisfying and crunchy dish. The batter has no eggs!

This recipe for vegan cauliflower tempura bites in a spicy tomato-chipotle sauce is a satisfying and crunchy dish. The batter has no eggs!

Enjoy!

The Recipe: Vegan Cauliflower Tempura Bites in Tomato Chipotle Sauce

Cauliflower tortillas are cauliflower tempura bites in a spicy chipotle-tomato sauce.

Vegan Cauliflower Tempura Bites

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Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

Batter

  • 1 cup AP Flour
  • 1 cup Cornstarch
  • 1 ½ cups Soda water
  • 1 tsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 Cauliflower, large, cut into florets
  • 2-3 cups Vegetable oil

Sauce

  • 1 can (14.5 oz.) Diced tomatoes
  • 2 cloves Garlic, peeled
  • ¼ Onion, chopped
  • 1 Chipotle pepper in adobo (1 pepper)
  • ½ cup Vegetable stock

Instructions

  • Place all the ingredients for the sauce in the blender and process until smooth.
  • Bring sauce to a simmer in a sauce pot set to medium heat. Simmer for 5-7 minutes, season with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  • Sift the flour and cornstarch into a large bowl. Add the salt and soda water. Whisk until combined. The batter should have the consistency of a thick pancake batter. Add more water as necessary.
  • Heat oil in a large pot or Dutch oven to 350°F.
  • Once the oil is hot, use your hands to drop the cauliflower in the batter and then into the oil. Fry for 2-3 min. on each side or until the batter is crispy and slightly golden.
  • Remove from oil and place on a plate or tray lined with paper towels. Serve with spicy tomato sauce.

Notes

For a healthier version, season the cauliflower with salt, pepper and 1 tbsp. of oil. Roast the cauliflower in the oven at 450F for 20 min.

 

 

I am in love with this watercress and radish salsa. I guess it’s more of a salad with the addition of the radish and watercress, but it pairs so perfectly with the slices if avocado and home-made tortillas. I made a batch if this and ate it all by myself!

Tomatoes, serrano chiles, radishes, green onion and watercress on white table

I’ve adapted this recipe for watercress and radish salsa from a book called Memorias en Mole de Olla, Cocina y Revolucion en Tlaxcala. The author, Helena Hernandez de Valle Arizpe, has researched and gathered over 117 recipes of the cuisine of Tlaxcala during the time of the Mexican revolution (1910-1920). Her only intent is to promote her findings in the hope of preserving Mexico’s cuisine. Unfortunately, for you English speakers the book is in Spanish.

Four molcajete bowls with different stages of salsa preperation

That’s where I come in. I have translated this goodness and adapted it slightly. I love recipes like these, because they reflect exactly what I want this blog to be. I don’t just want to veganize traditional Mexican dishes. I want to share with you recipes that although they may be accidentally vegan (meaning they don’t come from a vegan mindset, they just happen to have no animal products), they are part of the fabric of traditional Mexican cuisine. With the advent of Tex-Mex or the adaptation of Mexican food across borders we tend to forget that the basis of the whole cuisine is corn, beans, and chile.

watercress and radish salsa in molcajete with green onions on white table

Hopefully I will be able to share with you more recipes from this great book. In other news, I’m really excited about being featured in PETALatino this month. Head on over there and check it out. Look out for some classic lenten recipes in the following weeks, and don’t forget to email subscribe to receive a notification every time a new post is published and our monthly newsletter.

The Recipe: Watercress and Radish Salsa

Is it a salsa or a salad? It’s both! Four serranos make a very spicy salsa, so if you want it mild add a little bit less. Enjoy!

molcajete with salsa with radishes, green onion, avocado and watercress on table

Watercress and Radish Salsa

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Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 15kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 3 Roma tomatoes, large
  • 4 Serrano peppers
  • 1 bunch Watercress, roughly chopped
  • 6 Red radishes, cut into matchsticks
  • 3 Mexican spring onions, white part only, chopped, cebollitas

Instructions

  • Heat a griddle or cast iron pan to high heat. Place tomatoes and serrano peppers on griddle until they become soft and slightly blackened, about 5 min.
  • Flip peppers, tomatoes, and continue to char for another 5 minutes.
  • Remove ingredients from griddle and set aside.
  • Start grinding the peppers in the molcajete one at a time. Once the desired consistency is reached, add the tomatoes one by one and keep grinding. Set aside
  • If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place the charred tomatoes and peppers in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. Set aside.
  • Add radish, watercress, and spring onion to the tomato and serrano salsa. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Serve with avocado slices and warm tortillas.

Notes

Yields about 2 cups. Mexican spring onions are very different from scallions. They have a bulbous ending and a very long green stem. See ingredient picture above. Feel free to add more serranos if you want this to be spicier.

Nutrition

Calories: 15kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 9mg | Potassium: 188mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 733IU | Vitamin C: 14mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1mg

 

 

 

 

 

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

Last week the hubby worked mornings and my schedule was thrown way off. Hence my posting until now. Baby Karina is refusing to nap for more than 20 min. at a time, that and cleaning. Ugh, does the cleaning ever end? What’s up with boys and not aiming? I can’t get the smell of pee out of my bathroom! It’s been a tough week guys, but look at this sweet face. She’s lucky she’s so cute.

photo-3

I think I’ve come to the realization I can only post one day a week. I’m trying, I really am, but life is kind of hectic when you have two little ones. Also, at the end of the night, after my kids are asleep, and the house is quiet, all I want to do is have a cold beer and watch some TV.

This recipe for chile morita salsa is a smoky and tangy combination of tomatillos, chile morita, garlic, and onion.

The Recipe: Chile Morita Salsa

Looks like I’ve gone on a bit of a rant there. What were we supposed to be talking about? Salsa, oh yeah, that’s right. We are really enjoying all the salsa making going on in this house. We’ve gone through 3 huge bags of chips in the last two weeks. This salsa is a little bit different than your average grocery store find. It’s a chile morita salsa and it is very smoky and tangy. When you smell these chiles the first thing you’ll think about is BBQ. So think sweet, smoky, and spicy. There’s also roasted tomatillos, garlic, and onion. Oh, and did I mention it’s super easy to make? Enjoy!

 

This recipe for chile morita salsa is a smoky and tangy combination of tomatillos, chile morita, garlic, and onion.

 

Chile morita salsa

Chile Morita Salsa

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Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 1 cup
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. (about 8 ea.) Tomatillos, husks removed
  • ¼ Onion, white, peeled
  • 2 cloves Garlic (not peeled)
  • 6 -8 Chile moritas dried. seeded
  • To taste Salt and Pepper

Instructions

  • Turn oven broiler on HI.
  • Place tomatillos, onion, and garlic cloves on a sheet tray lined with parchment paper.
  • Broil in oven for 10 min. The tomatillos will begin to blacken and soften. After the first 10 min. remove the garlic and set aside.
  • Flip the tomatillos and the onion over. Put back in oven. Broil for 10 more minutes.
  • Boil water in a small sauce pot. Take the stems off of the chiles and remove the seeds. Add chiles to the boiling water and turn down to a simmer. Let simmer for 15 min. Drain and set aside.
  • If using a blender, place all the ingredients in blender until you have reached the desired consistency.
  • If using a molcajete, start off by peeling the garlic and grinding it to a paste with the salt. Add the onion and continue to grind to a paste. Add the chiles and continue to grind. By now you should have a thick red paste.
  • Add the tomatillos one at a time and keep on grindin’ until the skins dissolve. At this point if the salsa is too thick you can add a little bit if water to loosen it up. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes

If you don't want to use the oven you can blacken the tomatillos on a comal or griddle.

 

 

Salsa month continues here at Dora’s Table. This is pico de gallo, a raw salsa that consists of jalapeño, tomato, onion, cilantro, and lime juice. That’s it! This is one of the first things I learned how to make. It really isn’t complicated at all, just chop the tomatoes, onion, jalapeño, and cilantro, add some lime juice, and season with salt and pepper. Done! It is great on its own with chips or you can make it a meal by adding chickpeas and avocado. 

pico de gallo

Sometimes I wish I could convince everyone I meet to at least try going vegan (plant-based) at least for 30 days. I was the last person you could think of that would become vegan. I was a meat lover through and through, and don’t even get me started on cheese. In fact, I made fun of vegans and vegetarians. We once invited our one vegetarian friend to eat at Animal in L.A. Yikes!

Being vegan in the food and beverage industry is not perceived as cool, I would say most professionals would think it’s pretty lame. You know, because vegans don’t indulge in the foie gras, and chocolate dipped bacon wrapped everything that has been going on lately. I admit I thought about it that way too.

I was embarrassed to be a vegan at first. I tried to hide it or avoid mentioning it all together, but as I learned how to adapt in social situations and plan my meals better I began to care less and less what others thought of me. As you can see from my now very public vegan blog.
james beard quote

Honestly, I just feel better when I drop meat and dairy from my meals. I have more energy, I’m back to my pre-baby weight, and I can eat guilt-free. I was a bit chunky as a kid and eating was always associated with guilt. Even after a lost all my weight I couldn’t shake the guilt, not until going vegan. For me it is about being compassionate towards animals, and taking care of my body and myself. Am I 100% vegan? no. I don’t think anybody is.

The funny thing is I don’t feel deprived at all because I can’t eat this or that. Just like James Beard says, “You can omit and still enjoy eating.” I enjoy all of my meals whether or not they are organic, non-gmo, raw, vegan, paleo, etc. Life is too short to eat bad food.

pico de gallo

Stop by my pinterest page for some vegan recipes from around the web.

Also take one look at Kathy Patalsky‘s Finding Vegan so you can see that you can eat healthy, delicious, and even indulgent meals without a trace of animal products.

Finally, subscribe to our email list (top right corner below the slide show) to receive updates, cooking tips and behind the scene photos. Enjoy!

The Recipe: Pico de Gallo

Add more jalapeño to this to make it extra spicy. To make this a quick lunch add 1 cup of chickpeas and some avocado.

A fresh salsa so easy to make.

Pico de Gallo

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Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Plum tomatoes. diced
  • ½ White onion, chopped finely
  • 1 Jalapeño, do not remove seeds, minced
  • 1 Juice of lime

Instructions

  • Combine all ingredients, add lime juice, season with salt and pepper.

Notes

Add more jalapeño to make it extra spicy.

 

 

I hereby declare February national salsa month! Wait, I just googled it and national salsa month is a real thing, and it’s in May. Oh well, here at Dora’s Table February is salsa month. This whole month I will be posting salsa recipes for you to enjoy. Let’s start with this roasted tomatillo salsa.

Mexican mortel and pestel

Ingredients for roasted tomatillo salsa.

The reason I decided to make this month salsa month is, because I bought a molcajete!! I am so excited about this. I’ve been meaning to purchase one for years, but every time I visit Mexico I decide not to. Those things are heavy and can break so I’ve never wanted to risk it. I finally just went to Williams-Sonoma and bought one. Why Williams-Sonoma? Well that’s another story that requires a blog post all to itself.

Tomatillos roasting for salsa.

Tomatillos roasting

I know it’s silly but every time I use it, I feel somehow connected to my past and heritage. I can’t stop myself at marveling at the fact that the indigenous cultures of Mexico used this exact same tool in their cooking thousands of years ago. I honestly didn’t expect a huge difference in flavor than when I use my blender, but I was pleasantly surprised. The result is a chunky, rustic salsa with bright and strong flavors. The recipes I will be posting will be made using the molcajete, but you can easily prepare them in your blender or food processor.

Salsa in molcajete.

Roasted tomatillo salsa.

In other news, it’s been sick week here at the Stone house. Everybody has been taking turns getting sick, and we’re all exhausted. Hopefully baby Karina will be sleeping normally soon, and everything will be back to normal. Otherwise things are great. We finally went to Legoland with some friends, and we had a blast. My two little ones are growing so fast, and they are keeping me infinitely distracted with their cuteness.

karina

legoland1

 

I’ve been dedicating some extra time to grow my pinterest page, so stop by and check it out: http://www.pinterest.com/dorastable/

I’ve also started a Vegan Mexican pinterest board. If you would like to join, shoot me an email and let me know: dora.l.stone@gmail.com

One last thing. I will begin sending out a monthly newsletter with cooking tips, my favorite recipes, and other news. To receive this newsletter simply subscribe to the blog via email by clicking on the subscribe button on the right side of the home page. Enjoy!

The Recipe: Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

If you do not have a molcajete to make this roasted tomatillo salsa you can use a blender or food processor. Also, if you do not have a comal or cast-iron pan you can use the broiler in your oven. Just put the tomatillo, onion, chile, and garlic on a tray and place under broiler until they are blackened.

Roasted tomatillo salsa. Chunky, rustic, spicy, and tangy.

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

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Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 1 1/2 cups
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. (8 medium) Tomatillos, husks removed, washed
  • ¼ Onion, white
  • 3 Garlic, cloves
  • 2-4 Serrano Peppers
  • 1 tbsp. Cilantro, chopped

Instructions

  • Heat a comal, cast-iron, or heavy bottomed pan to medium-high heat. Place the tomatillos, garlic, onion, and Serrano peppers directly on the hot pan. They will become soft and slightly blackened, about 7 – 10 min.
  • Flip tomatillos, peppers, onion, and garlic over and continue to char for 10 more minutes.
  • Remove ingredients from griddle and set aside.
  • Start grinding ingredients in molcajete one at a time. Once the desired consistency is reached, add the next ingredient and keep grinding. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
  • If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached.
  • Season to taste.

Notes

If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor.

 

I have a confession to make. This is kind of embarrassing, but I’m going to tell you anyway. I have a huge culinary crush on Rick Bayless. Why am I telling you this? Well, because to make these potato gorditas I didn’t make my own salsas.

I bought the tomatillo salsa and the double roasted tomato salsa. The Frontera brand is named after Rick Bayless’s restaurant in Chicago. When I graduated school I applied for a job at his restaurants, but there were no positions available. Then a couple of years later, Thomas and I went to the James Beard Awards in NY and he was there!

This vegan recipe for potato gorditas is easy to make! Gorditas are a type of corn griddle cakes that you can stuff with almost anything.

 

Oh my gosh I can’t believe I’m going to tell you the next part, but here it goes. I wanted to go up to him and just introduce myself and say thank you for everything he’s done for Mexican cuisine in this country, but I didn’t want to be lame. The people at the James Beard Awards are mostly all restaurant professionals, it’s not the kind of party where you ask people for autographs. So instead I just kind of followed him around for a little bit, at a distance of course, while I gathered enough courage to do the grown-up thing and casually introduce myself. I couldn’t do it. Maybe next time, Rick Bayless, maybe next time.

This vegan recipe for potato gorditas is easy to make! Gorditas are a type of corn griddle cakes that you can stuff with almost anything.

The Recipe: Potato Gorditas

Anyway, the salsas are really good and he also has some other products as well. Back to the recipe. Sheesh! These gorditas are the real deal. They’re easy to make and they’re gluten-free. I love my gorditas with cheese, but in this case we’ve filled them with potatoes in salsa verde and salsa roja. Gorditas are actually my go-to easy family dinner. Whatever you do, do not go to Taco Bell and try their gorditas, just don’t. Serve these with more salsa and guacamole. Enjoy!

This vegan recipe for potato gorditas is easy to make! Gorditas are a type of corn griddle cakes that you can stuff with almost anything.

Corn gorditas stuffed with potatoes in tomato and tomatillo salsas. A vegan recipe.

Potato Gorditas

5 from 1 vote
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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 12 gorditas
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Russet potatoes, peeled, cut into small dice
  • 2 cups Maseca* corn masa flour.
  • ¼ tsp. Salt, kosher
  • ¼ tsp. Baking powder
  • 2 ¼ cups Warm water
  • 1 cup Salsa Verde, or your salsa of choice
  • 1 cup Salsa Roja, or your salsa of choice
  • 1 tbsp. Vegetable oil Optional

Instructions

  • Place potatoes in a pan with cold salted water, bring to a boil and immediately turn heat down to a simmer. Cook potatoes until fork tender, about 15 min. Drain potatoes and set aside.
  • Meanwhile, in a large bowl combine the masa flour, salt, and baking powder. Pour in 1 ¾ cups of warm water. Mix with your hand. The dough should be the consistency of soft playdough. If it is too dry add more water, until you reach the desired consistency. Cover with a moist paper towel and let rest 5 min.
  • Set a large sauté pan to medium heat and add 1 cup of salsa verde. Bring to a simmer and add half of the potatoes. Stir to coat potatoes with sauce. Season and remove from heat. Repeat these steps with a different pan, the rest of the potatoes, and the salsa roja.
  • Uncover your dough and divide it into 2oz. balls. You will be able to make about 12ea. Place on a surface covered with plastic wrap. Flatten the balls with your hands to make a round patty about 1/3 in. thick. Continue this process with the rest of the balls.
  • Set a large cast-iron pan, comal or griddle to medium-high heat. Add 1 tbsp. of oil (optional). Once the oil is hot add the masa rounds and let cook for 3 min. and then flip. Let cook for 3 -4 min more until brown spots appear on the gordita and it is hard to the touch.
  • Repeat with the rest of the rounds. Then, using a sharp serrated knife cut a slit in the edge about half-way around its circumference, making a sort of pocket. Fill each gordita with the desired potato mixture. Serve with sliced avocado or guacamole.

Notes

These gorditas can also be fried in a shallow pan with oil at 350F. Fry 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown, then cut, and fill.

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This recipe for Noche Buena salad or Mexican Christmas Eve Salad is a classic in every Mexican household. Ok, maybe not in every Mexican household but it´s a pretty popular Christmas recipe. It brings a little bit of healthy into an otherwise indulgent season. Think of it as a palate cleanser, with the earthiness of the roasted beets, the sweetness of the apple, and the acidity of the orange and pomegranate your body will be thankful for some light fare.

I spent the last two weeks running around like crazy. I made over 200 tamales to sell! With the packing and the school recital and everything else, the making of the salad kind dropped down to the very bottom on my to do list. Even with all the craziness, I’m glad I get to share this recipe with you.

This vegan recipe for Noche Buena salad or Mexican Christmas Eve salad has crisp lettuce, apples, oranges, jicama, beets, and pomegranates.

The kiddos and I are enjoying our time at my mom’s house, of course we are being spoiled silly. My grandmother passed away a couple of months ago, so even with the joy of being together there is still a hint of sadness. This will be our first Christmas without Güeli. My heart goes out to all of you who might be grieving the death of a loved one this Christmas. We will try to focus instead on the beautiful smiles of children on Christmas morning, the good food, and the birth of a baby unlike any other who came into this world to bring us joy. Merry Christmas!

The Recipe: Noche Buena Salad

It is thought that this recipe or variations of it have been around since the 1830’s. It is a true Mexican classic. You can also use boiled or canned beets. If you do not want to make your own dressing, this salad will pair really well with balsamic vinaigrette.

This vegan recipe for Noche Buena salad or Mexican Christmas Eve salad has crisp lettuce, apples, oranges, jicama, beets, and pomegranates.

This vegan recipe for Noche Buena salad or Mexican Christmas Eve salad has crisp lettuce, apples, oranges, jicama, beets, and pomegranates.

Noche Buena Salad

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Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4 Servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 2 hds. Romaine chopped
  • 3 Beets, medium, roasted or steamed cut into slices
  • 1 cup Jicama cut into matchsticks
  • 3 Oranges cut into supreme
  • 1 Apple, sliced
  • ¾ cup Pomegranate, seeds
  • 1/3 cup Peanuts, roasted, chopped

Dressing

  • 1/3 cup Orange juice fresh
  • ¼ cup Vinegar white
  • 1 clove Garlic minced
  • 2 tbsp Olive oil optional

Instructions

  • Toss the chopped romaine with the rest of the ingredients, or arrange the ingredients on top of the lettuce.
  • To make the dressing whisk the orange juice, vinegar, and garlic together. Slowly add the oil and continue whisking. Season with salt and pepper. Pour over salad.

Notes

You can also use boiled or canned beets. If you do not want to make your own dressing, this salad will pair really well with balsamic vinaigrette.

 

 

Christmas is so close and you can’t have Christmas without baking cookies. Here is a recipe for coconut shortbread cookies filled with a chocolate ganache. They are also known as garabatos or scribble cookies. These cookies are very popular in Mexico city, and you will fall in love with them too. Who can resist two coconut shortbread cookies, sandwiched in a smooth chocolate filing, and drizzled with warm chocolate? The best part, they’re 100% vegan.

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I love mole, but it takes quite a while to make and it requires so many ingredients. What if I told you that you could make it in under 40 minutes? That’s right 40 minutes and vegan! This recipe for enmoladas de plátano macho, otherwise known as plantain mole enchiladas, combines the spiciness and richness of mole, with the sweetness of a garlic-plantain mash.

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Prickly pear juice is made from a fruit native to Mexico and South America, but it can be found in France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Egypt, and parts of the Middle East. It is known for its thick spiny skin and soft, sweet, & watery interior. There are many varieties, but the most well known are green, red, yellow, brown and pink. It’s the perfect summer fruit, it tastes like a weird combination of pear, cucumber, watermelon and pineapple. It has only one monstrous defect, besides the tiny spines that line its exterior, the flesh of the fruit is riddled with seeds. It is commonly used to make drinks, candy, or jelly.

You can find them at your local Mexican or Hispanic market. I found them at my favorite grocery store, Crown Valley Market Place in Mission Viejo or you can find them at El Nopal Market in San Juan Capistrano. They are in season from early spring to late fall.

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