Vegan Mexican Recipes easy to follow, delicious, and healthy.

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It’s that time of year again when the cold starts creeping in and we yearn for a nice mug of hot chocolate and a tamal. If you have never tried a sweet tamal you are in for a treat.  These vegan chocolate tamales are made by beating vegan butter and sugar, adding corn masa flour, ground Mexican chocolate, cinnamon, and warm almond milk. It is filled with bittersweet chocolate chips and chopped pecans. The best tamal is a warm tamal just out of the steamer, and the scent of cinnamon and the melted bittersweet chocolate interior of this tamal will surely conquer your taste buds.

Masa for tamales in a silver bowl

 

 

We love tamales in this house both savory and sweet. Our favorites are the red chile jackfruit tamales, potato adobo tamales, and strawberry tamales. We love them so much that two years ago I self-published an ebook to help you make all kinds of vegan tamales. The book is called Vegan Tamales Unwrapped and contains over 18 different vegan tamal recipes for you to enjoy this Christmas season, with a step-by-step picture guide to making the dough, wrapping the tamales, and placing them in the steamer. The recipes include both savory and sweet tamales.

This vegan latino gift guide is inspired by our love of Latino culture, they are made or curated by Latino business owners and entrepreneurs.

Recently, while doing some research on tamales I read that there is very little evidence that tortillas were part of the Mayan diet, at least not until 900 AD. However, tamales can be found in the Aztec and Maya civilizations as far back as 7000 BC according to their hieroglyphs. It is thought that they were often carried by warriors, hunters, and travelers since they are the perfect portable food individually wrapped in corn husks. Who would have thought???

tamales chocolate

The Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Tamales

  • If you would like to make these tamales with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa.
  • I used Ibarra chocolate for this recipe, but there are many other vegan options. 
  • You can also make these with coconut oil or vegetable shortening.
  • If you would like to make these without fat, use unsweetened pumpkin puree to replace the fat.
tamales chocolate

Vegan Chocolate Tamales

Vegan Chocolate tamales filled with roasted pecans and chocolate chips.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chocolate, pecans, vegan tamales
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 40 minutes
Servings: 18 tamales
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (8 oz.) Vegan Butter, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup Sugar, granulated
  • 4 cups (1 lb. 2oz) Masa harina
  • 1.5 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 1/2 cups (9 oz.) Mexican chocolate, ground
  • ½ tsp. Cinnamon, ground
  • 2 cups Almond Milk, unsweetened, warm
  • 2 cups Water, warm
  • ½ cup Pecans, chopped
  • 2 cups Chocolate chips, bittersweet
  • 30 Corn husks dried

Instructions

To prepare the husks:

  • Soak the corn husks in hot water, in a large pot or in your kitchen sink. Place a plate over them to weigh them down so they are completely submerged. Let them soak for at least an hour.

To make the dough:

  • Chop the Mexican chocolate into small pieces and grind to a powder in the food processor. If you don’t have a food processor, you can grate the chocolate with a standard kitchen grater.
  • Beat the butter and sugar, on medium-high speed, with an electric mixer, until the butter has doubled in size and is nice and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the Mexican chocolate, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, and beat for 1 minute to incorporate into the butter.
  • Add half of the masa harina then add the almond milk. After it is completely incorporated, add the other half of masa harina and water. Beat at low speed, until thoroughly mixed. It should have the consistency of a thick cake batter. If necessary add more water until you reach that consistency.
  • For lighter and fluffier tamales, let the dough rest for an hour in the refrigerator. Remove the dough from the fridge and rebeat it, adding enough liquid to get it to the consistency it had before.
  • Remove the corn husks from the water and set on paper towels.

To set up the steamer:

  • Fill the bottom with water making sure the water is not touching the steamer rack. Line the rack and sides of the steamer pot with corn husks. Set aside.

To wrap the tamales:

  • Pull 24 pencil thin strips off of the corn husks and set aside. Take a husk and dry off the excess water on it with a paper towel. Place the husk in your hand with the tapered side away from you and the smooth side up. Using a spoon, spread 2-3 tbsp. of the dough (¼ inch thick) onto the corn husk, forming a 3 - 4 inch square. Leave a border of at least 3/4 inch on each side of the square.
  • Place 5-10 chocolate chips, and a sprinkle of chopped pecans in the center of the dough. Bring the two long sides of the corn husk together, this will cause the masa to surround the filling, and roll them in the same direction around the tamal. (If the husk is too small, fold one of the long sides towards the center, and then fold the other long side on top.) Fold down the empty tapered section of the corn husk, forming a closed bottom. This will leave the top of the tamal open. Tie with a corn husk strip to secure the bottom of the tamal.
  • Place the tamal in the steamer vertically leaning against the side of the steamer, with the folded part of the tamal on the bottom. Repeat this process until you run out of dough and all the tamales are in the steamer. Cover them with a layer of corn husks. If the steamer is not full, fill the empty spaces with more corn husks. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and cook for 40 minutes. Check the tamales, when they separate easily from the corn husk it means they are done. If they are not done, steam for 10 more minutes and check again.
  • Remove steamer from the heat and let sit covered for 10 minutes. Uncover and let cool. Don’t be alarmed if the tamales seem really soft. As they cool, they will firm up.

Video

Notes

If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa. You can also use 8 oz. of coconut oil or 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin to replace the fat.

 

Something strange is happening in our house. Our 6 yr old, Dylan, has been asking what vegan is. My husband is an omnivore, so I cook 3 vegan meals, 3 non-vegan meals and we eat out one day a week. We don’t really use labels with our food, so the kids don’t think about our meals as vegan or non-vegan. They will eat almost anything, as long as it’s good.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

He has been hearing the word vegan a lot though, because of the blog, and my husband constantly asking if something I have prepared is vegan (possibly with a grimace on his face). I don’t want Dylan to think of vegan food as different or worse than other food, so I have been naming some of his favorite foods and letting him know they are vegan. He loves tofu! When he asked me what vegan was, the best explanation I could give him was that it was food that came from plants, not animals. He kind of nodded and moved on to the next distracting thing in his path.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

Now that the WHO (World Health Organization) has stated that processed meats can cause cancer, it is more important than ever to demistify plant-based food and show others, especially our children, how great you can feel from eating it and how delicious it can be.

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

The Recipe: Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

This is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. A cinderella pumpkin is cut into thick wedges, and simmered slowly in piloncillo, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel. Once the pumpkin is soft and tender, it is drizzled in its own syrup. Traditionally it is served with milk, but this version is topped with decadent coconut whipped cream. Enjoy!

This recipe for Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha), is another great dish you can prepare for the Day of the Dead celebration. The pumpkin

candied pumpkin (calabaza en tacha)

Candied Pumpkin (Calabaza en Tacha)

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Prep Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 10 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 small (4 -5 lbs.) Cinderella pumpkin
  • 1 lb. Piloncillo, (2 cones)
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick
  • 1 Clove, whole
  • 1 strip Orange peel
  • ¾ cup Water

Instructions

  • Place the piloncillo, water, cinnamon, clove, and orange peel in a large pot or dutch oven set to low heat. Let the piloncillo slowly dissolve, stir frequently.
  • In the meantime, rinse the pumpkin well to remove any dirt. With a small knife cut a circle around the stem of the pumpkin. Almost like you are carving a jack-o-lantern. Remove the stem and pull out the seeds and flesh attached to it. Leave the rest if the seeds and flesh inside.
  • Following the natural vertical grooves of the pumpkin, cut it into wedges from top to bottom. The wedges should be about 2 ½ “ wide x 3 “ long. You do not need to remove the seeds, but you can if desired. Score the skin of the pumpkin wedges with a small knife to help them absorb the syrup.
  • Once the piloncillo has completely dissolved, remove the pot from the heat and layer the pumpkin wedges skin side down on the bottom of the pot. Once you have covered the bottom of the pot completely, add a second layer of pumpkin wedges flesh side down, so that the pumpkin is touching flesh to flesh.
  • Cover the pot and set it to medium- low heat. Let the pumpkin simmer for 1½ hours. Don’t worry about not having enough liquid in the pot. As the pumpkin cooks it will release a large quantity of water.
  • Uncover the pot and let simmer for ½ hour more or until the pumpkin is a dark brown color and is completely submerged in the syrup. Take off the heat and let cool.
  • Serve hot or cold and top with coconut whipped cream. (see note)

Notes

If you cannot find Cinderella pumpkins, use a sugar pumpkin instead. Here is  a super easy recipe for coconut whipped cream.
 
 

 

Who knew death could be so colorful? Purple and orange tissue paper banners line altars decorated with marigold petals, colorful sugar skulls, and a bounty of fruit and vegetables. This is a celebration of life and triumph over death, the intermingling of the religious beliefs of the indigenous people of Mexico and the faith of the Spaniards that conquered them. The Day of the Dead is not only a holiday that honors those who have left us, but it is believed that on that special day the souls of the dead return to visit the living. Both the indigenous people and the Church of the Spaniards believed that death was not an end, but only a passageway to another life. That is why this is a joyous occasion, a homecoming festival, and at the same time a way to mock death and the power it holds over our bodies.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores, the Aztecs held rituals for the dead during the summer months in a joint celebration with the first days of harvest. The dead were traditionally buried with rich offering of ceramics, personal objects, and food. The offerings where meant to assist them in their journey to the afterlife. After the arrival of the Catholic missionaries their traditions and beliefs were merged with those of the indigenous people, and the festivities were moved to coincide with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, Nov 1st and Nov 2nd.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

 

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

The festivities have evolved over the years and differ from region to region. Some of the most popular ones include altars in honor of loved ones who have passed, preparing the dead’s favorite foods, and gathering at the cemetery to decorate a loved one’s grave, share a meal and reminiscence. My favorite tradition is the elaboration of the altars. The symbolism incorporated into the altars is so rich and meaningful that it truly honors the dead, those we keep in our hearts, but somehow with the passing of time fade in our memories.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Every altar has several key symbols which are:

water– as an offering to the soul to quench their thirst in their long journey

salt– as a symbol of purification and to preserve the body so it will not wither

fire– to represent the light of the faith and guide the spirits in their journey

incense– to elevate our prayers to God in heaven

flowers– marigolds, their color represents the radiance of sunlight and life

bread– as a symbol of the body of Christ, usually round loaves with topped with “bones” and known as pan de muerto

a picture of the person who the altar is dedicated to

religious images– to symbolize God as an intermediary between the living and the dead

the favorite foods and drinks of the departed– to delight the souls who will be visiting (the most common being Mexican hot chocolate, tequila, atole, mole, tortillas and rice

candy skulls– the indigenous held the skull as symbol of death being a part of life

tissue paper banners– purple to symbolize christian mourning and orange to symbolize Aztec mourning

fruits and vegetables– an offering from the earth

personal objects of the person being honored– to accompany them on their journey back

a dog– to protect and guide the spirits.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Every year we make an altar in our home to a loved one lost. It is our own special way of introducing our deceased loved ones to our children. We talk about the things that they liked to eat, do, and why they are important to us. On November 2nd we say a prayer for them, and keep hoping for the day we will be reunited in the afterlife. For years now, we have also been attending the Day of the Dead Festival in Oceanside, CA. The festival takes place in the Mission San Luis Rey. There are a variety of traditional foods such as tamales, tacos, tortas, aguas frescas, and pan de muerto. There is also face painting, sugar skull decorating, and regional dances. However, the highlight of the festival is the showcase of the altars, some representing various Mexican states and built by whole communities and families.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Out of all the wonderful Mexican traditions, the Day of the Dead might be the one that still holds firm to its pre-Hispanic roots. The loved ones lost, who we cannot see or hear, make themselves present in our homes, share our food, and partake in the rejoicing of life and the conquest of death.

Sources:

Los Dias de Los Muertos, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian and National Museum of American History, 2010

Simbolismos en el altar del Dia de los Muertos, Tanatologa Aida Maria Castro Morales, 2007 (http://www.slideshare.net/internatoni/simbolismos-en-el-altar-del-da-de-muertos)

The Recipe: Vegan Day of the Dead Bread (Pan de Muerto)

This recipe might be better than the non-vegan version, according to my husband. I have substituted the eggs with potatoes, resulting in a moist, soft, and sweet bread. It is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate or coffee.

pan-de-muerto2

Bake at 350F for 40- 45 minutes. Brush with butter and sprinkle with sugar.

pan de muerto

 

pan de muerto

Vegan Day of the Dead Bread

This vegan day of the dead bread or pan de muerto is tender, sweet, and delicious. Perfect for dipping on hot chocolate.
4.5 from 2 votes
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: day of the dead, pan de muerto, vegan
Prep Time: 1 day
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 day 45 minutes
Servings: 4 loaves
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 pack (.25 oz) Active dry yeast
  • ½ cup (3.5 oz) Almond milk, room temperature, 3.5 oz
  • 3 1/3 cup (17.5 oz) Bread flour
  • ¾ cup (5.5 oz) Sugar, granulated
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Orange zest
  • ¼ cup Orange juice
  • ¾ cup (6 oz.) Potato, Yukon gold, cooked, mashed
  • ½ cup + 1 tbsp. (4 ¼ oz.) Vegan butter room temperature, cut into 1 inch pieces,

Topping

  • 2 tbsp. Vegan butter, melted
  • ½ cup Sugar, granulated

Instructions

  • In a medium bowl, dissolve the yeast in the almond milk and add 2 tbsp. of the flour. Whisk to incorporate and let rest in a warm place for 20 min.
  • In the bowl of a mixer, with the dough hook, combine the dry ingredients: the rest of the flour, salt, sugar, and orange zest. Mix.
  • Add the wet ingredients: the orange juice, mashed potato, and yeast-flour mixture. Mix on low until the dough begins to incorporate.
  • Add the ½ cup + 1 tbsp. of softened butter little by little and increase speed to medium. Mix for 15 min. until the dough has come off the sides of the bowl and is stretchy but not sticky.
  • Place the dough in a large oiled bowl, cover with a towel and let rise for 1 to 1 ½ hours, or until doubled in size. Punch down the dough and fold the side over unto each other and flip. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  • The next day take the dough from the fridge, remove the plastic wrap and cover with a towel. Let rise in a warm place (70-75F) until the dough comes to room temperature, about an hour.
  • Take a piece of dough, weighing about 3 oz., and set aside. Divide the remaining dough into four pieces. Roll them tightly into rounds and place on a sheet tray lined with parchment. Press down on the rounds lightly.
  • Use the reserved dough to make 4 small balls the size of a quarter and set aside. Use the remaining dough to roll out eight strips long enough to cover the rounds. Place two strips on top of each round forming an x, use your fingers to press lightly on the strips to form knobs, they should resemble bones. Repeat the process with the rest of the rounds.
  • Cover with a towel and let rise for 1 ½ hrs. in a warm place (70- 75F) or until double in size.
  • Meanwhile preheat the oven to 350F. Place the small balls in the center of the rounds with a little bit of water. Bake for 20-30 min. until the rounds have become a rich brown color. Cover with foil and bake for 10 to 15 min. more, until the bread reaches an internal temperature of 190F. Remove from the oven and let cool on a rack.
  • While the bread is still warm melt 2 tbsp. of butter and brush the bread with it. Sprinkle evenly with sugar.
  • Let bread completely cool before eating.

Video

Notes

My favorite vegan butter is Earth Balance. This recipe is a combination of my dad’s recipe and Fanny Gerson’s method for Pan de Muerto in My Sweet Mexico.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Aguachile is traditional Mexican dish, similar to ceviche, served on the coast of Mexico. It is usually made with shrimp. If you had been wondering how to make aguachile vegan look no more. For this vegan version I have used hearts of palm as the main ingredient. The tanginess of the lime intermixes with the spiciness of the serranos, and the crunchiness of the red onion really lifts up the hearts of palm. Eat it on it’s own or on a salad, but I think it’s best served on crispy tostadas with creamy avocado slices and a nice cold beer.

Spicy Hearts of Palm Ceviche

I know most of you are already in full swing of pumpkin season, but I’m kind of still stuck in summer, since the heat doesn’t seem to want to die down here. What better to cool down the than a spicy hearts of palm aguachile or ceviche??

 

Spicy Hearts of Palm Ceviche

Halloween is right around the corner and it look like it’s going to be Star Wars crazy. Up until a couple of weeks ago I had never watched a single one of the Star Wars movies. I can’t blame this one on growing up in Mexico, because I know there are a lot of Mexican Star Wars fans out there.

aguachile de palmito

Maybe it’s because I have three sisters, and no brothers. However, ask me anything about Disney movies and I can probably answer in a heart beat. Since the new Star Wars movie is coming out in December my husband has been introducing me to the series. I’ve mostly enjoyed it, but I do have to say I find C-3PO very annoying. A lot of things make sense now though, like Indiana Jones and a thousand other cultural references. I can’t believe it took me so long to watch them.

Aguachile in a molcajete, how to make aguachile vegan

The Recipe: How to make Aguachile vegan??

  • You might have to try several brands of hearts of palm and see which one you like best. Some are more tender than others.
  • The recipe calls for 1 serrano pepper, but if you don’t eat a lot of spicy food I would only use 1/2 or even a 1/3 of a pepper.
  • Enjoy!

 

Aguachile in a molcajete, how to make aguachile vegan

Hearts of Palm Aguachile (How to make aguachile vegan?)

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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 can (14.1 oz) Hearts of Palm, sliced
  • 2 cups Sliced cucumber, peeled and without seeds
  • ½ Red onion, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup Cilantro, chopped
  • ½ - 1 Serrano pepper
  • 2 tbsp. Lime juice, fresh

Instructions

  • Drain the water from the hearts of palm can. Slice them in half lengthwise and slice them ¼ inch thick.
  • Peel the cucumber, cut lengthwise, and use a spoon to scoop out the seeds. Do not discard the seeds and flesh.
  • In a large bowl combine the hearts of palm, 1 cup of the sliced cucumber, and the sliced red onion.
  • In the blender, combine the serrano pepper, lime juice, chopped cilantro, the additional 1 cup of sliced cucumber, the seeds and flesh that was scooped out of the cucumbers, and process until smooth.
  • Pour this liquid over the hearts of palm mixture, season with salt and pepper, and let sit in refrigeration for 10 min.
  • Adjust seasoning and serve on crispy tostadas with sliced of avocado.

Notes

You can add crumbled seaweed or seaweed powder to make this fishy. 

 

 

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

What can I say about vegan cheese? I don’t like it. I’m sorry, but I just don’t. Maybe it’s because I was a passionate cheese lover before going vegan. Oh did I love cheese! The stinkier the better. The vegan versions of cheese just don’t live up to my expectations, so I prefer to do without it. However, I decided to give it a try once more with this macadamia nut queso fresco, because you can’t drink a good glass of wine without cheese.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

The Recipe: Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

This cheese is perfect for a fruit and jam cheese plate, but also topped with a chipotle-pineapple salsa and some chips. The texture is light and easily spreadable. It has a touch of sweetness, but is savory in all the right ways.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

The best part of it is that it is so easy to make. First you soak the macadamia nuts in water overnight. The following day you grind them in the food processor with garlic, oil, salt, and a bit of lime juice. This makes a sort of paste with the consistency of ricotta cheese. You wrap this paste in cheese cloth, squeeze out the excess liquid and leave in the fridge overnight. That’s it, your cheese is ready to eat.

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

 

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

macadamia-nut-queso-fresco5

Macadamia Nut Queso Fresco

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Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 25 minutes
Servings: 3 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

Queso Fresco

  • 1 cup Macadamia nuts, raw
  • 1 clove Garlic, peeled
  • 1 tsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • 1 tbsp. Olive or vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp. Water
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 piece cheesecloth

Chipotle Pineapple Salsa

  • 1 Tomato, large
  • 1/4 Onion, white
  • 1 clove Garlic, unpeeled
  • ¼ cup Chopped pineapple
  • 1 Chile chipotle adobo (1 pepper)
  • 1 tbsp. Cilantro, chopped

Instructions

  • For the queso fresco: soak the macadamias in water at room temperature overnight. The following day, drain the nuts and place in a food processor with the garlic, lime juice, oil, water, and salt.
  • Process 1-2 minutes or until the nuts turn into a paste that resembles ricotta cheese. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  • Wet a large piece of cheesecloth, approximately 12” X 12”. Place the paste in the center and a form it into a ball by gathering the edges of the cheesecloth around the cheese.
  • Twist the top edges of the cheesecloth to tighten, give shape, and get rid of excess water in the cheese. Place the cheese bundle on a plate and let sit overnight in the refrigerator.
  • The next day unwrap your cheese and serve.
  • To make the salsa: boil water in a small saucepot. Drop tomato in and lower heat to a simmer. Simmer for 3-4 minutes or until the tomato begins to soften.
  • While the tomato is simmering, set a large sauté pan to medium-high heat. Place the onion and garlic in the pan and let the high heat char them for 2 minutes on each side. Remove from pan, peel the garlic, and place them both in the blender.
  • Remove the tomato from the water and add to the blender. Add the chipotle, cilantro, and pineapple to the blender and process until you reach the desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Notes

If you cannot easily find raw macadamia nuts, you can substitute with blanched almonds.

 

 

This past week was rough. School started on Monday and it couldn’t come soon enough, except I now have to wake up at 6:15 am in order to make it out the door with two dressed and fed children. I am not a morning person, not at all, so I was barely functioning all week. I did however enjoy the quiet that came with the baby’s uninterrupted nap and some much needed morning alone time. By the end of the week I knew things were bad when I sent my hubby to pick up Dylan, and it turns out he didn’t get out until two hours later and I forgot to pack his lunch!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

It seems like no matter what I do I’m always one step behind. It kind of feels like all I have to do is give one more push and the race will be over, but the race never ends. Just the other day I was looking for school lunch ideas on pinterest for a newsletter I do for my local moms group, when I got a case of the mommy-chef guilt. I usually pack him pb & j, veggies and fruit, and some goldfish. It’s practically the same everyday, nothing cute or artsy about it, and honestly it’s all I can muster that early in the morning. Sometimes I think, ” All that money that went in to culinary school and all I can make is pb & J?” So I asked Dylan (6yrs old) if he would help me plan his school lunches. I told him one day we could have veggie sushi, maybe another day hummus cucumber pinwheels, and another day noodles. He just kind of stared at me with a blank face. So I said, ” Or, we can just have peanut butter and jelly every day.” The boy responded with an enthusiastic yes, so pb & j it is. I proudly declare we will not be making any fancy school lunches this year!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

The Recipe: Mexican Pickled Jalapeños and Radishes

This month is what we call in Mexico, el mes de la patria (patriotic month). It’s the actual month of Mexico’s independence. I still don’t know how we will be celebrating, but I finally perfected the Mexican pickled jalapeños recipe (jalapeños en escabeche). I was having trouble getting them to taste just like the canned ones. My favorite brand is La Costeña. I had used a combination of cider and white vinegar, and the problem was solved when I completely eliminated the cider vinegar. I water canned them, but you can make refrigerator ones, and skip the canning process. I chose to use radishes in this case, because we kept getting them in the CSA basket every week. The result was jar after jar of slightly pink hued jalapeñ0s. The jalapeños, radishes, onion, and carrots are infused with the flavors of fresh oregano and thyme. They are tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. Enjoy!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

Mexican Pickled Jalapeños & Radishes

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Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 4 pints
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Red radishes, sliced ¼ inch thick
  • 1 lb. Carrots, peeled, sliced ¼ inch thick
  • ½ lb Jalapeños
  • 1 Onion, white large, sliced thinly
  • 4 sprigs Oregano, fresh
  • 3 sprigs Thyme, fresh
  • 1 Bay leaf
  • ¼ cup Olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. Salt, kosher
  • 5 cups White vinegar
  • ½ cup Water

Instructions

  • Heat ¼ cup of olive oil in a large pot to medium heat. Once the oil is hot add the onions and cook for 1 minute.
  • Add the carrots, jalapeños, and radishes and let cook for 1- 2 minutes. Add the vinegar to the hot pot with the vegetables. (Be careful. When the vinegar touches the oil there will be some splashing.)
  • Add the water, thyme, oregano, bay leaf, and salt. Let simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender, but not completely soft.
  • While the vegetables are cooking, sterilize your jars by boiling them in water for 5 min. When your vegetables are ready, use canning tongs to remove the jars from the water, pouring the water in the jars back in the canner.
  • Bring the water in your canning pot back to a boil. Pour the vegetables into the jars using a ladle and a canning funnel, but be sure to leave ½ inch of headspace at the top.
  • Use a chopstick to release air bubbles by running it around the inside of the jar. Clean the rims of the jars with a moist paper towel. Put on the lids and screw the rings on until finger tight. Do not force it.
  • Transfer the jars to the pot, making sure they are vertical and that there is at least one inch of water covering them. Bring water to a boil and process cans for 10 minutes.
  • Remove jars from water and place on top of a wire rack. Let cool. You should hear a pop when the lids seal completely. Leave undisturbed for 6 hrs. If the lids are not sealed properly you will have to process them again.
  • Remove the rings and store jars in a cool, dark place. Refrigerate after opening.

Notes

Recipe yields 4 pint jars.

 

Summer is quickly coming to an end, or has come to an end for some of you. The heat is escalating quickly and hot summer days will soon be hot school days, where we spend our days lugging our kids from one place to another and rushing home to do homework. I’m not looking forward to the rushing around, but I am looking forward to quiet mornings and maybe more time to blog.

vegan chorizo torta

My favorite part of the summer was definitely the visit from my nieces and all the fun things we did. The worst part of the summer was Dylan breaking his arm doing Jiu Jitsu, which put an end to all of our water filled summer activities. What was the best part of your summer?

broken arm

Before I forget, I have to tell you about a new recipe site called Yummly. You can search for recipes by season, ingredient, tastes, techniques, cuisine, courses, sources, and brands.  You can also add recipes from around the web to your recipe box. Yummly is also working with other bloggers to include as many recipes from around the web as possible. You should definitely go check it out.

vegan chorizo torta

The Recipe: Vegan Chorizo Torta

This vegan chorizo torta is going to knock your socks off! I was already in love with the chorizo recipe, but this torta is something else. What is a torta anyway? It is basically the Mexican version of a sandwich. A bolillo, french- style roll, is spread with refried beans and creamy avocado, and filled with a spicy chorizo center, tomato, and a couple of slices of onion. The whole thing is then toasted on a griddle, kind of like a panini. Serve with pickled jalapeños for an extra kick. Enjoy!

vegan chorizo torta

vegan chorizo torta

Vegan Chorizo Torta

5 from 1 vote
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Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 4 Bolillos or French rolls
  • 1 can (15.5 oz.) Black beans
  • 2 Avocadoes
  • 1 Onion, white, sliced thinly
  • 2 Tomatoes, large, sliced
  • ½ - 1 lb. Homemade vegan chorizo (see note)

Instructions

  • Heat a large sauté pan to medium heat. Add 1 tbsp. of oil or water (if you are oil-free). Add chorizo and cook for 5-6 minutes or until it begins to slightly brown. Remove from heat and set aside.
  • Cut the avocadoes in half, remove the pits, and scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a bowl. Mash with a fork and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  • Drain the black beans, but reserve 2-3 tbsp. of the liquid. Mash the beans with a fork or a potato masher until they reach the consistency of refried beans. (You can, of course, use real refried beans instead.) I like to add 2 tbsp. of salsa instead of the canned bean liquid.
  • Slice the rolls in half, lengthwise and scoop out some of the soft interior. Spread 2 tbsp. or more of the avocado on the top half of the bread, and top with 2 slices of onion.
  • Spread 2 tbsp. or more of the beans on the bottom half of the bread. Divide the chorizo mixture between the bottom half of the 4 rolls. Top with 2-3 slices of tomato, and cover with top half of bread.
  • Heat a griddle or cast iron pan over medium heat. Once hot, place the tortas on it and cook for about 5 min, on each side. You can place a heavy sauté pan on top of the tortas while they are cooking to give it a panini effect, or just use a panini press.
  • Serve with pickled jalapeños.

Notes

You can find the recipe for Homemade Vegan Chorizo here or you can buy your own.

 

It’s finally done!!! My Vegan Mexican Table, your FREE ecookbook with 10 brand new recipes. I have been working on this for months now, and after many late nights and maybe a little too much TV for the kiddos, I am more than happy with the results.

I started this blog to share the benefits of a vegan lifestyle with the Mexican community. I have taken traditional Mexican recipes and made them vegan, in the hopes that many people in the community can regain their health. Sometimes when you first become vegan, you think you will have to give up all of your favorite comfort foods, but I think this proves that it is not so. You can live a cruelty-free, plant-based life and eat the foods you love!

Get My Vegan Mexican Table for FREE

To download it, simply join our email list and you will receive a link to download it.  If you are already part of, or are already subscribed you will be receiving an email shortly with the link.

The 10 recipes in the book are as follows:

My Vegan Mexican Table a Free eCookbook. It contains 10 brand new recipes: peanut enchiladas, tamarind popsicles, tortilla soup. mole de olla

 

My Vegan Mexican Table a Free eCookbook. It contains 10 brand new recipes: peanut enchiladas, tamarind popsicles, tortilla soup. mole de olla

My favorite recipe is definitely the oatmeal cookies. They are sweetened with piloncillo and spiced with cinnamon and clove. They are packed with sweet golden raisins and pecans. Another one that you should definitely try are the peanut enchiladas with braised greens. The sauce is spicy, creamy, and luscious! Oh and you can’t forget the tortilla soup! I hope you enjoy the enjoy and love the recipes as much as we do.

My Vegan Mexican Table a Free eCookbook. It contains 10 brand new recipes: peanut enchiladas, tamarind popsicles, tortilla soup. mole de olla My Vegan Mexican Table a Free eCookbook. It contains 10 brand new recipes: peanut enchiladas, tamarind popsicles, tortilla soup. mole de olla

Hot sticky summers, clothes drenched in sweat, and the almost unbearable burn of the sun on your skin can only describe a summer in northern Mexico, ok and probably Arizona and Texas too. Those were the summers of my childhood, but summer in Mexico also means dozens of paleta flavors to explore and the perfect yuki o raspado(slushie) to cool you down. One of the most memorable raspados is the mangonada, a combination of sweet mango puree and ice, layered with spicy chamoy, lime juice and chile powder. It is a classic combination of sweet, sour, and spicy, which is a popular flavor profile of Mexican cuisine, and one of my favorites.

mangonada

This mangonada was made with homemade chamoy which means it has no added sugar! What no sugar? That’s right. (Chamoy is a sweet and spicy sauce made from dried apricots that is used as a dip for fruit or in paletas and raspados.) The only sugar in this mangonada is the natural sugar found in the mango and dried apricots. You can also buy chamoy bottled at your local hispanic market or on amazon. Just writing about this is making my mouth water.

mangonada

mangonada

We will not be spending this summer in Mexico. Instead two of my nieces are coming to visit. We will be enjoying the beautiful California weather and beaches  while they are here. There will be swim lessons, vacation bible school and possibly a road trip in July. I’m looking forward to a long summer spent with family and friends. Enjoy!

The Recipe: Mangonada (Mango and Chamoy Slushie)

mangonada

Mangonada (Mango and Chamoy Slushie)

5 from 2 votes
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Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

Chamoy

  • 1 cup Apricots, dried
  • 2 cups Water
  • 2-3 tbsp. Chile ancho powder
  • 2 tbsp. Lime juice, fresh
  • 1 tbsp. Apple cider vinegar

Slushie

  • 1 cup + 2 tbsp. Mango, diced
  • 1 cup Ice
  • 6 tbsp. Chamoy
  • 1 Lime, juice of
  • Chile powder To Taste (tajín)

Instructions

  • To make the chamoy, place the dried apricots and water in a saucepot and bring it up to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 30 min. Set aside.
  • Reserve ¾ of a cup of the apricot cooking liquid.
  • Take the simmered apricots, reserved cooking liquid, chile ancho powder, lime juice, and apple cider vinegar and blend until smooth. Add more or less water for a thinner or thicker consistency. (I left mine a little on the thick side.) Let cool.
  • To make the slushie, place ½ cup of mango in the bottom of the blender container, add a layer of ice, continue to alternate the layers this way with the rest of your ice and 1 cup mango.
  • Blend on medium speed until you are left with a slushie consistency. The pieces of ice, though small, should still be seen.
  • To assemble, take to glasses and pour in a tbsp. of chamoy in the bottom of each one. Add a layer of mango slushie, followed by another tbsp. of chamoy. Repeat one more time.
  • Sprinkle 1 tbsp. of diced mango on the top of each finished slushie. Squeeze half of a lime into each glass and top with as much chile powder as you desire. Serve with a spoon and a straw.

Notes

Makes 2 (8 oz.) glasses. Use 2 tbsp. of ancho chile powder for a mild chamoy, use 3 for a spicier version.

 

 

Have you ever found that you are making dinner and you realize you don’t have salsa? In a Mexican household this could almost be considered a sin. It doesn’t matter what’s for dinner, you need salsa! This is where this salsa comes in. It takes 5 minutes to make, no really, 5 minutes. It’s so simple I don’t know why I hadn’t thought about it myself. The recipe for 5-minute salsa is from my new brother-in-law, Polo. His grandmother used to make this when there was a salsa emergency and she also used it to flavor her arroz a la mexicana. This salsa is fresh, tangy, spicy and   just a bit sweet. It is a great way to use up your summer tomatoes.

This 5-minute salsa is fresh, tangy, spicy and just a bit sweet. It's a great way to use up your summer tomatoes. It only takes 5 minutes.

Polo married my little sister Gaby, the baby of the family. They have been married for 7 months now, but let me tell you, they really do love each other. It’s so nice to see a newlywed couple going through their first hardships, and adjusting to life with each other. You can just feel the love, you know, not like us “old” married couples that have kids in diapers who are in survival mode and have been sleep deprived for about 6 years now. At first I kind of felt jealous I guess, like Polo was taking my sister away from me, but I suspect Polo will soon conquer our hearts just like he conquered hers.

When you welcome someone new into the family, you begin to share and integrate your beliefs and traditions. That’s why I’m very happy to introduce you to Polo in the most perfect way, a recipe. Hopefully as we get to know him, he will share more of his family recipes with us.

This 5-minute salsa is fresh, tangy, spicy and just a bit sweet. It's a great way to use up your summer tomatoes. It only takes 5 minutes.

I also want to take this opportunity to promote Polo and Gaby’s dental practice, Nu-Life Dental Clinic in Monterrey, Mexico. If you live near the border with Texas I recommend you check them out. They have affordable prices and great service. Gaby is an orthodontist and Polo is a DDS (doctor in dental surgery) with a specialty in endodontics. The practice offers orthodontic, endodontic, periodontal, and restorative services. (I just had to look all those up, so don’t feel bad if you have no idea what I’m talking about.) They’re good at their jobs, and they will take care of you. If you live in Monterrey you definitely have to go see them. Here they are, aren’t they cute.

This 5-minute salsa is fresh, tangy, spicy and just a bit sweet. It's a great way to use up your summer tomatoes. It only takes 5 minutes.

That ebook I’ve been working on is almost done, so be sure to subscribe a the top right so you can be the first to get it. Also don’t forget to follow me on pinterest. I have tons of vegan recipes on there. Enjoy!

The Recipe: 5-minute salsa

You can add some garlic, onion, and cilantro for extra flavor.

five-minute-salsa

5-Minute Salsa

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Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Servings: 1 cup
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 3 Tomatoes, roma
  • 1 Serrano peppers

Instructions

  • Grate the tomatoes, using the large holes on your grater, into a bowl.
  • Grate the serranos into the same bowl using the small holes in the grater. Mix well.
  • Season with salt and pepper.

Notes

To increase spiciness, add more serranos. You can also grate some garlic in there, add cilantro, or get creative and add as many ingredients as you like.