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Easy Vegan Blueberry Muffins (Fuss-Free Vegan)

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There’s nothing quite as effortless as popping a muffin in your purse for breakfast when you’re on the go, and these easy vegan blueberry muffins are the perfect solution. The recipe is from Sam Turnbull’s new book Fuss-Free Vegan: 101 Everyday Comfort Food Favorites, Veganized. Sam is the girl behind the blog It Doesn’t Taste Like Chicken.

Fuss-free vegan cookbook

This is the perfect book for the new vegan. I wish it had been around when I started to make changes, but still craved my favorite comfort foods. In the beginning I was so hesitant to try to veganize things like pizza and burgers, because I knew it wouldn’t taste the same. It took me a long time to finally try it. I wish Sam’s book was around back then.

There's nothing quite as effortless as popping a muffin in your purse for breakfast when you're on the go, and these easy vegan blueberry muffins are the perfect solution. They are so good!

The recipes, as the title suggests, are fuss-free. In other words, they are easy and require few ingredients. Some of my favorite recipes from the book, besides these vegan blueberry muffins, are the vegan mozzarella, the mushroom wellington, and the lasagna. Every recipe has a picture, which is very helpful, and it has a very thorough introduction to what you need in a vegan pantry and everyday kitchen tools. I would have liked to see more vegan Mexican recipes, but I guess that’s more my thing.

There's nothing quite as effortless as popping a muffin in your purse for breakfast when you're on the go, and these easy vegan blueberry muffins are the perfect solution. They are so good!

What I really loved about the book was that it is unmistakably Sam’s. It’s bright and colorful, like I imagine she is, and you can tell she put a lot of hard work into it. She even made her own font!! I really recommend this book, especially if you’re just starting out. You won’t be disappointed.

The Recipe: Easy Vegan Blueberry Muffins

The recipe is pretty straightforward, but I did successfully make these substituting:

  • the sugar with 1/2 cup of maple syrup (for those that are sugar free),
  • the oil for apple sauce (for those that are fat-free)
  • I did 1/2 AP flour and 1/2 whole wheat flour
  • You can substitute the blueberries for raspberries or blackberries if you wish.

Enjoy!

There's nothing quite as effortless as popping a muffin in your purse for breakfast when you're on the go, and these easy vegan blueberry muffins are the perfect solution. They are so good!

There's nothing quite as effortless as popping a muffin in your purse for breakfast when you're on the go, and these easy vegan blueberry muffins are the perfect solution. They are so good!
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Easy Vegan Blueberry Muffins

"Excerpted from Fuss Free Vegan: 101 Everyday Comfort Food Favorites, Veganized. Copyright © 2017 Samantha Turnbull. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.”
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 12 small muffins
200 kcal
Author Sam Turnbull

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups All-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup White sugar
  • 2 tsp. Baking powder
  • ½ tsp. Salt

Wet Ingredients

  • ¾ cup Non-dairy milk (such as soy or almond)
  • ½ cup light oil (such as canola or vegetable oil)
  • 1 tbsp. Fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)

Preparation

  1. Preheat your oven to 400°F. Lightly grease the cups of a muffin pan or fill it with liners.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients. Set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together all of the wet ingredients except for the blueberries. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Add the blueberries and lightly fold them in, being careful not to overmix. It’s ok if there are lumps.
  4. For large bakery-style muffins, fill 8–9 muffin cups right to the top with batter, then bake for 18–22 minutes until lightly golden on top, and a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes
  5. out clean. For small muffins, divide the batter evenly among the 12 muffin cups and bake for 15–20 minutes, until lightly golden on top and a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Let the muffins cool in the pan, then store them on a plate covered with a clean tea towel for 2 to 3 days. This will keep the muffins the best texture, but if you want them to last longer, store them in a large sealable bag in the fridge for up to a week.
Nutrition Facts
Easy Vegan Blueberry Muffins
Amount Per Serving (1 muffin)
Calories 200 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 9g 14%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 101mg 4%
Potassium 109mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates 26g 9%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 13g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin A 0.1%
Vitamin C 2%
Calcium 5.7%
Iron 4.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

DisclosureI received a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

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Kitchen Creativity- My Review

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

I have been a huge fan of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg since culinary school. A lot of the chefs at school would recommend that you read Becoming a Chef, and once they realized you were serious about making this your career they recommended Culinary Artistry. Once I started my career, every single chef I worked for had Culinary artistry in their library. Later I fell in love with the Flavor bible so I was so excited when the opportunity presented itself to review their new book Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius—with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the World’s Most Creative Chefs.

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

Kitchen Creativity has managed to put into words the creative process and strategies that chefs use when taking a raw material and turning it into a creation that inspires, innovates, and transmits ideas, feelings, and memories. It contains the voices of over 1oo chefs sharing tidbits of their creative process from farm to plate, including vegan chefs Tal Ronnen and Isa Chandra Moskowitz. It is not a recipe book, instead this book wants to inspire you to access your own style and creativity, and to use it as a way to express who you are and share it with others through food.

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

Easier said than done, if you ask me! So how do you become a creative cook? You do so in three stages: mastery, alchemy, and creativity. Mastery is the stage to develop a skill base or knowledge, and to imitate the masters. Alchemy is when you take new experience and knowledge and apply it to the classics. The final step, creativity, is all about connecting the old and new ideas, and combining them into something completely new.

Without a doubt, my favorite part of the book is part II: A World of Infinite Culinary Possibilities a.k.a The Lists (A-Z). In this section you will find comprehensive list of ideas for inspiration including flavor combinations by season, recent innovations in the culinary world, and best practices or techniques. Below you will find an excerpt of this section titled: Treating Plants Like Meat

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

TREATING PLANTS LIKE MEAT

Brining

Bourguignon, e.g., beet, celery root

Burgers, e.g., portobellos, veggie

Carpaccio, e.g., beet, carrot, eggplant, king oyster mushroom, persimmon, root vegetables, winter squash, zucchini

Charring

Cheesesteaks, e.g., seitan (à la Philadelphia’s Blackbird Pizza’s version made with rosemary and garlic seared seitan, grilled onions and green peppers, and vegan whiz, served on an artisan hoagie roll)

Confit, e.g., bell pepper, carrots, garlic, mushrooms, onions, shallots, squash, tomatoes

Fondue, e.g., rutabaga (à la Rich Landau’s version at Philadelphia’s Vedge)

Dry-rubbing

Grilling

Marinating

Meatballs, e.g., legumes, mushrooms

Porterhouse, e.g., cabbage (à la Marc Forgione’s version at NYC’s American Cut)

Roasting, e.g., beets (à la John Fraser’s version at NYC’s Narcissa)

Searing

Shawarma, e.g., seitan (marinated in black pepper + chili powder + coriander + cumin + garlic + marjoram + olive oil + onion + oregano + rosemary + thyme) or trumpet mushroom (à la Rich Landau’s version at Philadelphia’s V Street)

Smoking, e.g., cabbage, carrots (think lox), cheese (e.g., Gouda, mozzarella), corn, eggplant, nuts, olives, potatoes, tempeh, tofu, tomatoes

Steaks, e.g., beet, cabbage, cauliflower, winter squash

Stewing

Tartare, e.g., beet, carrot

Torchon, e.g., mushroom (à la Eric Ziebold’s version at DC’s Kinship)

Wellington, e.g., carrot (à la John Fraser’s version at New York City’s Narcissa)

Wood-roasting, e.g., asparagus

Imagine: Chef Todd Gray of Equinox in Washington, D.C., started the Vegan Smackdown Challenge to create vegan versions of recipes from prominent chefs such as Jose Andres, Todd English, and Carla Hall. How would you go about creating a meatless, eggless, and dairy-free version of a classic dish?

Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius—with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the World’s Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017).

I highly recommend this book for all serious cooks, chefs, and food bloggers. If there is a chef in your life they need this! If you are a food blogger this book will let you in on what goes on in the mind of a chef, which will help immensely with recipe creation; but most importantly, it will motivate you to make your best ideas a reality.

DisclosureI received a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

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Vegan Day of the Dead Bread

Who knew death could be so colorful? Purple and orange tissue paper banners line altars decorated with marigold petals, colorful sugar skulls, and a bounty of fruit and vegetables. This is a celebration of life and triumph over death, the intermingling of the religious beliefs of the indigenous people of Mexico and the faith of the Spaniards that conquered them. The Day of the Dead is not only a holiday that honors those who have left us, but it is believed that on that special day the souls of the dead return to visit the living. Both the indigenous people and the Church of the Spaniards believed that death was not an end, but only a passageway to another life. That is why this is a joyous occasion, a homecoming festival, and at the same time a way to mock death and the power it holds over our bodies.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores, the Aztecs held rituals for the dead during the summer months in a joint celebration with the first days of harvest. The dead were traditionally buried with rich offering of ceramics, personal objects, and food. The offerings where meant to assist them in their journey to the afterlife. After the arrival of the Catholic missionaries their traditions and beliefs were merged with those of the indigenous people, and the festivities were moved to coincide with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, Nov 1st and Nov 2nd.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

 

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

The festivities have evolved over the years and differ from region to region. Some of the most popular ones include altars in honor of loved ones who have passed, preparing the dead’s favorite foods, and gathering at the cemetery to decorate a loved one’s grave, share a meal and reminiscence. My favorite tradition is the elaboration of the altars. The symbolism incorporated into the altars is so rich and meaningful that it truly honors the dead, those we keep in our hearts, but somehow with the passing of time fade in our memories.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Every altar has several key symbols which are:

water– as an offering to the soul to quench their thirst in their long journey

salt– as a symbol of purification and to preserve the body so it will not wither

fire– to represent the light of the faith and guide the spirits in their journey

incense– to elevate our prayers to God in heaven

flowers– marigolds, their color represents the radiance of sunlight and life

bread– as a symbol of the body of Christ, usually round loaves with topped with “bones” and known as pan de muerto

a picture of the person who the altar is dedicated to

religious images– to symbolize God as an intermediary between the living and the dead

the favorite foods and drinks of the departed– to delight the souls who will be visiting (the most common being Mexican hot chocolate, tequila, atole, mole, tortillas and rice

candy skulls– the indigenous held the skull as symbol of death being a part of life

tissue paper banners– purple to symbolize christian mourning and orange to symbolize Aztec mourning

fruits and vegetables– an offering from the earth

personal objects of the person being honored– to accompany them on their journey back

a dog– to protect and guide the spirits.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Every year we make an altar in our home to a loved one lost. It is our own special way of introducing our deceased loved ones to our children. We talk about the things that they liked to eat, do, and why they are important to us. On November 2nd we say a prayer for them, and keep hoping for the day we will be reunited in the afterlife. For years now, we have also been attending the Day of the Dead Festival in Oceanside, CA. The festival takes place in the Mission San Luis Rey. There are a variety of traditional foods such as tamales, tacos, tortas, aguas frescas, and pan de muerto. There is also face painting, sugar skull decorating, and regional dances. However, the highlight of the festival is the showcase of the altars, some representing various Mexican states and built by whole communities and families.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

Out of all the wonderful Mexican traditions, the Day of the Dead might be the one that still holds firm to its pre-Hispanic roots. The loved ones lost, who we cannot see or hear, make themselves present in our homes, share our food, and partake in the rejoicing of life and the conquest of death.

Sources:

Los Dias de Los Muertos, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian and National Museum of American History, 2010

Simbolismos en el altar del Dia de los Muertos, Tanatologa Aida Maria Castro Morales, 2007 (http://www.slideshare.net/internatoni/simbolismos-en-el-altar-del-da-de-muertos)

The Recipe: Vegan Day of the Dead Bread (Pan de Muerto)

This recipe might be better than the non-vegan version, according to my husband. I have substituted the eggs with potatoes, resulting in a moist, soft, and sweet bread. It is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate or coffee.

pan-de-muerto2

Bake at 350F for 40- 45 minutes. Brush with butter and sprinkle with sugar.

pan de muerto

 

pan de muerto
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Vegan Day of the Dead Bread

Prep Time 1 day
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 1 day 45 minutes
Servings 4 loaves
Author Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 pack (.75 oz) Active dry yeast
  • ½ cup (3.5 oz) Almond milk, room temperature, 3.5 oz
  • 3 1/3 cup (17.5 oz) Bread flour
  • ¾ cup (5.5 oz) Sugar, granulated
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Orange zest
  • ¼ cup Orange juice
  • ¾ cup (6 oz.) Potato, Yukon gold, cooked, mashed
  • ½ cup + 1 tbsp. (4 ¼ oz.) Vegan butter room temperature, cut into 1 inch pieces,

Topping

  • 2 tbsp. Vegan butter, melted
  • ½ cup Sugar, granulated

Preparation

  1. In a medium bowl, dissolve the yeast in the almond milk and add 2 tbsp. of the flour. Whisk to incorporate and let rest in a warm place for 20 min.
    pan-de-muerto2
  2. In the bowl of a mixer, with the dough hook, combine the dry ingredients: the rest of the flour, salt, sugar, and orange zest. Mix.
    pan-de-muerto2
  3. Add the wet ingredients: the orange juice, mashed potato, and yeast-flour mixture. Mix on low until the dough begins to incorporate.
    pan-de-muerto2
  4. Add the ½ cup + 1 tbsp. of softened butter little by little and increase speed to medium. Mix for 15 min. until the dough has come off the sides of the bowl and is stretchy but not sticky.
    pan-de-muerto2
  5. Place the dough in a large oiled bowl, cover with a towel and let rise for 1 to 1 ½ hours, or until doubled in size. Punch down the dough and fold the side over unto each other and flip. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
    pan-de-muerto2
  6. The next day take the dough from the fridge, remove the plastic wrap and cover with a towel. Let rise in a warm place (70-75F) until the dough comes to room temperature, about an hour.
    pan-de-muerto2
  7. Take a piece of dough, weighing about 3 oz., and set aside. Divide the remaining dough into four pieces. Roll them tightly into rounds and place on a sheet tray lined with parchment. Press down on the rounds lightly.
  8. Use the reserved dough to make 4 small balls the size of a quarter and set aside. Use the remaining dough to roll out eight strips long enough to cover the rounds. Place two strips on top of each round forming an x, use your fingers to press lightly on the strips to form knobs, they should resemble bones. Repeat the process with the rest of the rounds.
  9. Cover with a towel and let rise for 1 ½ hrs. in a warm place (70- 75F) or until double in size.
    pan-de-muerto2
  10. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 350F. Place the small balls in the center of the rounds with a little bit of water. Bake for 20-30 min. until the rounds have become a rich brown color. Cover with foil and bake for 10 to 15 min. more, until the bread reaches an internal temperature of 190F. Remove from the oven and let cool on a rack.
  11. While the bread is still warm melt 2 tbsp. of butter and brush the bread with it. Sprinkle evenly with sugar.
  12. Let bread completely cool before eating.

Chef's Notes

My favorite vegan butter is Earth Balance. This recipe is a combination of my dad’s recipe and Fanny Gerson’s method for Pan de Muerto in My Sweet Mexico.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.

This vegan Day of the Dead bread (Pan de Muerto) is moist, airy, has a hint of orange zest, and is perfect for dipping in hot chocolate.