This salsa molcajeteada combines pan roasted tomatoes, garlic, and peppers to make a spicy and hearty salsa. They are ground down in an authentic Mexican molcajete. It is a staple in all Mexican homes, super easy to make, even if you don’t have a molcajete, and it adds a perfect touch of spiciness to any meal.

Charred tomatoes, peppers, and onion in a sheet tray lined with foil.

This recipe is from our housekeeper Polita, or I should say my parents’ housekeeper. I wish I had a housekeeper!!! She has worked with us for over 20 yrs. She was my nanny, as well as the house cook, and seamstress. Over the years she has become more of a companion for my mother and a beloved part of our family.

Garlic in a molcajete for salsa molcajeteada

Garlic ground to a paste in the molcajete

Let me tell you she likes her salsa hot!! She makes it in my mom’s molcajete, which I desperately tried to get here to give to me, but she refused. I can have it when she’s dead, she said. Because of this I had to buy a molcajete from Sur la Table!! It’s actually harder than you would think to find a good quality molcajete in the US. It might be easier now from Amazon than a couple of years ago.

Peppers ground to a paste in the molcajete

Be careful of cheap molcajetes because they might be made with cement and not volcanic stone. There are ways to tell if your molcajete is made with cement or volcanic rock. Usually a molcajete made with cement will not release any grit or if it does it will be a fine powder. A real volcanic rock molcajete will release grit into your food until it is properly seasoned.

Two tomatoes on top of chile puree in the molcajete

Once you determine that your molcajete is real, you will have to season it, unless you bought it already seasoned. To season it you basically have to grind a mixture of rice and a little bit of water, over and over again until the paste comes out white. You can see step-by-step instructions here.

Salsa molcajeteada in a large molcajete surrounded by tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic

Now you’re all set! When I use the molcajete to make salsa I feel so connected to my roots and my people. I don’t know if it’s the repetitive motion that gets you thinking, but just to think that hundreds of years have passed, and I can still make salsa the way my great-great grandma did is something truly special.

Woman in kitchen roasting vegetables on pan

 

The Recipe: Salsa Molcajeteada

  • Warning!! This salsa is hot. If you would like a medium heat to your salsa omit the serrano peppers. If you can find them use chilaca peppers instead of anaheim.
  • To make this recipe even quicker you can place your peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and onion under your oven broiler set to HIGH until they are charred. Be sure to flip them halfway through so they char evenly.
  • If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.
  • Enjoy!!

Salsa molcajeteada in a large molcajete surrounded by tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic

Learn how to cure a molcajete here <——

Salsa Molcajeteada

This salsa molcajeteada combines pan roasted tomatoes, garlic, and peppers to make a spicy and hearty salsa. Made in an authentic molcajete.
4.67 from 3 votes
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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: authentic mexican salsa, molcajete salsa
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 2 cups
Calories: 100kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 3 Plum tomatoes, small
  • 1 Beefsteak tomato
  • 1/4 White onion
  • 3 cloves Garlic, unpeeled
  • 1 Poblano Pepper
  • 1 Anaheim pepper
  • 1 Jalapeño
  • 2 Serrano Peppers
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt (plus more as needed)
  • 1/4 cup Chopped cilantro

Instructions

  • Cut off the stems of the peppers and the tops of the tomatoes. 
  • Heat a griddle or cast iron pan to high heat. Place all of the peppers, tomatoes, onion, and garlic on the griddle until they become soft and slightly blackened, about 7-10 min. (See note)
  • Flip peppers, tomatoes, onion, and garlic and continue to char for another 5- 7 minutes. (The garlic will be done before the peppers and onions are finished cooking. Simply remove them from the griddle.)
  • Remove ingredients from griddle and set aside. Peel most of the dark burnt skin off of the tomatoes and chiles. You can leave a little bit for the smoky flavor. Peel the garlic. 
  • To start grinding ingredients in molcajete, place 1/2 tsp. of salt and the garlic in the molcajete. Grind down until a thick paste has been made. 
  • Add the onion and grind down to a paste. Add the peppers and grind down one by one until you have the desired consistency. Add the tomatoes one by one and keep grinding. Chop cilantro and add it to the molcajete. Season to taste and serve. 
  • If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.

Notes

Warning!! This salsa is hot. If you would like a medium heat to your salsa omit the serrano peppers. If you can find them use chilaca peppers instead of anaheim. 
To make this recipe even quicker you can place your peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and onion under your oven broiler set to HIGH until they are charred. Be sure to flip them halfway through so they char evenly.
If you do not have a molcajete you can use a blender or food processor. Simply place all the cooked ingredients in the machine and pulse until the desired consistency is reached. I prefer it on the chunky side.

Nutrition

Calories: 100kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 116mg | Potassium: 1001mg | Fiber: 7g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 3440IU | Vitamin C: 114mg | Calcium: 50mg | Iron: 1mg

 

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That’s right, a delicious and smooth crema made without dairy! Most recipes call for cashews, but cashews are pretty expensive, so I stared using almonds instead and loved the result. In fact, I think almonds work better since they are not as sweet as cashews. This almond crema can be drizzled on your enchiladas, tacos, sopes, or pretty much any vegan Mexican dish.

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!

The best part of this crema is that it is very versatile. You can add chipotle to it and drizzle it on pasta, or you could add roasted poblano to it and make poblano cream enchiladas. You could even omit the garlic, and add a banana to make an almond banana yogurt.

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!

It is super easy to make and you don’t necessarily have to have a high powered blender. (I have a Vitamix , which was a wedding gift, that I love and use almost everyday.) If you do have a high powered  blender, you can be lazy like me and make this crema without peeling or soaking the almonds. If you don’t have a high powered blender you will have to soak the nuts the night before, peel them, then blend them.

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!

Mexican crema is much thiner than than sour cream, so if you’re looking for a sour cream recipe simply reduce the amount of liquid in this recipe. The possibilities are endless with this almond crema!

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!

The Recipe: Almond Crema

If you have a high powered blender:

  • Add nuts as is, just make sure to blend until the sauce is very smooth.

If you have a regular blender:

  • Soak raw almonds for at least 8 hrs.
  • Peel and blend.

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!

Almond Crema

Did you know you could make a Mexican style crema with almonds?? That's right, this delicious and smooth almond crema has no dairy!
5 from 2 votes
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Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 4 people (1 1/2 cups)
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

High Powered Blender Crema:

  • ½ cup Almonds raw
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • ¾ cup Water
  • ¼ cup Almond milk unsweetened ( or vegetable oil)
  • 1 tbsp. Lemon juice fresh

Regular Blender Crema:

  • ½ cup Almonds raw
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • ¼ - ½ cup Water
  • ¼ cup Almond milk unsweetened (or vegetable oil)
  • 1 tbsp. Lemon juice fresh

Instructions

High Powered Blender Crema:

  • Place the almonds, garlic, water,almond milk, and lemon juice in the blender and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper.

Regular Blender Crema:

  • Boil water in a small pot and pour over almonds. Let sit overnight at room temperature.
  • The following day peel the almonds. The skins should pop right off.
  • Place the almonds, garlic, almond milk, and lemon juice in the blender. Add ¼ cup of water and process until smooth.
  • If it is too thick, add the remaining ¼ cup of water.
  • Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Notes

If you don't mind using oil, use it in place of the almond milk for a smoother sauce.

 

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This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

If you are new to veganism I just want to let you know that I get it, I miss cheese too. I loved cheese, all kinds of cheese! This is why I detest processed vegan cheese, because it just doesn’t taste like the original. (I haven’t had the privilege of tasting Miyokos vegan cheese, they say it’s a game changer though.) There are exceptions to this, like this vegan cotija cheese which is made from almonds. It of course is not like the original, but let’s just say it evokes the sensation and taste of cotija cheese.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

Cotija is actually a small town in the mountains of the state of Michoacan. The cheese is said to have originated more than 400 years ago. It was made by the local people to keep milk from spoiling by turning it into aged cheese. The cheese is aged for about 3 months and is available in large rounds. I visited Cotija, many years ago, and I remember being blown away by the sight of the huge cheese rounds in the local shops and restaurants.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

You must be wondering why I’m talking about the actual cheese making. Well, this blog is all about making traditional Mexican food vegan, but also about preserving our Mexican food traditions and food culture as much as possible. So, it’s important to look into the history a little bit. Plus, I’m a total food nerd.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

The Recipe: Vegan Queso Cotija

I got the idea of using almonds for this cheese from Eddie Garza’s book Salud, Vegan Mexican and from this recipe from Veggies Don’t Bite. I’ve put my own spin on it.

  • Use slivered almonds, do not soak them.
  • You can also use lime juice instead of lemon juice.

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.

Vegan Queso Cotija

This vegan queso cotija is crumbly, salty, and tangy. There’s absolutely no dairy in it and it’s delicious. It is perfect for topping sopes, chilaquiles, enchiladas, gorditas, salads, and pastas.
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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija, vegan cheese
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 23 hours 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 day
Servings: 2 cups
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Slivered almonds
  • 2 tsp. Lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. Brine from a jar of manzanilla olives
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  • Place the almonds. Lemon juice, brine, and salt in a food processor.
  • Process until you get a crumbly mixture resembling cheese, about 4-5 minutes. Be careful not over process or you’ll end up with almond butter.
  • Place mixture in a cheese cloth or nut bag and twist tight to close and squeeze all of the excess liquid out.
  • Place in the refrigerator for 24 hrs.
  • Remove cheese from cloth and crumble.

Video

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Notes

You can also use lime juice. Recipe adapted from Veggies Don’t bite
If you eat nutritional yeast, add 1 tsp. to the recipe before processing.

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This creamy and spicy avocado sauce is a great for dipping flautas or for topping your everyday tacos. It is traditionally served with flautas or taquitos, but it would also make a great addition to some vegan enchiladas. You can also use it as a salad dressing, or as a perfect pairing to your chips and salsa. The best part is that is has absolutely no dairy and it’s delicious.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

I’m taking over this recipe post to make an announcement. I’m pregnant!!! I’m 16 weeks along with baby #3. This pregnancy took us completely by surprise, but we are more than happy to receive another wonderful little one into our lives. This time around the nausea knocked me completely off my feet. It was bad, really bad, but I’m so glad that part is over. Otherwise the pregnancy is progressing normally.

IMG_7367

We are a bit concerned about having another premature baby. My son was born at 34 weeks and my daughter at 33 weeks. They were both in the NICU for a little over two weeks without any serious complications. We are hoping this baby will make it past 34 weeks, so please keep us in your prayers.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

As far as being vegan and pregnant I had a really hard time with the nausea. All vegetables and legumes completely grossed me out, so I ate mostly almonds, fruit, and some tofu. Once it subsided I started adding back in vegetables, starting with the greens and squashes, and then with the cruciferous vegetables. I wasn’t able to start eating legumes until week 14. Oh how I missed my beans! I’m hoping to keep the rest of my pregnancy as vegan as possible. I will keep you posted.

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

The Recipe: Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos

This sauce is seriously easy to make and won’t take more than 5 minutes. When I make this for the kids I omit the pickled jalapeño, but if you like spicy you can add as much jalapeño as you like. For another variation, you can add 1 cooked tomatillo for a more salsa verde feel. Enjoy!

This creamy and spicy avocado sauce for tacos is a great for dipping flautas, as a salad dressing, and over your favorite vegan enchiladas.

Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos

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Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Servings: 1 cup
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 Avocados, large, seed removed, flesh scooped out
  • 1/2 cup Liquid from Mexican Pickled Jalapeños (see note)
  • 1 tbsp. Chopped cilantro
  • 1 Pickled jalapeño pepper (optional)

Instructions

  • Blend all the ingredients until smooth. 
  • Season to taste with salt and pepper. 

Notes

You can buy Mexican pickled jalapeños at almost any grocery store now. My favorite are La Costeña  or you can make your own.

 

This past week was rough. School started on Monday and it couldn’t come soon enough, except I now have to wake up at 6:15 am in order to make it out the door with two dressed and fed children. I am not a morning person, not at all, so I was barely functioning all week. I did however enjoy the quiet that came with the baby’s uninterrupted nap and some much needed morning alone time. By the end of the week I knew things were bad when I sent my hubby to pick up Dylan, and it turns out he didn’t get out until two hours later and I forgot to pack his lunch!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

It seems like no matter what I do I’m always one step behind. It kind of feels like all I have to do is give one more push and the race will be over, but the race never ends. Just the other day I was looking for school lunch ideas on pinterest for a newsletter I do for my local moms group, when I got a case of the mommy-chef guilt. I usually pack him pb & j, veggies and fruit, and some goldfish. It’s practically the same everyday, nothing cute or artsy about it, and honestly it’s all I can muster that early in the morning. Sometimes I think, ” All that money that went in to culinary school and all I can make is pb & J?” So I asked Dylan (6yrs old) if he would help me plan his school lunches. I told him one day we could have veggie sushi, maybe another day hummus cucumber pinwheels, and another day noodles. He just kind of stared at me with a blank face. So I said, ” Or, we can just have peanut butter and jelly every day.” The boy responded with an enthusiastic yes, so pb & j it is. I proudly declare we will not be making any fancy school lunches this year!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

The Recipe: Mexican Pickled Jalapeños and Radishes

This month is what we call in Mexico, el mes de la patria (patriotic month). It’s the actual month of Mexico’s independence. I still don’t know how we will be celebrating, but I finally perfected the Mexican pickled jalapeños recipe (jalapeños en escabeche). I was having trouble getting them to taste just like the canned ones. My favorite brand is La Costeña. I had used a combination of cider and white vinegar, and the problem was solved when I completely eliminated the cider vinegar. I water canned them, but you can make refrigerator ones, and skip the canning process. I chose to use radishes in this case, because we kept getting them in the CSA basket every week. The result was jar after jar of slightly pink hued jalapeñ0s. The jalapeños, radishes, onion, and carrots are infused with the flavors of fresh oregano and thyme. They are tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. Enjoy!

This recipe for Mexican pickled jalapeños and radishes is tangy, spicy, and just the right amount of crunchy. The radishes add a nice pink hue

Mexican Pickled Jalapeños & Radishes

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Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 4 pints
Author: Dora Stone

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Red radishes, sliced ¼ inch thick
  • 1 lb. Carrots, peeled, sliced ¼ inch thick
  • ½ lb Jalapeños
  • 1 Onion, white large, sliced thinly
  • 4 sprigs Oregano, fresh
  • 3 sprigs Thyme, fresh
  • 1 Bay leaf
  • ¼ cup Olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. Salt, kosher
  • 5 cups White vinegar
  • ½ cup Water

Instructions

  • Heat ¼ cup of olive oil in a large pot to medium heat. Once the oil is hot add the onions and cook for 1 minute.
  • Add the carrots, jalapeños, and radishes and let cook for 1- 2 minutes. Add the vinegar to the hot pot with the vegetables. (Be careful. When the vinegar touches the oil there will be some splashing.)
  • Add the water, thyme, oregano, bay leaf, and salt. Let simmer for 8- 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender, but not completely soft.
  • While the vegetables are cooking, sterilize your jars by boiling them in water for 5 min. When your vegetables are ready, use canning tongs to remove the jars from the water, pouring the water in the jars back in the canner.
  • Bring the water in your canning pot back to a boil. Pour the vegetables into the jars using a ladle and a canning funnel, but be sure to leave ½ inch of headspace at the top.
  • Use a chopstick to release air bubbles by running it around the inside of the jar. Clean the rims of the jars with a moist paper towel. Put on the lids and screw the rings on until finger tight. Do not force it.
  • Transfer the jars to the pot, making sure they are vertical and that there is at least one inch of water covering them. Bring water to a boil and process cans for 10 minutes.
  • Remove jars from water and place on top of a wire rack. Let cool. You should hear a pop when the lids seal completely. Leave undisturbed for 6 hrs. If the lids are not sealed properly you will have to process them again.
  • Remove the rings and store jars in a cool, dark place. Refrigerate after opening.

Notes

Recipe yields 4 pint jars.

 

conos de cajeta

         I’m beginning to think maybe I should call this a Mexican food blog.  This week is a recipe for Chile de Arbol Salsa. It’s my last couple of days in Mexico and I’m sad to leave, but sooo looking forward to Cali. Everytime I come home I try to eat a little bit of everything, like the tacos al pastor they sell on the corner in front of Merco (a grocery store), the yukis (shaved ice) in front of the car wash on Hidalgo street, the mangonadas (mango and chile popsicles) at the Paleteria Aguirre (ice cream shop), and the elote en vaso (steamed mexican corn served with a chile mix, crema, butter, lime juice, and cheese), they sell outside of the Narvaez Hospital. 

Mexican corn

Well, you get my point, I could go on and on. It’s not a coincidence that all the foods I just named are street foods, street food is king in Mexico. In fact, some of the best food in Mexico is street food.

Food truck assembling my corn deliciousness

Of course there are nice restaurants, cafe’s, and taquerias (taco shops), but there’s just something about simple, hot, just made, delicious food, that’s hard to resist. It’s the ultimate non-processed fast food.

Chicharrones

Once I leave Mexico, it seems that I spend the rest of the year, in my kitchen, trying to recreate every Mexican dish possible. This week’s recipe is a simple salsa and a couple of cocktails. 

Fruit cups sold on the street.

Chips and salsa in Mexico are not quite like chips and salsa in the U.S. Don’t get me wrong, I actually like both versions, but they’re just different. You can make your own authentic chips and salsa in less than 20 min. or as they’re called in Mexico: totopos con salsa.

Sweet potato candy

 

Man in crutches pushing and ice cream cart

 

Carnitas sold by the kilo

For the chips, buy a pack of corn tortillas, not the frozen ones please, and cut into quarters. Fry them in 350F oil until golden brown. Remove the chips from the oil and sprinkle them with salt.  If you are feeling super inspired try making the salsa in a molcajete or a volcanic mortar. You can learn how to use one here.

chile de arbol salsa on a wooden board with blue corn chips

The Recipe: Chile de Arbol Salsa

chile de arbol salsa

Chile de Arbol Salsa

5 from 1 vote
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Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 2 cups
Calories: 88kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 8 Tomatillo, husks removed
  • 3 Garlic, cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/2 oz (3/4 cup) Chile de Arbol
  • 1/2 Onion. white chopped
  • 2 tbsp. Cilantro, chopped

Instructions

  • Heat cast iron pan or griddle to high heat. Place tomatillos and garlic cloves in pan. Let the tomatillo’s skin burn and blacken on all sides. The garlic needs to be only lightly toasted on each side, about 1 -2 min.
  • Remove garlic from pan, peel, and set aside.
  • Once the tomatillos are soft and mostly black, remove them from pan and place in a medium bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit for 5 min.
  • Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a small sauce pan.
  • Remove the stem and seeds from the chiles. Place them in the pot of boiling water and simmer from 5 to 7 minutes or until chiles are soft.
  • Drain the chiles from the water.
  • Place the tomatillos in the blender with the garlic, onion, cilantro, and chile de arbol. Blend, season, and add water is necessary to thin out sauce.

Notes

As an alternative you can place the tomatillos under the broiler in your oven for 15 to 20 min. until blackened and soft all over.

Nutrition

Calories: 88kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 16mg | Potassium: 632mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 3030IU | Vitamin C: 26mg | Calcium: 34mg | Iron: 2mg

 

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.