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Chipotle and Lime Burrito (Vegan Burgers and Burritos)

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I’ve been a fan of the blog Veggies Don’t Bite for a while. It was one of the first blogs that I found when I first went vegan that made me think I could actually make the change! Sophia de Santis is the founder of Veggies Don’t Bite, and she has just released her new cookbook Vegan Burgers & Burritos: Easy and Delicious Whole Food Recipes for the Everyday Cook. Today I’m sharing with you this chipotle and lime burrito stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sauteed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

What’s exciting about this book is that it’s plant-based, meaning it focuses on whole foods, doesn’t have refined sugars, and even includes gluten-free options. Also, who doesn’t like burgers and burritos? Our family loves them, they are some of the few things my kids will eat without questioning what’s in it.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

Every recipe has a beautiful picture, and includes 27 burgers, and 26 burritos. It also has a section with sides, and sauces to top your burger or burrito. Some of our favorite recipes so far are the Fajita your Burger, Sweet Potato Enchilada Burger, Frito Pie Pouches, and of course the Chipotle and Lime Burritos. I love the book so far, but I wish there was a recipe for burger buns and tortillas. I don’t know about you, but I struggle to find a burger bun that doesn’t have refined sugar in it.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

From the kitchen perspective, the recipes are easy to make and don’t use weird or hard to find ingredients. Plus, burgers and burritos are very convenient lunch or picnic options, because they are portable. They also make great game day or tailgating food to munch on. Vegan Burgers and Burritos is available on Amazon in paperback and kindle. Enjoy!

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.

The Recipe: Chipotle and Lime Burrito

Serve with homemade salsa or smoky tangy cream sauce. You could also eat this on warm corn tortillas.

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.
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Chipotle and Lime Burritos

This chipotle and lime burrito is stuffed with a mixture cilantro-lime rice and beans, sautéed spicy peppers, and a smoky chipotle cream sauce. From the book Vegan Burgers and Burritos by Sophia De Santis.
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Chopped red, yellow and green bell pepper mix
  • ½ cup Chopped spicy pepper of choice (jalapeño, cherry bomb, etc.)
  • ½ cup Chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup Low-sodium veggie broth or drizzle of oil, for sautéing
  • 1 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1 tsp. Garlic Powder
  • 2 tbsp. Fresh lime juice

RICE AND BEANS

  • 1 ½ cups Cooked brown rice
  • 1 cup Cooked or canned black beans, drained and rinsed
  • ¼ cup Chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tbsp Fresh lime juice
  • ¾ tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp chipotle powder

TO SERVE

  • 4 to 5 to tortillas
  • Avocado
  • Shredded cabbage
  • Smoky Tangy Cream (page 135) or World’s Best Roasted Salsa (page 132)

Preparation

  1. Sauté the peppers and onion in a pan over medium heat with veggie broth, salt, garlic powder and lime juice until cooked and fragrant, about 10 to 12 minutes. You may need to add more broth if it gets too dry. The mixture is ready when the veggies are soft and almost sticky looking.
  2. To make the rice and beans, put the cooked rice, beans, cilantro, lime juice, salt and chipotle powder in a bowl and mix well.
  3. Once everything is ready, build the burritos by filling the tortillas with the rice and beans, sautéed veggies, avocado and shredded cabbage.
  4. Drizzle the sauce or salsa over the filling ingredients.
  5. To fold the burrito, fold the sides over toward the center, then roll upward to create a burrito. (See page 15 for step-by-step photos.) You can grill the seam for 7 to 8 minutes until it seals and closes the burrito. You can also grill the other side to make it crisp.
  6. Kids: This can be served as a bowl if folding a burrito is too hard! Do not add spicy peppers or chipotle powder. Substitute spicy peppers with bell peppers.

DisclosureI received a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

Kitchen Creativity- My Review

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I have been a huge fan of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg since culinary school. A lot of the chefs at school would recommend that you read Becoming a Chef, and once they realized you were serious about making this your career they recommended Culinary Artistry. Once I started my career, every single chef I worked for had Culinary artistry in their library. Later I fell in love with the Flavor bible so I was so excited when the opportunity presented itself to review their new book Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius—with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the World’s Most Creative Chefs.

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

Kitchen Creativity has managed to put into words the creative process and strategies that chefs use when taking a raw material and turning it into a creation that inspires, innovates, and transmits ideas, feelings, and memories. It contains the voices of over 1oo chefs sharing tidbits of their creative process from farm to plate, including vegan chefs Tal Ronnen and Isa Chandra Moskowitz. It is not a recipe book, instead this book wants to inspire you to access your own style and creativity, and to use it as a way to express who you are and share it with others through food.

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

Easier said than done, if you ask me! So how do you become a creative cook? You do so in three stages: mastery, alchemy, and creativity. Mastery is the stage to develop a skill base or knowledge, and to imitate the masters. Alchemy is when you take new experience and knowledge and apply it to the classics. The final step, creativity, is all about connecting the old and new ideas, and combining them into something completely new.

Without a doubt, my favorite part of the book is part II: A World of Infinite Culinary Possibilities a.k.a The Lists (A-Z). In this section you will find comprehensive list of ideas for inspiration including flavor combinations by season, recent innovations in the culinary world, and best practices or techniques. Below you will find an excerpt of this section titled: Treating Plants Like Meat

Kitchen Creativity review, my thoughts and opinions on Karen Page and Andrew Donenburg's new book on unlocking your creativity in the kitchen

TREATING PLANTS LIKE MEAT

Brining

Bourguignon, e.g., beet, celery root

Burgers, e.g., portobellos, veggie

Carpaccio, e.g., beet, carrot, eggplant, king oyster mushroom, persimmon, root vegetables, winter squash, zucchini

Charring

Cheesesteaks, e.g., seitan (à la Philadelphia’s Blackbird Pizza’s version made with rosemary and garlic seared seitan, grilled onions and green peppers, and vegan whiz, served on an artisan hoagie roll)

Confit, e.g., bell pepper, carrots, garlic, mushrooms, onions, shallots, squash, tomatoes

Fondue, e.g., rutabaga (à la Rich Landau’s version at Philadelphia’s Vedge)

Dry-rubbing

Grilling

Marinating

Meatballs, e.g., legumes, mushrooms

Porterhouse, e.g., cabbage (à la Marc Forgione’s version at NYC’s American Cut)

Roasting, e.g., beets (à la John Fraser’s version at NYC’s Narcissa)

Searing

Shawarma, e.g., seitan (marinated in black pepper + chili powder + coriander + cumin + garlic + marjoram + olive oil + onion + oregano + rosemary + thyme) or trumpet mushroom (à la Rich Landau’s version at Philadelphia’s V Street)

Smoking, e.g., cabbage, carrots (think lox), cheese (e.g., Gouda, mozzarella), corn, eggplant, nuts, olives, potatoes, tempeh, tofu, tomatoes

Steaks, e.g., beet, cabbage, cauliflower, winter squash

Stewing

Tartare, e.g., beet, carrot

Torchon, e.g., mushroom (à la Eric Ziebold’s version at DC’s Kinship)

Wellington, e.g., carrot (à la John Fraser’s version at New York City’s Narcissa)

Wood-roasting, e.g., asparagus

Imagine: Chef Todd Gray of Equinox in Washington, D.C., started the Vegan Smackdown Challenge to create vegan versions of recipes from prominent chefs such as Jose Andres, Todd English, and Carla Hall. How would you go about creating a meatless, eggless, and dairy-free version of a classic dish?

Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius—with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the World’s Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017).

I highly recommend this book for all serious cooks, chefs, and food bloggers. If there is a chef in your life they need this! If you are a food blogger this book will let you in on what goes on in the mind of a chef, which will help immensely with recipe creation; but most importantly, it will motivate you to make your best ideas a reality.

DisclosureI received a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

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Pipian Rojo Over Rice – Decolonize Your Diet

How did I not know this book existed until now! Decolonize your Diet by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquivel is part manifesto, part cookbook, and part love story. It is a book that hopes to impulse a movement to help others heal their bodies, reclaim the culture of their ancestors, and revolt against the colonial systems that aim to suppress indigenous traditions.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

It all begins when Luz is diagnosed with breast cancer. This forces her to reexamine not only what she had been feeding her body, but to come up with a plan to survive the cancer. This led to her doing extensive research on breast cancer in Latino communities and what she found began a whole new way of life for both Luz and Catriona.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

In her research it was clear that immigrant Latinos had significantly lower breast cancer rates than those born in the US. Primarily, because immigrants led a diet closer to that of their ancestors, based on beans, corn, squash, wild greens, nopales, fresh fruit, nuts, and seeds. After this discovery, Luz and Catriona began to decolonize their diet.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

The book also touches on how decolonizing your diet fits in perfectly with the Chicana/o movement, in that it aims to preserve our indigenous cooking traditions. This part in particular pulled at my heart strings. I am technically not a chicana myself, because I was born in Mexico, though I have been living in this country for 13 years. My children however are chicanos, and as a mom it feels like every day is a fight against a culture that is not my own. I speak only Spanish to them, I cook Mexican food at home, and we continue traditions that my mother taught me, and her mother taught her. I want them to be proud of their heritage and a big part of that is food. Just like Luz and Catriona say in their book, food is a nexus connecting generations.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

There are over 120 recipes in this book, not all of them are vegan, but most of them include a vegan option. The recipes are wonderfully researched, the cooking techniques explained in detail, and there’s even a section with menu ideas. My favorite ones so far are Verdolagas & Nectarine Summer Salad, Chipotle Pumpkin Soup, and the Tlacoyos con Quelites.

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.

Thank you, Luz and Catriona, for the inspiring me to continue to publish plant-based recipes that honor Mexican culture and traditions. I hope to meet you guys some day and maybe share a meal that honors our ancestors!

You can purchase Decolonize Your Diet on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Indibound.

The Recipe: Pipian Rojo Over Rice

I have chosen this Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe to share with you, because it is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is a hearty, stick to your ribs kind of sauce, made with roasted pumpkin seeds, roasted tomato, and dried pasilla, arbol, and ancho chiles. The sauce is served over potatoes, green beans, and chayote. You can serve this over a bed of rice with a green salad. Enjoy!

Pipian Rojo Over Rice recipe is perfect for the coming fall and winter months. The sauce is very hearty and made with roasted pumpkin seeds.
5 from 1 vote
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Pipian Rojo Over Rice

Recipe from the book Decolonize Your Diet by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Recipe used with permission from author. 

Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8 Servings

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 2 Corn tortillas
  • 3 Guajillo chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 5 Pasilla chiles, dried, deseeded
  • 1 Chile de Arbol, dried, deseeded
  • 1 White onion, peeled, and quartered
  • 2 Garlic, whole, unpeeled
  • 2 Medium tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup Pumpkin seeds, raw, hulled (pepitas)
  • 8 Allspice berries, whole
  • 6 Peppercorns
  • 1 tsp. Achiote, ground
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. Pepper

Stew

  • 5 Purple potatoes, medium-sized, scrubbed
  • 1/2 lb. Green beans, ends removed
  • 1 Chayote, peeled
  • 1 Onion, diced
  • 3 tbsp. Olive oil (optional)
  • 4 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 2 tbsp. Pumpkin seed oil (optional)
  • 2 cups Cooked rice (white or brown)
  • 1/4 cup Pumpkin seeds, raw, hulled, for garnish
  • 1/4 cup Cilantro, leaves only

Preparation

To make sauce

  1. On a griddle on medium high-heat, toast corn tortillas until crispy and slightly charred. Set aside. On the same griddle, toast dried chiles for 1 minute on each side, taking care not to burn. Put chiles in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Use a small plate to keep chiles submerged for 30 minutes.

  2. On same hot griddle, slightly char onions and garlic, about 4 minutes. Peel garlic and place it with onions in blender. Put whole tomatoes on griddle and turn often to char on several sides, then add to blender. When chiles have finished soaking, drain, and add to blender.

  3. On same hot griddle, toast pumpkin seeds until they begin to puff up. Reserve 1/4 cup of pumpkin seeds for garnish, and add the rest to the blender. On griddle, toast allspice and peppercorns for a few seconds and add to blender wth achiote, salt, and pepper. 

  4. Break charred tortillas into quarters and add to blender. Purée until ingredients form a smooth sauce. If necessary, work in batches or add a small amount of water to blender to process smoothly. Sauce should have the consistency of a tomato sauce or just a little bit chunkier. 

To make stew:

  1. Coarsley chop potatoes, green beans, and chayote into hearty, bite-sized chunks and set aside. In a large pot on medium heat, sauté onions in olive oil for 5 minutes. Add garlic and stir until fragrant. Add potatoes, green beans, and chayote and stir to combine. 

  2. Season vegetables with salt. Add just enough water to cover vegetables and bring to a boil. Stir in pipian sauce. Lower heat to medium simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes or until vegetables are fork-tender. Adjust seasonings.

  3. Divide rice between bowls and serve pipian over rice. Garnish each serving with a drizzle of pumpkin seed oil, pumpkin seeds, and cilantro leaves.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book to complete this review. 

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Torta Ahogada Recipe (Vegan Mexico Cookbook)

This torta ahogada recipe or Mexican “drowned” sandwich is a crusty bread torta filled with refried beans and avocado slices, and drowned in a spicy chile de árbol salsa. It is a classic dish from Guadalajara, and it is not for the faint of heart or stomach! The recipe is from Jason Wyrick’s new book Vegan Mexico.  Jason is the chef and author behind Vegan Tacos and the blog The Vegan Taste.

VM-Front-Cover-8-6-16

I am a huge fan of Jason and his recipes, so I was very excited when I received a copy of Vegan Mexico. It has taken me this long to write about it (the book was released in December), because I have been immersed in it since the day I got it! The book has over 100 recipes, all Mexican, and every one of them vegan. The recipes range from very easy to some more time consuming and complicated. My favorite part of the book is the stories and research behind the recipes. Each recipe giving you a little tid-bit of information on Mexican culture and tradition. It is exciting to see so many of my favorite recipes, and even some that I had not even thought of made vegan.

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The only thing I would change in the book, would be to add more pictures. There are a good number of pictures, but I think some of the recipes could benefit from step-by-step pictures. Some of my favorite recipes so far is of course this Torta Ahogada, the Tomato Black Bean Soup, and the Sweet Potato and Black Bean Mole Enchiladas.  Jason’s book is available on Amazon in paperback ($12.12)  and kindle format ($7.99).

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The Recipe: Torta Ahogada Recipe

This is like Jason Wyrick clearly states in his book, one of the spiciest meals you will ever eat. Legend says the sandwich was invented when a street vendor accidentally dropped a torta in a container of spicy salsa, this drowning it. If you would still like to try this, but aren’t a fan of heat, check the recipe notes for a non-spicy or less spicy version. Traditionally a crusty salted bread called birrote is used, but you can use french baguette or bolillo instead. Enjoy!

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This Torta ahogada recipe is a crusty bread torta filled with refried beans and avocado, and drowned in a spicy chile de arbol salsa.
5 from 1 vote
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Torta Ahogada

This Torta ahogada recipe is a crusty bread torta filled with refried beans and avocado, and drowned in a spicy chile de arbol salsa. Recipe from Vegan Mexico Cookbook.

Main Course
Mexican
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 2 tortas
Author Jason Wyrick

Ingredients

Tortas:

  • 2 Bolillo rolls or 6-inch long baguettes, split in half about 3/4 of the way
  • 1 cup Refried beans, using black beans, or store-bought refried black beans
  • 1 Ripe Hass avocado, pitted, peeled, and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices

Sauce: (WARNING: See note)

  • 30 Chiles de árbol, stemmed, seeded, and rehydrated
  • 3 Cloves of garlic
  • 3/4 cup White vinegar (white balsamic works best)
  • 1 cup Water
  • 1 tsp. Dried Mexican oregano
  • 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. Ground cloves
  • 1 tsp. Salt

Garnishes:

  • 2 Radishes, thinly sliced
  • 8 to 12 White pickled onions, separated into rings, or raw white onion rings (see note)
  • Lime wedges

Preparation

Tortas

  1. Lightly toast the rolls or baguettes. Warm the beans and spread them evenly in each roll. Add the avocado slices. Place the sandwiches in bowls. 

Sauce:

  1. In a blender or food processor, puree the rehydrated chiles de árbol, garlic, vinegar, water Mexican oregano, cumin, pepper, cloves, and salt. (Strain if you want a very smooth sauce.) Pour the sauce over the sandwiches. Garnish the sandwiches with the sliced radishes and pickled onions and serve with lime wedges. Eat these tortas with a fork and lots of napkins.

Chef's Notes

WARNING: This sandwich is hot, really hot! For a less spicy version omit the water and add 1 to 3 cups of crushed fire-roasted tomates to the salsa and omit or decrease the chiles de árbol to your taste. 

Another option is to make two sauces, a non-spicy tomato sauce and the chile de árbol sauce. This way you can drown your torta in the non-spicy tomato sauce and drizzle some of the árbol sauce on top.

You can find a recipe for pickled onions here and one for refried beans here. 

 

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Tomatillo Poblano White Beans (The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook for Your Instant Pot)

These tomatillo poblano white beans are a warm stew of perfectly creamy beans, tart tomatillos, spicy poblano pepper, onion, cumin, and oregano. They can be made in less than 40 minutes in your Instant Pot. The recipe is from my new favorite cookbook The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook for Your Instant Pot. The author of the book is Kathy Hester, the blogger behind Healthy Slow Cooking.

These tomatillo poblano white beans are a warm stew of perfectly creamy beans, tomatillos, spicy poblano pepper, onion, cumin, and oregano.

I got an Instant Pot for Christmas, because I kept hearing so many great things about it, and how I was going to love it and so on. To tell you the truth I was unsure about the whole thing, because I’m more of a do-it-yourself than using an appliance. I have tried using a slow cooker before, and it just didn’t work out for me. I kept forgetting to put the food in the morning and by the time I remembered it was too late, and I would just cook whatever I was going to make on the stove. However, the Instant Pot is a pressure cooker, not a slow cooker, and that really appealed to me. Pressure cooking saves time, instead of cooking beans on the stove for two hours they can be done in 40 minutes!

These tomatillo poblano white beans are a warm stew of perfectly creamy beans, tomatillos, spicy poblano pepper, onion, cumin, and oregano.

It sounds good right? Well, the Instant Pot sat in the box for almost five weeks before I had the courage to try and figure it out. That’s where Kathy’s book comes in. Thanks to the book I was able to use the Instant Pot without a problem and realized that it’s actually quite easy to use. There are so many good recipes in this book, some that I didn’t even imagine could me made in the Instant Pot, like the Chocolate Tofu Cheesecake with a Hazelnut-Oat Crust. All the recipes are vegan and most can be made gluten-free and without oil. I can’t wait to try the Spicy Jackfruit Tinga and the Mole Sauce.

Now that there will soon be a new addition to this little family I am going to be relying on The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook for Your Instant Pot for some quick, delicious, healthy vegan meals.

These tomatillo poblano white beans are a warm stew of perfectly creamy beans, tomatillos, spicy poblano pepper, onion, cumin, and oregano.

The Recipe: Tomatillo Poblano White Beans

Soak the beans the night before, this will shorten the cooking time. If you want to make this on the stove top, I recommend you used canned beans instead of cooking them from scratch. Process the tomatillo, onion, jalapeño and poblano in the blender until chopped but not completely pureed and simmer this mixture for 8-10 minutes. Add the canned beans and let simmer for 5 more minutes. If the sauce is too thick add vegetable stock or water. Season to taste. Enjoy!

These tomatillo poblano white beans are a warm stew of perfectly creamy beans, tomatillos, spicy poblano pepper, onion, cumin, and oregano.
5 from 7 votes
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Tomatillo Poblano White Beans

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Kathy Hester

Ingredients

Saute Ingredients

  • 2 cups Chopped tomatillos
  • 1 cup Chopped poblano, seed and stems removed before chopping
  • 1 cup Chopped Onion
  • 1/2 Jalapeño, without seeds, or use more to make it hotter
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin

Pressure Cooker Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups Dried Great Northern beans, soaked for 8-12 hours and drained
  • 1 1/2 cups Water
  • 2 tsp. Dried oregano
  • To Taste Salt and Pepper

Preparation

  1. For the sauté, add the tomatillos, poblano, onion and jalapeño to your blender or food processor. Pulse until the veggies are in tiny pieces, but not pureed.

  2. Use the sauté setting over normal, or medium heat, and pour in the blended veggies; add the cumin and stir to combine. Cook for about 4 minutes to remove the edge off the onions and make the cumin more fragrant.
  3. For the pressure cooker, add the beans, water and oregano to the sauté mixture and stir to combine. Put the lid on and make sure that the steam release handle is sealed. Cook on manual setting at high pressure and set for 35 minutes. 

  4. Allow the pressure to release naturally.

  5. If there is still more liquid in the pot than you’d like to have, switch back to the sauté setting and simmer to allow some of the liquid to evaporate.

  6. Add salt and pepper to taste before serving.

Chef's Notes

If you want to make this on the stove top, I recommend you used canned beans instead of cooking them from scratch. Process the tomatillo, onion, jalapeño and poblano in the blender until chopped but not completely pureed and simmer this mixture for 8-10 minutes. Add the canned beans and let simmer for 5 more minutes. If the sauce is too thick add vegetable stock or water. Season to taste.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

 

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Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas (Salud, Vegan Mexican Cookbook)

This post contains affiliate links.

Have you guys heard of Eddie Garza? This past December he published his first book Salud! Vegan Mexican Cookbook and I was thrilled to receive a copy, and to share with you this recipe for Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas.

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Eddie is the Senior Manager of food & nutrition at the Humane Society of the United States. He is very passionate about teaching the Hispanic and Latino community about healthy plant-based eating. He often appears on TV giving demonstrations, and he travels around the US and Mexico giving cooking classes. I had the opportunity to speak to him over the phone and I was touched by his energy and dedication.

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¡Salud! Vegan Mexican takes traditional Mexican dishes and recreates them to be healthy and plant-based. You can find everything from tacos, burritos, enchiladas, tamales, and salsas. The recipes are very easy to follow and will appeal to the whole family.

My favorite part of the book is that it has both very traditional recipes and some not so traditional ones taken straight out of Eddie’s childhood. (Eddie’s family is from Mexico, but he was born and raised in Brownsville, TX.) My only complaint is that I wish the book had more pictures.

If you are new to veganism or Mexican food you won’t have to worry. Eddie goes over the basics, and does a very good job describing ingredients and cooking techniques. My favorite recipes so far are the Mashed Potatoes and Poblano Flautas, Amaranth Granola with Oats and Mexican Chocolate, Seven Seas Soup, and the Spicy Eggplant Barbacoa Tacos. The book is available for purchase on Amazon, itunes, and Barnes & Noble.

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The Recipe: Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas

These crispy golden flautas are filled with mashed potatoes spiced with poblano peppers, garlic, onion, and cumin. They can be baked or pan fried to a crisp. Your kids will love them! Serve with your salsa of choice, or you can serve them with this Spicy Avocado Sauce for Tacos.

These Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas from Salud Vegan Mexican Cookbook are golden, crispy, and filled with creamy mashed potatoes and poblano.
5 from 2 votes
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Mashed Potato and Poblano Flautas

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 12 flautas
Author Eddie Garza

Ingredients

  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 tsp. Vegetable oil
  • 1/2 Onion, white, diced small
  • 1 Poblano chile, diced small
  • 1 tsp. Whole cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 Russet potatoes, baked or microwaved, skins discarded
  • 1 tbsp. Almond milk, unsweetened
  • 12 Corn tortillas

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Lightly spray a nonstick baking sheet with a nonstick cooking spray.

  2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and poblano chile for 4 to 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add the cumin seeds, salt, pepper, and garlic. Sauté 4 more minutes. Remove from the heat.

  3. In a large bowl, mix together the onion mixture, cooked potato, and almond milk. Mash well. Some visible chunks are fine.

  4. Warm the tortillas until they are pliable.

  5. To assemble the flautas, place 2 tbsp. of potato filling in each tortilla and roll it up tightly. Place on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat until all the tortillas are rolled up.

  6. Lightly spray the flautas with nonstick cooking spray and place in the oven. Bake 10 to 12 minutes , or until the edges of the tortillas are brown and crispy. Turn the pan halfway through the cooking time for even cooking.

I received a free copy of this book, but all opinions and thoughts are my own.

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Jeni’s Vegan Mexican Cookbook & Roasted Poblano Hummus

Jeni from Thyme and Love has just released her book The Vegan Mexican Cookbook: Plant-Based Recipes Inspired by Mexico and I couldn’t be more excited! Jeni lived in Mexico city for a time with her husband, and she fell in love with the cuisine and it definitely shows in this book. I found Jeni online about two years ago, she was still living in Mexico at the time, and I quickly became a fan. It is exciting to find other bloggers that share your love of Mexican cuisine, especially vegan Mexican cuisine.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

The book has 25 recipes, they are all quite easy to make, and all plant-based (vegan). The book also has great photography, all done by Jeni herself. My only complaint is that there aren’t more recipes! I’m looking forward to trying the kale and potato taquitos, the hibiscus tacos with guacamole, and the rice pudding popsicles. The best part is that it is only $6.99. The book is only available in electronic form. I encourage you to stop by Thyme & Love and enjoy some of her recipes, and of course to show Jeni some support by buying her book. To get 30% off of your book purchase use the code dorastable30. Thank you Jeni!

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

Today I am going to share with you a recipe from Jeni’s book: Roasted Poblano Hummus. The smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, and the acidity of the lemon and lime really complements the chickpeas and tahini. It is super easy to make and a great appetizer for sharing.

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.

 

The Recipe: Roasted Poblano Hummus

If you have never roasted your own poblano peppers before you can use canned ones, but roasted them is not complicated at all. The recipe calls for canned chickpeas, but you can cook your own if you like. If you prefer your hummus on the less lemony side I would reduce the amount of lemon and lime. Enjoy!

Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.
5 from 1 vote
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Roasted Poblano Hummus

Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2 cups
Author Jeni Hernandez

Ingredients

  • 2 Poblano Peppers
  • 1 (15 oz.) can Chickpeas, drained, rinsed
  • 2 1/2 - 3 tbsp. Tahini
  • 3 tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 1 Garlic, clove, peeled
  • 2 tbsp. Lemon, juice
  • 2 tbsp. Lime. juice
  • 3-4 tbsp. Water
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea Salt, or taste
  • 1/4 cup Toasted pine nuts for garnish, optional
  • 1 Pinch Cilantro for garnish, optional

Preparation

  1. Roast the poblano peppers on a comal or heavy skillet over medium heat. Cook until blackened, turning the chiles often. Depending on the thickness of the comal or skillet, it can take 15-20 minutes until all sides of the chiles are blackened.

  2. Once the chiles have blackened, transfer them to a plastic ziploc bag and let them steam for 15-20 minutes. Once the chiles have steamed, peel off the skin. Them cut a slit along the side of the chile and remove the seeds and veins. Roughly chop the chiles and add to a high speed blender or food processor.

  3. Add the chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, lime juice, water and salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until completely smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. Add a tablespoon of water if needed.

    Roasted Poblano Hummus, the smoky flavor of the poblano pepper really pulls through in this smooth hummus, eat with corn or pita chips.
  4. Taste for seasonings.

  5. Refrigerate until ready to serve. If using toasted pine nuts to garnish, add them to the hummus just before serving. Serve with chips or assorted veggies. 

Chef's Notes

To toast the pine nuts, preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and add the pine nuts. Toast for 8-10 minutes. remove from the baking sheet and transfer to a bowl until ready to serve. 

 

 

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The Vegetable Butcher Review and Jicama Grapefruit Salad

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway

This is the book I’ve been waiting for! Whenever somebody approaches me about wanting to transition to a vegan or vegetarian diet I can see the concern in their faces. Vegetables, all you eat is vegetables? The problem with vegetables is not that they are not tasty, it’s that hardly anybody knows how to prepare them. Vegetables are some of the most versatile of all natural food items. Just think of the countless dishes and recipes that you can make using just potatoes. This book does a great job of demystifying vegetables and offering practical ways of preparing them in your own home.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and GiveawayParsnip and Ginger Cake. Photo by Matthew Benson

The Vegetable Butcher was written by Cara Mangini. Cara comes from a family of old school butchers, and over the years found that her passion was in vegetables not meat. She trained as a professional chef and worked in New York, St. Helena, and now Columbus, OH, where she runs her own produce stand and vegetable centric restaurant, Little Eater Produce and Provisions. She has spent years devoted to teaching and helping others discover how to make delicious meals from vegetables.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and GiveawayGrilled Smothered Artichokes. Photo by Matthew Benson

Her book takes you through 53 vegetables from A to Z detailing the season in which the vegetable can be found, the varieties, and how to select and store them. There are also step-by-step pictures on how to prep and breakdown these vegetables, cooking methods that can be used to cook them, and several recipes where you can put your new found knowledge to use.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and GiveawayPotato Gnocchi. Photo by Matthew Benson.

I really enjoyed the crisp pictures, the detail in which each vegetable is approached, and the recipes. Even though the recipes are not necessarily vegan, they can be easily adapted. I can’t really say I disliked any part of the book, rather I wish the less accesible vegetables like crosnes had been left out and more emphasis had been given to other vegetables, like how to prep and work with a greater variety of mushrooms.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway

I loved Cara’s approach to being vegetable centric. There is no preachy speech on how you should eat more vegetables, there’s no mention of saving animals, and there is one (only one) reference to health. Vegetables are spectacular. They can be luscious, sexy, satiating, and this book is just what you need to make that happen in your kitchen.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway

Jicama Grapefruit Salad

This jicama grapefruit salad with sweet soy dressing from The Vegetable Butcher  is refreshing, tangy, crunchy, and the right amount of sweet.

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway
5 from 1 vote
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Jicama and Grapefruit Salad

Recipe courtesy of The Vegetable Butcher by Cara Mangini (Workman Publishing Company; April 19, 2016); reprinted with permission.
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Cara Mangini

Ingredients

  • 1/2 head Red cabbage, cored, and neatly sliced (about 6 cups ; see Notes)
  • 1 tbsp. Sea salt, plus extra as needed
  • 3/4 cup Whole pecans
  • 2 tbsp. Canola or grapeseed oil, plus extra as needed
  • 2 tbsp. Brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup Soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. Rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. Freshly squeezed lime juice, plus extra as needed
  • 1 tbsp. Granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp. Minced garlic
  • 1/4 tsp. Crushed red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 Medium jicama, cut into matchsticks or shredded (about 3 cups)
  • 2 Medium carrots, cut into matchsticks or shredded (about 1 1⁄2 cups )
  • 1/2 cup Loosely packed fresh mint leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 2 Pink grapefruits, skin and membranes removed, cut into segments (see Notes)
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Place the cabbage in a large bowl, add 5 cups of water and 1 tablespoon of salt, and let stand for 15 to 30 minutes while you prepare the rest of the salad. (This will make the cabbage less chewy and more crisp.)
  2. Place the pecans in a medium-size skillet over medium heat, and toast, stirring frequently (watch them closely to ensure they don’t burn), until they become fragrant and golden, 4 to 6 minutes. Add 2 teaspoons of the canola oil and a generous pinch of salt and stir to coat the nuts. Add the brown sugar and continue to stir to melt the sugar and coat the pecans, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and spread out the pecans on a piece of parchment paper to cool. Coarsely chop them completely.
  3. Meanwhile, whisk together the soy sauce, vinegar, lime juice, granulated sugar, garlic, and red pepper akes in a small bowl.
  4. Toss together the jicama, carrots, and remaining 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon of oil in a large bowl. Drain the cabbage well, wrap it in a kitchen towel to absorb excess moisture, and squeeze it with your hands to encourage softening. Add the cabbage to the jicama mixture, then drizzle with the dressing to taste and toss to coat. Add about three quarters of the mint and three quarters of the grapefruit, half of the pecans, and salt, pepper, and lime juice to taste. Toss to combine.
  5. Transfer the salad to individual plates and top with the remaining mint, grapefruit, and pecans.

Chef's Notes

A food processor will cut down your prep time. For the cabbage, use the thinnest slicing disk and quarter cabbage half to fit in the feed tube. For the carrots and jicama, use the shredding disk. Cut the carrots into lengths to fit in the feed tube and stack them in the feed tube, horizontally, on their sides. Push them through to shred them. Do the same with the jicama, cutting it in half lengthwise, then cutting each half into thirds lengthwise to fit in the feed tube.
To segment (or supreme) grapefruit: Cut a small piece on both ends, and stand the grapefruit on its widest at end. Moving from top to bottom, slide your chef ’s knife just under the skin, between the fruit and the pith, cutting them away and turning the fruit as you go until peel and pith are completely removed. Then hold the fruit in one hand, and slide your knife at about a 45-degree angle, between the fruit segment and its membrane, releasing it from both sides. If your grapefruits are particularly juicy, release the segments over a bowl to catch the juices.

 

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway

The Vegetable Butcher Review and Giveaway