Flan, silky creamy delicious vegan flan. This custard-like creation is one of the most recognized desserts in all of Latin America and my absolute favorite!!

four white ceramic remekins the inside bottom coated with caramel

Making this involved using an ingredient I had never used before. It’s become pretty common in the vegan community for making vegan flan, mousses, cheese, and gummies. The secret ingredient for this flan is a powder called agar agar.

Coconut milk and agar agar in a stainless steel saucepot
a spoon dipped into the thickened milk mixture showing it coating the back of the spoon

What is Agar agar??

It is a semi-transparent powder derived from red/purple algae. It is the equivalent of vegan gelatin. As you know (or may not know) gelatin is made by prolonged boiling of skin, bones, and cartilage of animals. So since we don’t want to use that this, is where agar agar comes in to play.

coconut milk liquid poured into the white ramekins

How to use Agar agar?

You can buy agar agar right here. Be sure to buy the powdered version not the flakes for this recipe. You can use it just as you would powdered gelatin; you must place it in a liquid and heat it up to dissolve it. However, you can’t use agar agar in the same quantities as you would gelatin. Agar agar’s gelling properties are stronger than gelatin’s.

vegan flan on a small white laced plate with a coffee and another flan in the background

Making Vegan Flan at Home

For this vegan flan recipe, I decided to go with a mixture of coconut milk and oat milk. Coconut milk provides the fat needed to make this creamy and rich. I added oat milk so it wouldn’t taste too much like coconut.

Vegan flan with a spoonfull taken out of it.

I used small ceramic ramekins (3.5 oz.), but you can use whatever container you have at hand since these are not going in the oven, like these aluminum ramekins. However, your container must be able to sustain heat since we will be pouring scorching hot caramel into them.

10 yr old boy wearing a blue shirt holding a plate with flan

I like my flan thick and creamy ( as many of you expressed on my Instagram DMs), but there is another version of flan that is almost like a French crème caramel, very jiggly and delicate. If you want to make that version of flan, simply reduce the amount of agar-agar to 1 tsp.

vegan flan covered in caramel in a small white laced plate

Vegan Flan

Flan, silky creamy delicious vegan flan. This custard-like creation is one of the most recognized desserts in all of Latin America and my absolute favorite!!
5 from 2 votes
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: caramel, coconut milk, oat milk, vegan custard
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
4 hours
Servings: 6 small flan
Calories: 292kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Caramel:

  • ¾ cup Granulated sugar

Flan base:

  • 1 can Full fat coconut milk
  • 1 cup Oat milk
  • 1 tsp. Chickpea flour
  • 1/3 cup Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla
  • 1 1/4 tsp Agar agar powder (see note)

Instructions

  • Get ramekins ready to go.
  • Pour sugar into a medium sauce pot and set to medium-low heat. Let the sugar dissolve, gently swirling the pot but not stirring, until mixture turns a deep golden color, 8 to 9 minutes.
  • Immediately remove pot from heat and pour caramel into ramekins. Gently lift and tilt ramekins to coat the inside with caramel. Set aside.
  • Combine coconut milk and agar agar in a medium sauce pot.
  • In the blender combine the oatmilk, sugar, chickpea flour, and vanilla. Process until smooth. Pour this mixture into the pot with the coconut milk.
  • Bring mixture to a simmer for 5 minutes, then remove from the heat. Let cool slightly, then pour into ramekins.
  • Place ramekins in the fridge for 4 hours to let the flan set.
  • To serve, place bottom of ramekin in a container with hot water for 1 -2 minutes, in order to release the flan.
  • Use a small knife or offset spatula to carefully loosen the edges of the flan. Turn flan over onto a plate, shake gently to release flan and remove ramekin.

Notes

  • If you don’t have access to agar-agar you can use 1/3 cup + 1 tbsp. of cornstarch instead. Dissolve the cornstarch in the oat milk, and then proceed to add it to the blender with the sugar, vanilla, and chickpea flour. Then add to the coconut milk mixture on the stove and simmer for 5 min. 
  • If you would like this flan to be yellow in color you can add a couple drops of yellow food coloring.
  • If you want to make a very jiggly and delicate version of this flan (like crème caramel) simply reduce the amount of agar-agar to 1 tsp.
 

Nutrition

Serving: 1flan | Calories: 292kcal | Carbohydrates: 42g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Sodium: 28mg | Potassium: 167mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 39g | Vitamin A: 82IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 69mg | Iron: 2mg

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These TVP tacos will completely change your mind about using alternative proteins!! The filling is a mixture of textured vegetable protein, mushroom, and walnuts seasoned with a savory marinade, then cooked until golden brown. Serve on corn tortillas topped with chopped cilantro, onion, and your favorite salsa.

Aqua colored dutch oven filled with textured vegetable protein and water.

Street tacos bring back so many memories of stumbling home after a night of drinking, then deciding to stop by the taco stand instead. There’s something about street tacos that just hits the spot every time. I don’t know if it’s the shiny tortilla that has been dipped in grease, the crunchiness of the onion, the aromatics of the cilantro, or the creaminess of the avocado salsa that makes them so irresistible.  

Blender full of light brown colored marinade for textured vegetable protein

As a vegan, now whenever I visit Mexico, I’m a little bit saddened that I won’t be sitting on a tall stool hunched over a plate of tacos on the closest street corner.  So what’s the next best thing?? Recreating them at home of course!! This is where TVP comes in but….

Finely chopped mushrooms in a aqua colored cast iron pan

What is TVP?

TVP stands for textured vegetable protein. It is a processed form of soybeans (the protein is separated from the whole soybeans) that is used as a meat substitute. It has the texture of ground beef but has no real flavor itself. This is actually a good thing because it means that it absorbs the flavor of the marinade or seasoning.

TVP, cooked mushrooms, and chopped walnut combined in an aqua colored cast iron pan

Where can I find TVP?

You can find it at your local grocery store. Bob’s Red Mill produces TVP and it is usually in the aisle with the other Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you have access to a Mexican market you can find it there too, usually sold in bulk bins.

Marinade poured over tvp mix cooking in an aqua colored cast iron pan

The Recipe: TVP Tacos

  • I decided to add mushrooms and walnuts to this to add a more meaty texture and flavor, that being said, both are optional. You can make this recipe with only textured vegetable protein.
  • If you want this to be truly authentic you need to add a little bit of oil to your griddle or comal when you heat up your tortillas.
  • I used street taco corn tortillas which are smaller than your regular sized ones, but you can also buy regular-sized corn tortillas, and cut them with a cookie-cutter into a smaller size.
  • Check out these recipes for Vegan Baja Fish Tacos, Vegan Rajas con Crema Tacos, and these Potato-Chorizo Tacos.
  • Enjoy!
A close up on 3 tvp tacos with double tortilla on a white plate with crumble paper over a gray and pink striped towel
3 tvp tacos with double tortilla on a white plate with crumble paper over a gray and pink striped towel and avocado salsa behind
A close up on 3 tvp tacos with double tortilla on a white plate with crumble paper over a gray and pink striped towel

TVP Street Tacos

TVP Tacos with a mix of TVP, mushrooms, and walnuts seasoned with a savory marinade. Served on corn tortillas with cilantro, onion and salsa. Recipe adapted from Amor y Sabor con Cesia
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: corn tortillas, mole and mushrooms, vegan tacos, walnuts
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 418kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Textured vegetable protein (TVP)
  • 3 cups Water
  • 1/4 cup Lime juice. fresh
  • ½ Onion, white
  • 1 Bay leaf

Seasoning Sauce

  • ¼ cup Soy sauce
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • ¼ Onion, white
  • ¼ tsp. Smoked Paprika
  • ¼ cup Water

Tacos

  • 1 tbsp. Oil
  • 1/2 cup Finely chopped walnuts or pecans
  • ½ cup Finely chopped Mushrooms
  • Small corn tortillas
  • ½ cup Chopped white onion
  • ½ cup Chopped cilantro
  • 2 Limes
  • Salsa of your choice

Instructions

  • Rinse TVP in cold water. Place TVP in large pot with 3 cups of water, lime juice, onion, and bay leaf. Simmer for 10 minutes.
  • While the TVP is simmering place the soy sauce, garlic cloves, onion, smoked paprika, and water in the blender and process until smooth.
  • Drain, rinse, and squeeze out all of the water possible from the TVP.
  • Heat a large sauté pan to medium-high heat add 1 tbsp. of oil (optional). Add the mushrooms and cook until golden brown, about 6-8 minutes, stir often. Add the TVP and the chopped walnuts.
  • Continue to cook for 3 – 4 minutes in the pan. Add the seasoning sauce and stir to combine.
  • Cook until the meat is golden brown and most of the liquid has evaporated, about 4 more minutes. Adjust seasoning if necessary with salt and pepper.
  • Heat up tortillas on a griddle or comal coated with a small amount of oil. To assemble the tacos place two tortillas on top of each other place filling in the center and sprinkle with onion and cilantro. Add a splash of lime juice, and your favorite salsa. Repeat this with the rest of the tortillas and filling.

Notes

  • I decided to add mushrooms and walnuts to this to add a more meaty texture and flavor, that being said, both are optional. You can make this recipe with only textured vegetable protein.
  • If you want this to be truly authentic you need to add a little bit of oil to your griddle or comal when you heat up your tortillas.
  • I used street taco corn tortillas which are smaller than your regular sized ones, but you can also buy regular-sized corn tortillas, and cut them with a cookie-cutter into a smaller size.
  • Street tacos in Mexico are made with two tortillas each.

Nutrition

Serving: 3tacos | Calories: 418kcal | Carbohydrates: 54g | Protein: 21g | Fat: 16g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 862mg | Potassium: 400mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 303IU | Vitamin C: 19mg | Calcium: 182mg | Iron: 5mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

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Known as the land of the seven moles, Oaxaca’s crown jewel is without a doubt Mole Negro. A dark smoky, slightly bitter, and incredibly rich sauce is paired with cauliflower in the vegan version.

Toasted peanuts, bread, tortillas, plantains, and pumpkin seeds in a saute pan.

Don’t let the ingredient list for this black mole scare you. Mole is quite simple to make, it’s only a little time consuming, but it is the combination of ingredients such as chile chilhuacle rojo and negro, chile mulato, chile pasilla, burnt tortilla, peanuts, raisins, pumpkin seeds, and chocolate that makes this dish so unique.

Charred tomatoes, tomatillos, garlic, and onion in a saute pan.

This particular version a little bit non traditional since it substitutes coconut oil for lard, goji berries for raisins, and has the addition of turmeric. All beautiful ingredients that serve to enrich the sauce while keeping its authentic flavor.

Dried chiles soaking in water in a stainless steal pot.

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

Chocolate being added to the mole negro sauce.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Oaxaca, is the creation of Fernanda Alvarez from @lahealthymexicana here she tells you a bit of her story.

Fernanda’s Story:

I was proudly born and raised in Mexico. Five years ago I arrived in the United States and I now call it my home. I am passionate about sharing health and well being through food, and I am a firm believer that you don’t need to consume animals, that what is needed is more superfoods, and more home-cooked meals.

When I was 15 years old I was diagnosed with hypoglycemia, but for a long time, I had been living with food intolerances that did not allow me to live a happy life.

Mole negro enmoladas on a talavera plate and a bright orange tablecloth with flowers behind it.

When I discovered and experienced that I could heal everything that was keeping me from living a healthy life with food, I decided to share it with the world so I could help other people live longer and better lives regardless of their intolerance or illness while at the same time nourishing themselves with delicious food.

Fork digging into a plate of mole negro enmoladas

The Recipe: Oaxacan Mole Negro

  • If you can’t find hazelnuts you can use almonds
  • You can also use cranberries instead of goji berries
  • If you are gluten-free, you can use gluten-free bread instead.
  • You can also serve your cauliflower enmoladas with this almond crema.
  • Chile chilhuacle is a chile native to Oaxaca that is hard to find out of the state. I order mine from here.
  • If you want to make this without oil you can toast all the ingredients in a dry pan, and instead of frying the sauce you can simmer it.
Fork taking a bite of enmoladas away from the plate.
Mole negro enmoladas on a talavera plate and a bright orange tablecloth with flowers behind it.

Oaxacan Mole Negro Cauliflower Enmoladas

Oaxaca’s crown jewel is without a doubt Mole Negro. A dark smoky, slightly bitter, and incredibly rich sauce is paired with cauliflower in the vegan version.
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: mole negro, oaxaca, traditional
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Extra virgin coconut oil
  • 1 cup Chile chilhuacle negro dried
  • 1 cup Chile chilhuacle rojo
  • 1 cup Chile Mulato
  • 1 cup Chile Pasilla
  • ¼ cup Sesame seeds
  • ¼ cup Peanuts raw
  • ¼ cup Pecans raw
  • ½ cup Hazelnuts raw
  • ¼ cup Pepitas pumpkin seeds, raw
  • 2 Corn tortillas
  • 3 Slices whole wheat bread
  • 2 Large red onions
  • 4 Garlic cloves peeled
  • 2 Ripe plantains peeled
  • ¼ cup Goji berries
  • 8 Plum tomatoes cut into dice
  • 10 Tomatillos husks removed, cut into dice
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. Dried oregano
  • 1 tsp.Dried thyme
  • 1 tsp. Ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. Ground turmeric
  • 5 Whole cloves
  • 5 Whole allspice
  • ¼ cup Coconut sugar
  • 1 cup Dark chocolate dairy-free
  • 4 Avocado leaves toasted

To Serve:

  • 10 corn tortillas
  • 1 Large head of cauliflower
  • ¼ cup Coconut oil extra virgin
  • Sea salt
  • 1 tsp. Smoked Paprika
  • 1 tsp. Ground cumin

Pickled Red Onions:

  • 1 Large red onin
  • 2 Limes juiced
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 1 tsp. Oregano

Crema:

  • 1 cup Sunflower seeds hulled, raw
  • 1 ½ cups Water
  • 1 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1 Lime juiced
  • 1 tsp. Nutritional yeast

Instructions

To make the crema:

  • Fill a large glass container with water and add the sunflower seeds. Let them soak overnight in the refrigerator. (Preferably one day before you make the mole.)
  • Drain the seeds.
  • Place the sunflower seeds, water, salt, lime juice, and nutritional yeast in the blender and process until smooth.
  • You can adjust the lime and salt to taste or even add some other spice like jalapeño, ginger, turmeric or nutmeg.

To Make the Mole:

  • Set a large sauté pan to medium-high heat add all the chiles (stems and seeds removed), and toast lightly on both sides. Transfer to a bowl with cold water and set aside for later.
  • In a large pot or wok, add 1 cup of coconut oil and heat to medium heat. Add sesame seeds, peanuts, nuts, hazelnuts, pumpkin seeds, bread, tortilla, onion, garlic, plantain slices, and goji berries. Add them one at a time until they are a deep golden brown, then remove them from the pan, set them aside, and add the next ingredient.
  • Add the diced tomatoes and tomatillos to the pot, season them with salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, oregano, thyme, ground ginger, cumin, clove, turmeric, and allspice, cook until golden brown. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • Place all the fried ingredients plus the drained dried chiles in the blender, and process until smooth. Strain this mixture.
  • Heat a large pot to medium heat and add the remaining 1 cup of coconut oil, fry the sauce for 5 minutes and add the 5 cups of vegetable broth.
  • Add the coconut sugar, chocolate, and avocado leaves (previously toasted). Simmer for 45 min at medium heat, stirring constantly to avoid sticking.
  • While de mole is simmering, cut the cauliflower in small florets and sauté it with a little bit of coconut oil. Seasons with cumin, paprika, and salt to taste. Cover and let it pan steam for about 10 minutes or until tender. Add a little bit of water to the pan if necessary.
  • Prepare the crema (instructions above) and marinate the red onion with the lime juice, water, and oregano.
  • Fill the tortillas (heat them up for a couple of seconds in the microwave so they are easy to fold), and fold them in half.
  • Pour the finished mole
    sauce on top of the folded tortillas and drizzle some crema, and top with
    pickled red onions.

Notes

Chef’s Notes:
• If you can’t find hazelnuts you can use almonds
• You can also use cranberries instead of goji berries
• If you are gluten free, you can use gluten-free bread instead.
• You can also serve your cauliflower enmoladas with this almond crema.

Barbacoa means so many different things to different people, as with any other Mexican dish it varies from state to state. This traditional vegan barbacoa Sinaloense uses Gardein beefless tips instead of pork or beef, but still holds all the chiles, spices, and flavors that characterize barbacoa in Sinaloa. 

Glass bowl filled with gardein beefless tips soaking in water

It is a hearty stew full of vegetables like potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, and olives simmered in a mixture of Anaheim, chile guajillo, cumin, oregano, and beer. In Sinaloa, it is served with cold macaroni salad and refried beans.

Stainless steel pot filled with dried chiles and water

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

White pot with onion, tomato, and anaheim chile.

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Sinaloa, is the creation of the talented Fabby Gastelum, and here she is sharing her story with us.

White pot with onion, carrots, tomatoes, and anaheim chile.

Fabby’s Story:

Hi my name is Fabiola Gastelum and I was born in Culiacán Sinaloa. My family and I moved here when I was 7 years old, we lived in Mesa Arizona and I spent all my childhood there. That’s Home! I currently live in Albuquerque New Mexico with my toddler and my husband.

Small saute pan with browned beefless tips

Growing up I remember hating the feeling of knowing where my food came from. I would cry after every zoo trip thinking of the animals incarcerated there. I always considered myself a “tree hugger” because I hated plastic and I would try and safe water. When I became a mother I became so conscious of what products I used on my son -all-natural plant-based products. He never had cow milk and very little red meats. I remember watching What The Health for the first time on August 2017 (knowing that I would come out of it feeling different) that day our lives changed.

Vegan barbacoa sinaloense in a blue and white pot with a wooden spoon in it

My inner wish of always wanting to be vegetarian finally made it out. And by vegetarian I mean growing up I watched a kids show where one of the girls was an animal activist and I dreamt of having her courage to fight for animal rights. Our vegan journey began 1 week after that. We stopped buying, wearing, eating and exploiting animals. As much as I wished our journey would have come sooner I’m happy to say we are one big happy vegan family! I have not left my culture, my food or my identity. I’m a true Sinaloense and I will continue to veganize my states dishes! #LosVeganosComenMejor

Vegan barbacoa sinaloense on a white plate with macaroni salad and refried beans, and flour tortillas

The Recipe: Vegan Barbacoa Sinaloense

  • If you can’t find Gardein beefless tips you can use mushrooms, TVP or seitan or your favorite meat substitute.
  • If you can’t find no-chicken or no-beef bouillon cubes you can use vegetable stock instead of water.
  • Adding beer is very common in the state of Sinaloa and I wanted to make this as traditional as possible. Yes it’s safe for children since it’s only a small amount and the alcohol taste disappears with all the other spices. I added Michelob.
  • The beefless tips are already seasoned, I didn’t want that flavor to overpower the barbacoa. I washed them very well and added a squeeze of lime juice and let it rest for 15 mins with lime juice and water. It helped, and the “meat” got the original taste of the barbacoa spices added but this is totally optional
A closeup of a flour tortilla scooping up vegan barbacoa sinaloense from a white plate
Vegan barbacoa sinaloense on a white plate with macaroni salad and refried beans

Vegan Barbacoa Sinaloense

This traditional vegan barbacoa Sinaloense uses Gardein beefless tips instead of pork or beef, but still holds all the chiles, spices, and flavors that characterize barbacoa in Sinaloa.
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: gardein beefless tips, sinaloa, vegan
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 422kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 package Gardein Homestyle Beefless Tips *see note
  • 5 Small russet potatoes (about 4 cups diced potatoes)
  • 5 Small carrots (about 1 ½ cups diced Carrots)
  • 3 Small tomatoes (about 1 ¼ cup diced tomato)
  • 1/4 White onion (about 1/3 cup diced onion)
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 1 Anaheim chile, fresh
  • 5 Guajillo chiles, dried
  • 1 Pinch Cumin (about 1/4 tsp.)
  • 2 Not Beef Bouillon Cubes
  • 1 Not-Chick’n Bouillon Cube
  • 1 tsp. Dried oregano
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup Manzanilla olives
  • 2 Bay leaves, dried
  • 1/4 cup Preferred beer, *see notes

Instructions

  • Fill a medium pot with water and bring to a boil. Add guajillo chiles and let simmer slowly for 5 – 8 minutes to soften the chiles.
  • Continue by dicing tomato, anaheim chile and onion in to very small-fine pieces.
  • Heat a large pot to medium-low heat and add 1 tsp. oil (optional). Add onion, Anaheim chile, and tomato and sweat for 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender,
  • Meanwhile chop carrots and potatoes into small-medium chunks. Add only carrots and olives to pot; cover and continue to cook for another 3-5 mins.
  • When guajillo chiles have softened, drain, and place in the blender with 1 cup of water, garlic, cumin, dried oregano, and a pinch of salt and black pepper, blend till smooth.
  • Take that chile mixture and strain it, add strained liquid to pot and simmer for another 5 mins
  • Add potatoes and both not-beef cubes, 1 chkn cube and 2 bay leaves. Increase heat to medium, cover, and keep cooking for another 10 mins depending how soft or hard you like your potatoes to be. (If necessary add more water.)
  • Heat a sauté pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tsp. of oil. Add beefless tips and brown them on both sides until golden brown.
  • Add the beefless tips to the pot with the vegetables, add another 2 cups of water, and ¼ cup of beer. Stir and let cook on low heat for 5 more mins. (You can add more than 2 cups of water. Today I did because I wanted my barbacoa to have plenty of broth. Add as much or little as you like.)
  • 1Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Turn off heat, make some frijoles puercos and sopa fria to go with it and voilà

Notes

*The beer is only for a different kick on the taste of this barbacoa, in Sinaloa (my Mexico native state) adding some beer to it is very common and I wanted to make this as traditional as possible. Yes it’s safe for children since it’s only a small amount and the alcohol taste disappears with all the other spices. I added Michelob. (of course I drank the remaining of it #bosslife #momlife #winning)
*The beefless tips are already seasoned, I didn’t want that flavor to overpower the barbacoa. I washed them very well and added a squeeze of lime juice and let it rest for 15 mins with lime juice and water. It helped, and the “meat” got the original taste of the barbacoa spices added but this is totally optional

Nutrition

Calories: 422kcal | Carbohydrates: 71g | Protein: 20g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 635mg | Potassium: 1708mg | Fiber: 11g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 14753IU | Vitamin C: 36mg | Calcium: 100mg | Iron: 4mg

This vegan arroz con leche is creamy, delicious, and easy to make. It is topped with a sprinkle of freshly ground cinnamon and studded with raisins. I love it when it’s served cold on a hot day, but in the winter nothing beats a cup of warm arroz con leche. It’s one of those classic Mexican desserts that you make over and over again.

Milk and rice cooking in a large pot with a cinnamon stick.

Mexican Arroz con Leche

Mexican rice pudding is the perfect combination of milk, sugar, cinnamon, rice, and raisins. Depending on what region of Mexico you grew up in you might have added fresh fruit, orange or lime zest, and even rum.

Raisins added to the pot with the rice and milk.

Did you know that there are many versions of arroz con leche? There is Dominican, Costa Rican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Guatemalan….and the list goes on and on. Most of them are similar but each country has its own variation that makes it unique. In Puerto Rico they use coconut milk, in Spain they add orange zest, in Cuba, they add condensed milk, and in Jamaica, they add allspice or nutmeg.

A wooden spoon full of vegan Mexican rice pudding suspended over a pot.

But it doesn’t matter what country you are from, arroz con leche evokes memories of the smell of cinnamon and a big pot of boiling milk on the stove, and the song, “ Arroz con leche, me quiero casar con un señorita…..”

How to Make Arroz con Leche Vegan

To make this arroz con leche without dairy I did a test between three different types of plant milk: soy milk, oat milk, and almond coconut milk. I used the same recipe for all of them and had some really picky taste-testers (my children) evaluate the results.

Two glass cups of vegan arroz con leche surrounded by cinnamon sticks and raisins.

The Test: Soy milk, Oat Milk or Almond Milk

The clear winner of the taste test was soy, then oat milk, and in the last place was almond-coconut milk. Soy milk resembled cow’s milk the most because of the high-fat content. The one that was made with oat milk was deliciously sweet, but it gave it a yellowish color and it wasn’t as creamy as the soy milk. The almond-coconut milk was creamy but did have a distinctive taste of coconut. My kids loved all of them, but they preferred the soy by far. I know a lot of people don’t do soy, so if you don’t, I recommend the oat milk instead.

A close up of vegan Mexican rice pudding with raisins with the spoon digging in.

The Recipe

  • You can use any plant milk of your choice, but we found that soy was the one that mimicked the taste of cow’s milk the best.
  • Oat milk also makes a yummy arroz con leche.
  • You can add fresh fruit, orange zest, dried fruit, nutmeg, and even vegan condensed milk.
  • I decided to use long-grain rice because it’s what is most accessible, but using short-grain rice will give a creamier result.
Vegan arroz con leche in a glass goblet with a golden spoon inserted into the cup.

Vegan Arroz con Leche

Vegan Arroz con Leche, a traditional Mexican classic made dairy-free with soy milk, cinnamon. and raisins.
5 from 5 votes
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cinnamon, dairyfree, raisins, rice pudding, vegan
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 8 people (Serving size 1/2 cup)
Calories: 311kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Long grain-rice
  • 1 Ceylon cinnamon stick 2 -inch
  • 3 cups Water
  • 4 cups Soy milk
  • ½ – 1 cup Sugar or your sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup of raisins optional

Instructions

  • In a large pot combine water, cinnamon stick, and rice. Bring water to a simmer and simmer slowly for 15 min.
  • Add soy milk to the pot and simmer for 10 more minutes.
  • Add ½ – 1 cup of the sugar (depending on desired sweetness), and simmer for another 10 minutes or until the arroz con leche has reached the right consistency.
  • Remove from the heat, add raisins, and let the rice cool slightly. It will thicken as it cools.
  • Sprinkle with ground cinnamon before serving. Serve warm, or let cool in the refrigerator and serve cold.

Notes

You can use any plant milk of your choice, but we found that soy was the one that mimicked the taste of cow’s milk the best. Oat milk also makes a yummy arroz con leche. You can add fresh fruit, orange zest, dried fruit, nutmeg, and even vegan condensed milk. I decided to use long-grain rice because it’s what is most accessible, but using short grain rice will give a creamier result.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cups | Calories: 311kcal | Carbohydrates: 68g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 68mg | Potassium: 268mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 40g | Vitamin A: 464IU | Vitamin C: 9mg | Calcium: 181mg | Iron: 1mg

Although dorastable.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates.

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

This sweet and tender semita bread is designed to be eaten with your morning café de olla or a cold glass of your favorite plant-milk. Piloncillo, raisins, cinnamon, orange zest, and anise are studded throughout the semita, making it an incredibly fragrant and delicious Mexican pan dulce.

Flour, water, yeast in a large stainless steel bowl

Origin of Semita Bread

In the 16th century, a group of Semitic Jews came to the new world, brought by Luis de Carvajal y de la Cueva to settle what is now the state of Nuevo Leon, escaping the Spanish Inquisition that was in full force at the time. This Jewish community colonized the states of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, and parts of what is now Texas, and continued to practice their faith in secret. It is thought that this community ate bread during Passover very similar to what we consider semita bread now, with the exception of the piloncillo and raisins. The origin of this bread, however, can be traced back to Spain and Islamic North Africa.

Dough for semita bread mixed in a stainless steel bowl

Semita vs. Cemita

Semita is not the same as cemita, and to confuse things even more sometimes they are both spelled the same. Semita is the sweet bread recipe I have for you today, made with piloncillo, raisins, and sometimes nuts. Cemita is a savory roll, with sesame seeds on top, that is used to make tortas, huge tortas that are very famous in Puebla.

ball of dough in a stainless steel bowl with dough hook in it

Our Vegan Mexico Project

This recipe is part of an amazing project called Our Vegan Mexico, where 32 talented cooks will be showcasing, right here on Dora’s Table, 32 vegan Mexican recipes. Each recipe will be representing one state of the Mexican union.

dough hook stretching the dough to show the texture

With this project, I am hoping to encourage the Mexican community in the U.S., and the people of my country to take a chance and make the change to a plant-based diet. This recipe, which is representing the state of Chihuahua, is the creation of the talented Liliana Arellanes from @veganocosmico and here she is sharing her story with us.

Ball of dough resting in a stainless steel bowl

Liliana’s Story

My Name is Liliana Arellanes; I am from Chihuahua Mexico but have been living in Los Angeles, CA for the last 30 years. My path to Veganism began 25 years ago, for two fundamental reasons, respect, and compassion for all living beings, and respect for myself. Understanding above all, that it is not necessary to kill another living being in order to eat. In this way, we will be nourishing ourselves with Light and not death.

Pecans, raisins, orange zest and pilincillo are added to the dough in the bowl

 

I share the recipe of the famous “CHORREADAS DE PILONCILLO” a typical bread of the region, with a delicious flavor reminiscent of “small town” comfort food. I have added my personal touch, with raisins, nuts, and fragrant orange zest. It is an exquisite handmade sweet bread, with a spongy crumb that you can enjoy fresh out of the oven with a café de olla or a glass of almond milk.

 

dough mixed well and shaped into a ball again

The Recipe: Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  • You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.

four balls of dough on a parchment lined sheet tray

  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.

basket of mexican semita bread and a white plate with slices of semita

a closeup of a piece of semita bread being held in a hand

Three mexican semita bread rolls in a basket on a light blue background

Mexican Semita Bread (Semitas Chorreadas)

Mexican Semita Bread, studded with pecans, raisins, orange zest and piloncillo.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: pan dulce, semita bread, vegan mexican breakfast
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Resting Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings: 4 Medium sized rolls
Calories: 824kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 ½ cup Bread flour
  • ½ cup Dark brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. Ground anise seed
  • 1 tsp Freshly ground cinnamon (Ceylon)
  • 1/3 cup Coconut butter, about 3 oz
  • 1 ½ cups Warm water
  • ½ cup Chopped pecans
  • ½ cup Raisins, soaked in the juice of one orange
  • 1 tsp. Orange zest
  • 1 tsp. Active dry yeast
  • 3.5 oz Piloncillo (about ½ cup)
  • ½ tsp. Salt

Instructions

  • In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients flour, sugar, anise, cinnamon, yeast, and salt
  • Add the warm water and coconut butter to the bowl and knead.
  • I use the hook attachment on my mixer at medium-low speed for 4-6 minutes or until the dough has come off the sides of the bowl and is stretchy but not sticky.
  • If you don’t have a mixer you can knead by hand for 10 minutes or until you reach the desired consistency.
  • Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a kitchen towel and let rise for an hour.
  • To prepare your piloncillo, place it in a plastic bag, and crush it with the help of a hammer until finely ground.
  • Separate the crushed piloncillo un half. Place half of the piloncillo in a small bowl and mix with 1 tsp. Flour. This will be used to top the semitas before baking.
  • Once the dough is done rising, add the reaming half of the piloncillo, pecans, and orange zest and knead until all the ingredients are mixed evenly throughout.
  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • Divide the dough in four, roll the pieces tightly into rounds, and place on a sheet tray lined with parchment. Press down on the rounds lightly. Brush the rounds with your favorite plant milk, and top with the piloncillo and flour mixture. Press down slightly on the piloncillo topping with your hands.
  • Cover the sheet tray with a kitchen towel and let the dough rise for 20 minutes.
  • Bake for 20 minutes at 350°F.

Notes

  • These semitas are the best when eaten still warm right out of the oven. If you eat them the next day be sure to warm them up before eating.
  •  You can use ½ whole wheat flour and half unbleached white flour to substitute the bread flour.
  • The nuts and raisins are optional, but I think they add a special touch.
  • You can substitute the coconut butter with vegan butter.
  • You can use plant milk instead of water in the recipe, just make sure it’s warm.

Nutrition

Calories: 824kcal | Carbohydrates: 149g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 263mg | Potassium: 381mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 50g | Vitamin C: 3.1mg | Calcium: 82mg | Iron: 3.1mg

This Strawberry Frose Margarita is the best of both worlds. Sweet strawberries are blended with rose wine, tequila, lime juice, and orange liquor for a frozen cocktail that’s so refreshing and delicious, that it will be impossible not to make it over and over again this summer.

tequila, cointreau, lime juice, strawberry popsicle in a blender for strawberry frose margarita

What is Frose??

Basically, frose is frozen rose. A slushy made out of rose wine, ice, and sometimes strawberries. It became super popular in 2018 for its simplicity and its pretty pink color. For this recipe, I chose to make the ultimate combination of frose and strawberry margaritas.

strawberry frose margarita mix just blended

It was actually my husband’s idea, but I wasn’t really convinced at first. I love tequila, so the thought of mixing it with rose kind of freaked me out. I was wrong!! I admit it. This is now my favorite margarita of all time. If this doesn’t make you break out into a happy dance I don’t know what will.

Margarita Week

Another year, another margarita week over at Hola Jalapeño! I know I’ve mentioned this before, but I will say it again, I’m a total margarita snob. I can’t stand sickly sweet, sour mix, fake margaritas, or crazy combination barely a margarita drinks.

salt rimmed margarita glass filled with crushed ice on top of a colorful napkink

This is my third year participating in margarita week, and it has definitely changed my perspective on what a margarita is. Even though I still love a classic margarita, there are some amazing flavor combinations you can do, and still make an excellent drink like this guava lime margarita, spicy raspberry jalapeño margarita, vanilla and piloncillo margarita, or this rhubarb citrus margarita.

strawberry frose margarita poured over margarita glass with ice

You can find my previous entries for Margarita week here:

Pineapple-Chile Margarita

Frozen Prickly Pear Margarita

Spicy Hibiscus Ice Margarita

Strawberry frose margarita in a salt rimmed margarita glass decorated with a lime slice

The Recipe: Strawberry Frose Margarita

  • When choosing your rose for this recipe choose the one you like to drink. I like my rose on the dry side, but if you prefer sweet rose use that instead.
  • I highly recommend Corralejo Tequila (reposado) for this. It’s my favorite for margaritas.
  • I made this recipe two ways, both ways are delicious. You can either process everything in the blender, the margarita will be like a slushy, or you can crush the ice with the blender or with a bag and mallet then pour the chilled margarita over it.
  • I used a salt rim, but a sugar rim would work as well.
  • I used a strawberry paleta (popsicle) instead of fresh berries, and I was very happy with the result. I totally forgot to buy the strawberries and I had paletas in the freezer!

Strawberry frose margarita in a salt rimmed margarita glass decorated with a lime slice

Strawberry frose margarita in a salt rimmed margarita glass decorated with a lime slice

Strawberry Frose Margarita

This Strawberry Frose Margarita is the best of both worlds. Sweet strawberries are blended with rose wine, tequila, lime juice, and orange liquor for a frozen cocktail that’s so refreshing and delicious, that it will be impossible not to make it over and over again this summer.
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Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: frose, margarita, strawberry cocktail
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 1 Large Margarita
Calories: 235kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Corralejo tequila
  • 1.5 oz Your favorite Rose wine, chilled
  • 1 oz Fresh lime juice
  • 1 oz Cointreau
  • 1 Strawberry popsicle (made with real fruit)
  • 2 cups Ice

Instructions

  • Remove the popsicle from the popsicle stick and cut into 3 pieces. Place in the blender with the tequila, rose, lime juice, Cointreau, and ice. Process until smooth, like a slushy.
  • Pour into a salt-rimmed glass, and garnish with a slice of lime or strawberry.

Notes

• When choosing your rose for this recipe choose one you like to drink. I like my rose on the dry side, but if you prefer sweet rose use that instead.
• I used a salt rim, but a sugar rim would work as well.

Nutrition

Calories: 235kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Sodium: 6mg | Potassium: 42mg | Sugar: 19g | Vitamin C: 8.5mg

This Vegan Tres Leches cake is nothing short of a dream. A dream come true!! A sweet vanilla cake is soaked in almond, macadamia, and oat milk, covered in silky coconut whipped cream, then topped with strawberries.

Glass bowl filled with the ingredients to make vegan tres leches cake

I had avoided veganizing this recipe for so long, thinking that I couldn’t possibly get it right or that I had to make vegan condensed milk, and who has time to make vegan condensed milk?? I don’t know why, but inspiration finally hit and this vegan version of homemade tres leches cake was born.

Tres leches cake batter in a glass bowl with a blue whisk

What is Tres Leches Cake?

Tres leches (three milks) cake is traditionally a vanilla sponge cake soaked in condensed milk, evaporated milk, and cream (media crema). It is topped with whipped cream and berries or assorted fruit, and sometimes cinnamon. On occasion, rum or rompope (a sort of Mexican eggnog) is added to the milk mixture. To make this vegan I decided to use almond, macadamia nut, and oat milk. The combination proved to be ridiculously good!

Tres leches cake resting on a rack

Tres Leches Cake History

This is a tricky one. Some say that tres leches cake originated in Nicaragua, but Mexico certainly claims it as its own, and Cuba and Puerto Rico have their own versions of well. Tres leches cake became popular in Latin America in the 19th century, possibly due to Nestle publishing a recipe in the back of its cans of condensed milk. They, however, did not invent it, even before then you can find various versions of milk-soaked cakes way before the 19th century. Without a doubt, there is some influence of European colonization, thus there are some who believe tres leches is a new world version of  European milk soaked cakes topped with cream, like tiramisu.

Milk being poured on tres leches cake in a red baking dish

The Challenges of Making an Authentic Tres Leches Cake Vegan

It wasn’t as difficult as I had imagined, because I decided to completely leave out the condensed milk. Instead, I combined three plant-based milks with sugar and reduce the liquid by 1/3. The cake itself was the biggest challenge. The cake needed to be dry or maybe not dry, but at least not overly moist. The omnivore version is made without oil and mostly eggs which presented a huge problem in the vegan version. After 4 tries I came up with a cake that is dry enough to absorb the milk, but strong enough to not become mush instantly.

A slice taken out of a tres leches cake in a red baking dish

I tried 2 types of coconut whipped cream. I decided not to make my own but go with a store-bought option. First I tried So Delicious Coco Whip which turned out too sweet and heavy for my taste for this cake. I settled with Reddi-whip’s Coconut Whipped Topping which is light and airy, and not too sweet.

Tres leches cake on a white plate topped with a sliced strawberry

The Recipe: Vegan Tres Leches Cake

  • It’s very important to make the cake the day before so you can let it sit out and dry out a little bit.
  • I used almond, macadamia nut, and oat milk, but you can use any combination you prefer. If you like coconut, I suggest coconut milk.
  • Top with strawberries or assorted berries. The acid in the berries cut the sweetness of the cake.
  • If you want to make your own whipped topping I recommend this recipe.
  • Enjoy!!

Tres leches cake on a white plate topped with a sliced strawberry

Tres leches cake on a white plate topped with a sliced strawberry

Vegan Tres Leches Cake

This Vegan Tres Leches cake is nothing short of a dream. A dream come true!! A sweet vanilla cake is soaked in almond, macadamia, and oat milk, covered in silky coconut whipped cream, then topped with strawberries.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: tres leches cake, vegan mexican recipes
Resting Time: 10 hours
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 10 Servings
Calories: 299kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Cake:

  • 1 ½ cups All-purpose flour
  • 1 cup Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. White vinegar
  • 5 tbsp Vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 1 cup Water

Milk Syrup:

  • 1 cup Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 1 cup Macadamia nut milk, unsweetened
  • 1 cup Oat milk, unsweetened
  • ½ cup Sugar, granulated

Whipped Topping:

  • 2 cans Reddi-whip Coconut Whipped Topping
  • 1 pint Strawberries, hulled and sliced

Instructions

To make the cake

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Line the bottom of a 8 x 13” baking dish with parchment paper and lightly grease with vegetable oil.
  • In a medium bowl combine the all-purpose flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt. Mix well.
  • Form three depressions (small holes) in the flour. In the first depression add the vanilla, in the second one the vinegar, and in the last one the oil.
  • Pour the water over the top and using a whisk, mix until combined.
  • Pour the batter into the baking dish and bake in the middle rack of the oven, for 25-30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  • Remove from oven. Let cake cool in pan for 10 min, and remove from baking dish. Remove parchment paper and let cake cool completely on a rack. Leave it out at room temperature without covering it, overnight.

To make the milk syrup

  • While your cake is baking. Combine the three milks and sugar in a medium sauce pot. Bring to a simmer and let cook for 20 min. Remove from heat and let cool in the refrigerator until ready to use. You should have about 2 cups of milk syrup.

Assembly

  • The following day, using a serrated knife, gently cut the dome off the top of your cake. Poke the surface of the cake several times with a fork or a steak knife.
  • Place your cake inside of the baking dish and pour enough milk syrup over to soak the cake. (You might have some syrup left.) Place in your fridge and let cake soak for 30 min.
  • When you’re ready to serve, top the cake with the coconut whipped topping and spread with a spatula. (Don’t add the whipped topping to the cake unless you’re ready to serve it.)
  • Arrange the sliced strawberries on top of the whipped topping and serve.

Notes

It's very important to make the cake the day before so you can let it sit out and dry out a little bit.
• I used almond, macadamia nut, and oat milk, but you can use any combination you prefer. If you like coconut, I suggest coconut milk.
• Top with strawberries or assorted berries. The acid in the berries cut the sweetness of the cake.
• If you want to make your own whipped topping I recommend this recipe.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 299kcal | Carbohydrates: 67g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 306mg | Potassium: 114mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 44g | Vitamin A: 55IU | Vitamin C: 27.8mg | Calcium: 121mg | Iron: 1.7mg

Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed to perfection. What makes these so good is that the masa is spiced with guajillo chiles, coconut oil, and cumin. They are so delicious and 100% vegan and gluten-free.

Jackfruit simmering in red chile sauce in a cast iron pan

These are the first tamales I ever learned how to make. Back when I didn’t know how to make tamales, my dad invited me to the family restaurant to learn. Over the years we had helped on several occasions with the spreading of the masa on the husk and the folding, but I had never done the whole process from start to finish. Tamales rojos are very typical of the northern Mexico, they are usually filled with pork and are very small in size, but with a pretty equal ratio of masa to filling.

Masa for tamales in a silver bowl

The thing about learning how to cook in a restaurant is that you learn how to make huge quantities of food. That day we must’ve made more than 200 tamales! Believe me, it was a few years before I decided to make tamales again all by myself. When I became vegan, I was very sad at the thought of not having good tamales again, and frankly the thought of tamales filled with veggies didn’t appeal to me at the moment.

Tamales wrapped in corn husk on a blue back ground

However, after some experimentation with jackfruit, I decided to veganize this recipe from the family restaurant. The result was shockingly similar to the original ones. So much so, that my omnivore husband was tricked into thinking that the tamales weren’t vegan!!

Tamales arranged in a steamer pot

This recipe is part of my ebook Vegan Tamales Unwrapped. After making these red chile jackfruit tamales I became so obsessed with making vegan tamales that I decided to make my obsession into an ebook. It has 50 detailed pictures on how to make vegan tamales from making the masa to spreading and wrapping.

vegan tamales ebook

Every possible aspect of tamal making is explored, the type of fats, wrappers, fillings, cooking methods. There’s even an option for oil free tamales. It includes both savory and sweet tamal recipes such as:

  • Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales
  • Mole Tamales
  • Salsa Verde Jackfruit Tamales
  • Chocolate Tamales
  • Strawberry Tamales
  • Lime Tamales

It is available for purchase on Amazon for $6.99. Sadly it is only available in ebook format, but if you don’t have a kindle you can also purchase it on itunes to read on your mac devices. I am so proud of this book and I know you will enjoy it too!

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel

The Recipe: Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

  • Masa harina is dried nixtamalized corn flour. It is used in Mexico to make tortillas, tamales, sopes, etc. The brand most commonly found is Maseca, but the only non-gmo organic one I’ve found is Bob’s Red Mill
  • I found coconut oil to be the most flavorful fat to use in this recipe. I recommend you use refined coconut oil so the coconut flavor doesn’t affect the tamales. If you use unrefined coconut oil you will get a coconutty flavor.
  • If you have a hard time finding jackfruit, (I find mine at Trader Joe’s) you can use mushrooms instead.
  • If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Red chile jackfruit tamales in a white and green tea towel

Red Chile Jackfruit Tamales

These red chile jackfruit tamales are made with spicy guajillo chile seasoned jackfruit and masa, stuffed inside corn husks and steamed until tender.
5 from 8 votes
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: vegan mexican recipes, vegan tamales
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 18 - 24 Tamales
Calories: 91kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Guajillo Chile Sauce

  • 20 (4 oz._ Guajillo chiles, dry, seeded
  • 3-4 Arbol chiles, dried, seeded
  • 6 cloves Garlic
  • 1/2 White onion, chopped
  • 2 cups Chile soaking liquid

Filling

  • 4 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans (20 oz.) Green jackfruit in brine
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce

Dough

  • 1 cup (8 oz.) Refined coconut oil, room temperature
  • 4 cups (1 lb. 2 oz.) Masa harina
  • 1 ½ tsp. Baking powder
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Salt, kosher
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Cumin, ground
  • 3 ½ cups Vegetable broth or stock
  • 1 ½ cups Reserved guajillo chile sauce
  • 30 Corn husks

Instructions

To prepare the corn husks

  • Soak the corn husks in hot water, in a large pot or in your kitchen sink. Place a plate over them to weigh them down so they are completely submerged. Let them soak for at least an hour.

To make the sauce

  • Place the chiles in a small sauce pot and cover with water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and let cook for about 10 minutes. Drain the chiles and reserve 2 cups of the soaking liquid. Place the chiles, garlic, onion, and soaking liquid in the blender and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and strain. You should end up with about 3 cups of sauce.

To make the filling

  • Drain the jackfruit. Rinse, and pat with paper towels. Cut out the core of the jackfruit (tip of the triangle pieces), and cut pieces in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan set to medium heat. Add minced garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring often. Add the jackfruit and cook for 3 -4 minutes or until it begins to brown. Pour 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile sauce and reduce heat to low-medium. Simmer for 20 minutes or until jackfruit begins to break down and the sauce has thickened slightly. Use a fork to shred the jackfruit as it cooks down. Season with salt and pepper and let cool.

To make the dough

  • Beat the coconut oil, on medium-high speed, with an electric mixer for 1 minute. Add the baking powder, cumin, salt, and beat for 1 minute to incorporate into the coconut oil.
  • Add half of the masa harina to the bowl, pour in half of the vegetable stock, and beat to incorporate. After it is completely incorporated, add the other half of masa harina, vegetable stock, and 1 ½ cups of the guajillo chile puree. Beat at low speed, until thoroughly mixed. It should have the consistency of a thick cake batter. If necessary, add more vegetable stock until you reach that consistency. Taste the dough, and add more salt if necessary. It should be a little bit salty.
  • For lighter and fluffier tamales, let the dough rest for an hour in the refrigerator. Remove the dough from the fridge and rebeat it, adding enough liquid to get it to the consistency it had before.
  • Remove the corn husks from the water and set on paper towels. Reserve the largest husks to wrap the tamales and the small ones to line the steamer.

To set up your steamer

  • Fill the bottom with water making sure the water is not touching the steamer rack. Line the rack and sides of the steamer pot with corn husks. Set aside.

To wrap the tamales

  • Pull 24 pencil thin strips off of the corn husks and set aside. Take a husk and dry off the excess water with a paper towel. Place the husk in your hand with the tapered side away from you and the smooth side up. Using a spoon, spread 2-3 tbsp. of the dough (¼ inch thick) onto the corn husk, forming a 3 - 4 inch square. Leave a border of at least 3/4 inch on each side of the square.
  • Place 1 ½ tbsp. of the filling in the center of the dough. Bring the two long sides of the corn husk together, this will cause the masa to surround the filling, and roll them in the same direction around the tamal. (If the husk is too small, fold one of the long sides towards the center, and then fold the other long side on top.) Fold down the empty tapered section of the corn husk, forming a closed bottom. This will leave the top of the tamal open. Tie with a corn husk strip to secure the bottom of the tamal.
  •  Place the tamal in the steamer vertically leaning against the side of the pot, with the open end on top. Repeat this process until you run out of dough and all the tamales are in the steamer. Cover them with a layer of corn husks. If the steamer is not full, fill the empty spaces with more corn husks. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and cook for 40 minutes. Check the tamales, when they separate easily from the corn husk it means they are done. If they are not done, steam for 10 more minutes and check again.
  • Remove steamer from the heat and let sit covered for 10 minutes. Uncover and let cool for at least an hour. Don’t be alarmed if the tamales seem really soft. As they cool, they will firm up.

Video

Notes

If you would like to make these with fresh masa, replace the masa harina with 2 lbs. of fresh masa and use only 3/4 cup of vegetable stock. To substitute the coconut oil, you can use 8 oz. of vegetable oil or vegetable shortening. For tamales without fat, use 8 oz of cooked, unsweetened pumpkin.

Nutrition

Calories: 91kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 498mg | Potassium: 94mg | Fiber: 2g | Vitamin A: 320IU | Vitamin C: 0.9mg | Calcium: 58mg | Iron: 2mg


Just so you know, we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and may collect a share from the links on this page.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema. They are crazy easy to make, and are so good you’ll be making them again and again.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

In Mexico these are known simply as encacahuatadas, and are a classic home cooked dish. They are usually filled with chicken, but your favorite vegetable filling will go great with these. They would make a great dinner, or even a good brunch option.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Let me just say that I am obsessed with this sauce. I have been putting it on everything! So far it is perfect with the enchiladas, but you can also put it on your baked potatoes, polenta, pasta, tacos, buddha bowls, and tofu. I’m one of those people that falls in love with a sauce or dish and then I makes it over and over again until I get tired it. This is one of those sauces. So you definitely have to try it.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Summer is coming up and I am so not ready to have all the kids home. Not ready!! The first couple of weeks are always a little rough, but once we get into a groove we really have fun. My two older ones are always arguing and bothering each other, which can get really stressful sometimes, but our sweet baby is always all smiles. What are some of your summer plans?? I’ll tell you what I am ready for, all the delicious summer fruit. 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

The Recipe: Spicy Peanut Sauce Enchiladas

  • Your favorite veggie filling will be perfect with these
  • If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds.
  • Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.
  • You can use cashew or almond crema
  • Do not place these in the oven because they will fall apart.

 

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.

Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens

These spicy peanut sauce enchiladas, also known as encacahuatadas are smoky, creamy, savory, and full of umami. They are filled with sautéed mushrooms, and braised greens with hominy, bathed in a spicy guajillo-peanut sauce, and drizzled with almond crema.
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Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: peanut enchiladas, spicy peanut sauce, vegan enchiladas
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 387kcal
Author: Dora S.

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 8 Guajillo Chiles stems and seeds removed, rinsed
  • 1-2 Chipotle pepper in adobo
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • 1 cup Peanuts, toasted
  • 1 Plum tomato, roasted
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground clove
  • 1 cup Vegetable stock

Filling

  • 1 lb. Mushrooms. cremini sliced
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 oz. Spinach or other leafy green, roughly chopped
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) Hominy, drained, rinsed
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 1 cup Almond crema

Instructions

To make the peanut sauce:

  • Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Drop in the guajillo chiles and turn heat down to a simmer, let simmer for 10 min.
  • Drain guajillo chiles and place in blender with peanuts, chipotle chiles, garlic, roasted tomato, clove, and vegetable stock. Blend until smooth. If necessary add more stock until you reach the desired consistency.If you do not have a high powered blender, strain the sauce. Set aside.

To make the filling:

  • Add ¼ cup of water or vegetable stock to a large sauté pan set to medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until almost all the moisture has evaporated from the mushrooms and they are beginning to brown. Add more liquid if necessary.
  • Lower heat to medium-low and add the garlic, cook for 1 min. Add the spinach and stir. Cover pan and let spinach cook down, 2 -3 minutes. Add hominy and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

To assemble

  • Bring a medium sauce pot to low-medium heat and pour in sauce. Heat just enough to get it hot. If it simmers, the sauce might break.
  • Warm corn tortillas in the microwave for 30 seconds or in the oven at 350F on a sheet tray for 5 min. Just enough so that the tortillas are soft enough to be rolled.
  • Spread 2-3 tbsp. of the peanut sauce on the bottom of a 9 x13 baking dish, Place 1 tbsp. of filling on each tortilla. Roll and place on baking dish. Continue this process until you have used up all the tortillas and the entire filling.
  • Pour the rest of the peanut sauce on top of the enchiladas and drizzle almond crema on top.

Notes

If the sauce and the filling are hot there is no need to put the enchiladas in the oven. If you would rather place them in the oven do so at 350°F for 5-7 minutes. If you are allergic to peanuts you can use cashews or almonds. Corn tortillas are the best option for this recipe.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 387kcal | Carbohydrates: 57g | Protein: 18g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 648mg | Potassium: 1392mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 7490IU | Vitamin C: 21.8mg | Calcium: 170mg | Iron: 4.3mg

Nutrition Facts
Peanut Enchiladas with Braised Greens
Amount Per Serving (1 serving)
Calories 387 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Fat 10g15%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Sodium 648mg28%
Potassium 1392mg40%
Carbohydrates 57g19%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 8g9%
Protein 18g36%
Vitamin A 7490IU150%
Vitamin C 21.8mg26%
Calcium 170mg17%
Iron 4.3mg24%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.